Saturday, March 30, 2013

MAP News Issue 311, March 30, 2013

VerticalResponse
 

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

The MAP News
311th Edition                                 March 30, 2013


Dedicated to the memory of MAP's Executive Director's father, Pasquale Alfred Quarto 1912-2013

Action Alerts:

Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition
 
Urgent Action Alert: Please Sign the Following Letter to Save Bimini Island from Destructive Development: SEE SAMPLE LETTER

Update from the Mangrove Action and Australian Shorelines CLICK HERE
 
An Interview with Honduran Environmentalist and Goldman Award Winner EN ESPANOL

WE NEED HELP! – Stop Bombing Indonesia’s Mentawai Reefs!

VIEW THE VIDEO THEN
SIGN THE PETITION 
 
Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video
Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE” Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

CALLING FOR MANGROVE ART SUBMISSIONS!

We invite all primary school children from tropical and sub-tropical nations, and whose schools are located near mangroves, to create art telling us "why mangroves are important to me and my community". Selected winners will be published in a 2014 calendar to be distributed internationally to raise awareness of mangrove forest ecology. Email
monicagquarto@olympus.net or mangroveap@olympus.net or READ MORE

Phulbari Coal Mine Blog View Blog
Phulbari Update – NEW Watch Short Video

MAP's 2014 Children's Mangrove Art Calendar sponsors needed. View PDF

Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier
Donate.jpg


Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE



URGENT - VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

JOIN MAP! Immediate Internship Opportunity - Consumer awareness campaign at an international environmental NGO – SEATTLE AREAREAD MORE

MAP is looking for volunteer interns for its Thailand Headquarters – READ MORE

MAP’s VOLUNTEER INTERNS HELP MAP MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE
READ MORE

 


MANGROVE ISSUES 

MANGROVE BOOK – J. Primavera
The book Beach Forests and Mangrove Associates in the Philippines by J.H. Pimavera and R.B. Sadaba (ISBN 978-971-9931-01-0; National Library  CIP QK938.C6  581.75109599  2012  P220120602) is now available. aves, flowers, fruits, utilization and silviculture
.
SEE POSTER and order instructions

View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT THESE SIGHTS
SLIDE SHOW
    VIMEO SHOW

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine -
Read More
 


"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog

Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin

LISTEN TO INTERVIEW


Join MAP on Facebook


Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp


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Not yet a MAP News subscriber?
Click here to subscribe.



Note to Our Readers:
We strive to keep active links in our newsletter. However, due to circumstances beyond our control,
occasionally links to stories may become broken. If you find a link to a story is not functioning, please cut and paste the headline into your browser search bar. In most cases you should be able to locate the original story.



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Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:

Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games

Visit the Mangrove Action Project recycle website Click on the recycle button then click on the Download Shipping Label, and follow the instructions.

 

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FEATURED STORY

Building a global consortium opposing the imports of tropical shrimp or prawns into N. America and the EU
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USA - We at Mangrove Action Project (MAP) are reaching out to other NGOs involved in seafood issues to ask your help in spreading the word concerning imported tropical shrimp. Today, shrimp is the number one seafood consumed in the US, surpassing tuna in 2001. 90% of that shrimp is imported from the Global South, and produced in ways that are destructive of both the marine environment and the local coastal comminities who depend on the sea for life and livelihoods. We are working to reduce this consumption demand in the US, which drives the very destructive expansion of the shrimp aquaculture industry.  MAP is part of a global campaign that aims to reduce US Consumer appetite for those all too plentiful imports of shrimp or prawns from Asia, Latin America or Africa. Please contact us if your organization is interested in joining our growing network and global alliance to stop this destructive industry. We need your help in reaching out to the general public. Please also help us get "signatures" onto our recently launched Avaaz petition. The more signatures we can muster, the better!
 
AFRICA

Antanandahy: Where the Women Rule the Mangroves
Sylvia (right), Blue Forests scientist, with the president of Antanandahy, a village in the mangroves of the Tsiribihina Delta (K England)
Editors note - This story is co-written by former MAP-Asia Volunteer Intern, Sylvia Paulot from Madagascar.  Sylvia interned in the MAP Asia office in Trang, Thailand and with our project at Phra Thong Island in Phang Nga (May-Aug. 2012).  She became very keen on mangroves while with MAP in Thailand and upon returning to Madagascar she joined Blue Ventures Conservation as a Mangrove Conservation Officer based in Tulear.  MAP wishes her well in new job hopes to continue to interact with her on conservation issues. 
MADAGASCAR -After winding its way west, Madagascar’s Tsiribihina River splits into a maze of tributaries entwined in mangroves, finally emptying into the Mozambique Channel. At the end of last year, Sylvia and Kate of the Blue Forests team made their way north to the Tsiribihina Delta, meeting with WWF Madagascar, local partners, and communities who have all worked together on mangrove conservation there since 2011. Our goal was to initiate a relationship with these communities and start a feasibility study for blue carbon in Tsiribihina - and what a place to do it! The locals of the Tsiribihina Delta truly live a mangrove lifestyle – from fish and wood to storm protection – the people here are linked with the mangrove forest at every turn. READ MORE

Thieves blight Nigeria's swamps with spilt oil
NIGERIA - In a mangrove forest at the edge of a Nigerian swamp a film of oil shimmers in rainbow colors for hundreds of meters around Royal Dutch Shell's Nembe creek pipeline. The cause of this latest environmental catastrophe, Shell says, was an unprecedented level of oil theft targeting a pipeline pumping 150,000 barrels of oil a day to the Atlantic coast. Nembe is one of the most important production routes for Africa's top energy producer, but it is also a frequent target for criminal gangs who tap into pipelines and steal crude for sale to world markets or local refineries. The impact on the environment of such so-called "bunkering" practices - and on the largely subsistence fishing communities who live around the pipelines in the creeks and swamps of the Niger Delta - is devastating. Decades of oil spills from a combination of theft and poor environmental management by oil majors has ravaged this fragile wetlands environment. READ MORE
 
Report warns of ways climate change threatens food security of urban poor
GHANA - Policies to increase food security in developing countries focus too much on rural food production and not enough on ensuring poor people could access and afford food, especially in urban areas. This is contained in a report published by the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) and made available to the GNA. It warns that climate change would only make this policy gap worse because climate change impacts would affect not only harvests but also the systems that people use to transport, store and buy and sell food. “Food security is back on the agenda thanks to rising prices and the threat that climate change poses to agricultural production,” says the report’s author Dr Cecilia Tacoli. READ MORE
 
ASIA
 
Concern grows over future of Thailand's endangered dugong
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THAILAND - Marine experts and veterinarians met in Trang on March 21 to draw up a master plan to increase the number of dugongs in the sea off this southern province as they have dropped alarmingly in recent years. The meeting was attended by officials from state agencies concerned with marine and coastal resources conservation, environmental advocates and members of fishing communities from Trang and Phuket. The number of rare marine animals being found dead -- especially dugongs, dolphins and sea turtles – in the Andaman Sea off Trang and Phuket provinces continued to drop, Patcharaporn Kaewmong, of Phuket Marine Biological Centre, said. Last year, 11 dugongs were found dead in the sea off Trang, the highest number for the province in 20 years (1992-2011), Ms Patcharaporn said. An aerial inspection conducted last year showed there were 110-135 dugongs around Koh Libong -- Thailand’s largest habitat for the rare species located only 2km away from the Trang mainland -- after 134-150 were estimated in a 2011 survey. READ MORE
 Video by Chumporn Sangvilert and Yanapon Musiket.

Mangroves in S. Sulawesi face uncertain future
INDONESIA - South Sulawesi is facing massive mangrove forest destruction as over the past 30 years deforestation and pollution have taken their toll and damaged almost 90 percent of the total original areas. The Mangrove Action Project (MAP) Indonesia recorded that the damage had reached 89 percent, citing that the worst damage took place in the 1980s. The deforestation rate of mangrove forests has reached 2.2 percent annually. Currently, the province only has around 22,353 hectares of mangrove forests. “Before 1980, South Sulawesi had 214,000 of mangrove forest hectares by 1991 only 23,000 hectares remained,” said MAP Indonesia project director Ratnawati Fadillah during a seminar on mangrove rehabilitation and aquaculture development in Makassar. READ MORE

Bangladesh to develop shrimp industry
BANGLADESH - Bangladesh Frozen Foods Exporters Association (BFFEA), Bangladesh Shrimp and Fish Foundation (BSFF) and American Center for International Labor Solidarity (ACILS) signed a memorandum of agreement (MoA) recently. According to the MoA, the BFFEA, BSFF and the ACILS will work together to ensure compliance issue and labor rights at the shrimp and fish processing industry in Bangladesh. U.S. Ambassador to Bangladesh Dan W. Mozena while speaking at the signing ceremony emphasized on importance of the MoA to retain country's GSP facility in the U.S. market. READ MORE
 
Maldives first nation to become a biosphere reserve
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MALDIVES - The Maldives are a chain of 1,192 coral islands in the Indian Ocean, grouped into 26 atolls. They are well know for their reefs, making them as one of the best places for scuba diving all over the world. And now, the Maldivian government is trying to make them a United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Biosphere Reserve. The project will implement the reserve plan on more than half of Maldives islands by 2017, but they have still a lot to do. A Biosphere Reserve is not like a National Park, it is much more. It is a place based on a local community, made to promote sustainable development and conservation. READ MORE
 
EUROPE
 
Could social enterprise hold the key to saving our oceans?
social-enterprise-saving--008
UK - To quote WH Auden, "Thousands have lived without love, not one without water". He was also exactly right. Between 50% and 85% of the world's oxygen comes from the oceans, 50-80% of all life on Earth is found under the surface of the sea and over one billion people, often in the most deprived areas, depend on fish for their protein. Yet, very little is being done to protect and preserve the oceans. It is estimated that only 1% of the ocean are protected, compared with 12% of the land. However, some social entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs (those working within organisations) are looking at how they can use social innovations to fill this gap and solve some of the ocean's many problems. READ MORE
 
Global celebration of forests
UN - The United Nations Forum on Forests Secretariat partnered with the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival to honor the creative efforts of film makers who visually capture how forests inspire, shelter, nurture and contribute to our lives. This year's Film Festival is for short films of five minutes or less. We received 127 entries from 38 countries. The 21 finalists, selected by an international jury of lauded film makers and senior UN experts, were announced on the 21st of March. The five winning film makers will be honored in person during the tenth session of the Forum on Forests (UNFF10) in Istanbul on Wednesday, 10 April 2013. VIEW VIDEO
 
2013 World Migratory Bird Day Set for May 11-12
GERMANY - Each year on the second weekend in May, dedicated organizations and people around the world plan World Migratory Bird Day events to celebrate migratory birds in their region and to raise awareness about the need for their conservation. Since World Migratory Bird Day began in 2006, events have reached 118 countries. In 2012 alone, over 250 events were celebrated for World Migratory Bird Day and this year we hope to motivate even more people and organizations to connect and work together towards conserving migratory birds worldwide. This year’s World Migratory Bird Day theme is “Networking for migratory birds”. It aims to emphasize the mutual importance of ecological networks and networks between organizations and individuals for the long-term conservation of migratory birds. READ MORE
 
AMERICAS
 
MAP’s “Question Your Shrimp” campaign renewed
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USA – Mangrove Action Project has called for the US general consumer to pledge they will greatly reduce their consumption of imported shrimp. The petition on Avaaz.org tells consumers “Industrial Shrimp Aquaculture is causing massive environmental and social problems around the world, including mangrove forest loss, wild fisheries decline, shoreline erosion, coral reef and sea grass loss, displacement of countless coastal communities, loss of traditional livelihoods and displacement of countless coastal fishing and farming communities, human rights and labor abuses. And, most of this imported shrimp has serious health issues attached because of overuse of antibiotics and pesticides, and dirty water injected into the harvested shrimp to add more weight and thus dirty profits for an unscrupulous shrimp processor willing to risk your health for his profits”. READ MORE
 
Monterey Bay Aquarium releases updated Seafood Watch
USA - The Monterey Bay Aquarium has updated its Seafood Watch guide to sustainable buying of seafood from around the world. New “Good Alternatives” under the Aquarium’s science-based program include U.S.-caught monkfish, American plaice, some flounder; and tilapia farmed in Taiwan and China. The semi-annual Seafood Watch consumer update can be downloaded from the aquarium’s website, montereybayaquarium.org. READ MORE
Editors Note - It is good to see that the famous Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Pocket Guide still Red Lists Imported Shrimp! They almost delisted it as a "Good Alternative" about two years ago. So this is a good thing to see them keep imported shrimp on their red list!
 
Open letter to the UN and its institutions and initiatives related to forest issues
URUGUAY - On the occasion of March 21st, proclaimed by the UN General Assembly as International Day of the Forests (1), the World Rainforest Movement (WRM) and more than 300 signatories call on the General Assembly and UN Institutions and Initiatives related to forest issues to use the new initiative to address the underlying drivers of deforestation. The letter is motivated by the fact that in spite of several UN initiatives aimed at calling attention for forests at the international level, the process of deforestation -affecting especially tropical forests- continues and the proposed solutions have not slowed down tropical forest loss worldwide - on the contrary. READ MORE
 
Genting Group swallows Bimini Bay
BIMINI ISLAND - One of the largest corporations in Asia has agreed to take over operations at Bimini Bay Resort and invest $100 million in air and sea transportation to the island. In a speech to the House of Assembly yesterday, Prime Minister Perry Christie announced that Genting Group has engaged the government in a master plan that should  result in 400 new jobs. READ MORE
 
April, 2013 is Coastal Awareness month on Bimini Island
BIMINI ISLAND - The Honourable Prime Minister, Perry Gladstone Christie has declared April Coastal Awareness month. The Bahamas is a leader in conservation in the Caribbean and has made some historic decisions that have an impact worldwide. Our country has signed on to International Conventions related to the environment. The Bahamas Government signed the Convention on Biological Diversity in 1992, recognizing the importance of marine biodiversity and the necessity to develop mechanisms for the sustainable use of coastal and marine biological diversity. The country signed the RAMSAR Convention which provides for the protection of wetlands including shallow coastal and marine ecosystems in June, 1997. READ MORE
 
Crabfisher killed by electric fence in mangrove forest
BRAZIL - Retired crabfisher José Ribeiro dos Santos, age 74, died when he came into contact with an electric fence inside the mangrove swamps. It happened on 14/02/2013, around 16:00 pm, at the location of the Baixão Guahy, municipality of Maragojipe in Brazil. The area where the death occurred is recognized as belonging to Quilombo Palmares Cultural Foundation and was in the process of becoming protected before efforts stalled in 2006 due to interference from large contractors who covet the territory of fishermen. The person responsible for the death of Rieiro José dos Santos is an entrepreneur known as “Amazon John”, also called Coscoba who owns three hotels in the region between San Roque and village Guahy. It is believed Coscoba had appropriated the mangrove area next to one of his lodgings, and made ​​a clandestine network of high-voltage fencing to keep the fishermen out. READ STORY IN PORTUGUESE
 
LAST WORD
 
FROM MAP's EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR:
 
To Whom It May Concern,
 
I wish to inform you that we at Mangrove Action Project have been alerted of gross official negligence in following proper procedure regarding a required Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the a port facility proposed for Lamu, Kenya. Apparently this questionable EIA has already been submitted to NEMA since Feb 14, but the necessary public notice and request for comment was not given, In fact, only a few select stakeholders were notified, giving them 30 days to comment. And now the deadline is passed!!
 
We at MAP must strongly protest this illicit procedure, and ask that proper public notice and time for comment be given. MAP is an international network, working for over 21 years to conserve and restore our planet's still threatened mangroves, and we have already been contacting our network to publicize this issue at Lamu because of the threat to the mangroves this port proposal poses. It would be a sorry follow-up to now report that required public notification and comment period were not allowed. I ask you now, how can one get to comment if he/she is not aware that the report is out. And now, with no time to read a 200-page document and comment on its contents, we see a grave credibility issue brewing.
 
Let us face the facts; the law has been broken, as it is NEMAs duty to carry out a public forum which is announced at least two weeks in advance as per the EMCA Act. We ask that you extend the comment period to at least two weeks to a month to allow public review and comment on this important issue.
 
We at MAP await with deep concern your prompt reply and hopeful remedy of this troublesome situation!
 
For the Mangroves And the Mangrove Communities!
 
Alfredo Quarto,
 
Executive Director
 
Mangrove Action Project
 
mangroveap@olympus.net



~ If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com

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Mangrove Action Project

Friday, March 29, 2013

Antanandahy: Where the Women Rule the Mangroves

By Sylvia Paulot and Kate England
Blue Forests Team, Blue Ventures.

After winding its way west, Madagascar’s Tsiribihina River splits into a maze of tributaries entwined
in mangroves, finally emptying into the Mozambique Channel. At the end of last year, Sylvia
and Kate of the Blue Forests team made their way north to the Tsiribihina Delta, meeting with
WWF Madagascar, local partners, and communities who have all worked together on mangrove
conservation there since 2011. Our goal was to initiate a relationship with these communities and
start a feasibility study for blue carbon in Tsiribihina - and what a place to do it! The locals of the
Tsiribihina Delta truly live a mangrove lifestyle – from fish and wood to storm protection – the
people here are linked with the mangrove forest at every turn.

While still teaming with life, the degradation and outright deforestation of the mangroves of the
Tsiribihina Delta is obvious to local people, and they are acting to stop it. Communities here have
formed forest policing groups and have even reforested former mangrove areas. While we were
so impressed (it is impossible not to sing their praises) that’s not what this blog is about. What we
want to tell you about is a tiny village, tucked away in the mangroves of the Tsirbihina Delta, and the
women living there.

A local woman gathering salted fish for sale to local collector (K England)
Antanandahy (An-tan-an-die) is a modest village of about 400 people perched on a stretch of sand,
up one of many north-south tributaries of the Tsiribihina Delta. Accessible only by boat, the tiny
village bobs on the horizon until you pull up to its sandy white bank. Despite being outsiders, and
one of us a foreigner to boot, the people of Antanandahy were very friendly and easily plopped
down in the sand under a makeshift palm shelter to tell us about their lives, and the mangroves on
which they depend.




Pirogues in Antanandahay at sunset, Tsiribihina Delta (K England)
While the villagers were all smiles, life in Antanandahy is tough. A glimpse shows you that the
community has only the sea, the mangroves and the river channel to survive; there is no clean
water, no market, and no access to health care. There are few income opportunities here and there
are no signs of modern life, apart from a few people with mobile phones. Like many other villages
in the Tsiribihina Delta, bandits attack regularly, robbing the locals of their hard-earned cash from
selling fish and stealing whatever possessions they have in their homes.

Some of the women of Antanandahay in the Tsiribihina Delta, Madagascar (S Paulot)
In this dry, hot, and risky place, the women of the village are courageous, independent, and
active. Antanandahy village has a large mangrove forest, and like the men in the village, the women
use the mangrove forest to make a living – hiking through the mangrove to fish, catch crabs, collect
mollusks, harvest mangrove honey, and collect fuelwood. One can easily see that the women are at-
home, as they nimbly hop through the mangrove prop roots and never misstep in the deep mud.

During the three days we spent in Antanadahy, we observed a few training sessions with the local
fishers association, Lalanda, and the Ministry of Elevage (Ministry of Livestock), which had been
organized by WWF at the request of the villagers. Training included techniques for improving
methods for salting fish and keeping ducks. These activities are expected to lessen the pressure on
natural resources by supplementing household incomes. The highlight came when we realised that
although the salted fish training was intended for men, the audience ended up being mostly women.
While salting fish is traditionally a man’s job, the women of Antanandahy are actually in charge of
making the salted fish in many families.

Women at the salted fishes training (S Paulot)
When not busy harvesting mangrove resources, salting fish, caring for children, weaving palm
baskets, or cropping cassava and potatoes, these women are looking out for the mangrove forest.

When we raised the topic of mangrove conservation, we saw a special light come into the women’s
eyes. They spoke enthusiastically of the measures they take to protect the forest: they voluntarily
collect mangrove propagules, pick areas to be reforested, and journey through the delta in pirogues
to plant new mangrove trees. Not only are women replanting mangroves, but they play a vocal role
as mangrove custodians, inciting the men of the village to replace the mangrove they cut by planting
new ones. During group discussions, we were amused and pleased to see women calling out the
men who weren’t entirely honest about the ways they used the mangrove forest.


Women of Antanandahy showing how to plant mangroves (S Paulot)






A woman from Antanandahy in the mangroves. (S Paulot)

Striving to create their own future and better livelihoods, the women of Antanandahy tried to
form a women’s association, aimed at cooperative vegetable farming and duck rearing. However, a
disagreement about task-sharing brought an end to the project. When we asked how this happened,
one woman frankly answered that they need more training on running an association in order to
make it work. Few women here can read or write since the only school in the village was built just
a few years ago. The women recognized that this was a barrier to their empowerment and wanted
to do something about it. Unsurprised by their candour, we thought, while fish-salting and duck-
farming were important, these women also need training in governance, which would allow them
to play a critical role in the management of their local resources, which they know and use so
intimately. We felt safe concluding that if the women of other villages in the Tsiribihina Delta were
anything like here, that they would be a great credit to a mangrove carbon project. As we look to a
year ahead of project development in the Tsiribihina Delta, we can see that a little capacity building
will go a long way for a group of women with so much wit, assertiveness and heart.

Sylvia (right), Blue Forests scientist, with the president of Antanandahy, a village in the mangroves of the Tsiribihina Delta (K England)

This story is co-written by former MAP-Asia Volunteer Intern, Sylvia Paulot from Madagascar.  Sylvia interned in the MAP Asia office in Trang, Thailand and with our project at Phra Thong Island in Phang Nga (May-Aug. 2012).  She became very keen on mangroves while with MAP in Thailand and upon returning to Madagascar she joined Blue Ventures Conservation as a Mangrove Conservation Officer based in Tulear.  MAP wishes her well in her new job and hopes to continue to communicate with on conservation issues. 

SAVE BIMINI ACTION ALERT

Urgent Action Alert: Please copy and paste the following fetter to send to the ministers in Bimini Island asking them to
"Save Bimini Island from Destructive Development:"

To the Hon. Kenred Dorsett (Minister of the Environment), 
The Hon. Obie Wilchcombe (Minister of Tourism, and Member of Parliament for Bimini), 
and The Hon. V. Alfred Gray (Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources, 

Dear Sirs, 
Like all of the Bahamas, the islands of Bimini are intrinsically defined by the water that surrounds them. Not only has the water shaped and molded the islands themselves, but it has also defined the experience of those that visit these islands, as well as those that call the Bahamas their home. For everyone that loves little Bimini, their affection for its stunning blue water is at the base of their affinity for these precious 'Islands in the Stream.' 
Bimini's impressive tourism industry has always revolved around the water. Big game fishing, SCUBA diving, boating, sailing, bone fishing, snorkeling, kayaking, and a variety of wildlife encounters all contribute to the island's flourishing eco-tourism industry. 
In order to preserve this industry, and improve upon it going forward, I call on you to act strongly and swiftly regarding two important proposals. 
First, I urge you to finalize the full protections for the North Bimini Marine Reserve. Bimini's inshore ecosystems are the foundation for the entire Tourism Industry on the island, and every individual and business will benefit from this Reserve being formally protected. 
Second, I plead with you to ensure that the absurdly ill-conceived idea of creating a cruise ship terminal on Bimini's western shore never becomes a reality. The damage that this would have on Bimini's coral reefs would be catastrophic, and that would only be the beginning. The dredging and damage required for such a project could permanently deteriorate the very thing that everyone loves most about Bimini, the amazing blue waters. 
Bimini's tourism industry has been growing in recent years, while other islands in the Bahamas have not had the same good fortune. Please keep in mind that everyone who has ever come to Bimini came for what the island already offers; Extraordinarily blue water, exotic wildlife, beautiful beaches, thriving fisheries, vibrant coral reefs, friendly locals, and an escape for the generic, over-developed landscape found elsewhere in the region. 
Protecting and improving upon Bimini's ecological health and beauty is truly in the best interests of the island's economy, its people, and all those who cherish their time there. 
Please help us ensure a bright, blue future for Bimini. 
Respectfully yours,

(YOUR NAME AND CONTACT INFO - NO ANONYMOUS LETTERS PLEASE )

Saturday, March 16, 2013

MAP News Issue 310 March 16, 2013

VerticalResponse
 

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

The MAP News
310th Edition                                 March 16, 2013


Dedicated to the memory of MAP's Executive Director's father, Pasquale Alfred Quarto 1912-2013

Action Alerts:

Free Anwar Sadat Director WALHI South Sumatera: Arrest and persecution of Anwar Sadat linked to efforts to assist peasants
Sign Petition

Update from the Mangrove Action and Australian Shorelines CLICK HERE
 
An Interview with Honduran Environmentalist and Goldman Award Winner EN ESPANOL

WE NEED HELP! – Stop Bombing Indonesia’s Mentawai Reefs!
VIEW THE VIDEO THEN
SIGN THE PETITION 
 
URGENT ALERT! Mangrove International Action Needed for Reversing Brazil's Forest Code READ MORE AND VIEW SAMPLE LETTER
Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video
Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE” Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

CALLING FOR MANGROVE ART SUBMISSIONS!

We invite all primary school children from tropical and sub-tropical nations, and whose schools are located near mangroves, to create art telling us "why mangroves are important to me and my community". Selected winners will be published in a 2014 calendar to be distributed internationally to raise awareness of mangrove forest ecology. Email
monicagquarto@olympus.net or mangroveap@olympus.net

Phulbari Coal Mine Blog View Blog
Phulbari Update – NEW Watch Short Video
MAP's 2014 Children's Mangrove Art Calendar sponsors needed. View PDF
Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier
Donate.jpg

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE


URGENT - VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

JOIN MAP! Immediate Internship Opportunity - Consumer awareness campaign at an international environmental NGO – SEATTLE AREAREAD MORE

MAP is looking for volunteer interns for its Thailand Headquarters – READ MORE

MAP’s VOLUNTEER INTERNS HELP MAP MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE
READ MORE

 


MANGROVE ISSUES 

MANGROVE BOOK – J. Primavera
The book Beach Forests and Mangrove Associates in the Philippines by J.H. Pimavera and R.B. Sadaba (ISBN 978-971-9931-01-0; National Library  CIP QK938.C6  581.75109599  2012  P220120602) is now available. aves, flowers, fruits, utilization and silviculture
.
SEE POSTER and order instructions

View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT THESE SIGHTS
SLIDE SHOW
    VIMEO SHOW

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine -
Read More
 


"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog

Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin

LISTEN TO INTERVIEW


Join MAP on Facebook


Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp


Donate.jpg


Not yet a MAP News subscriber?
Click here to subscribe.



Note to Our Readers:
We strive to keep active links in our newsletter. However, due to circumstances beyond our control,
occasionally links to stories may become broken. If you find a link to a story is not functioning, please cut and paste the headline into your browser search bar. In most cases you should be able to locate the original story.



One Percent for the Planet Recipient Logo

 


Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:

Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games

Visit the Mangrove Action Project recycle website Click on the recycle button then click on the Download Shipping Label, and follow the instructions.

 

download_shipping_label

FEATURED STORY

Cristiano Ronaldo to Help Protect Bali Mangroves
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INDONESIA - Football superstar Cristiano Ronaldo has agreed to become an ambassador for Artha Graha Peduli’s mangrove conservation efforts in Bali, the foundation said in a statement. According to the statement, Tomy Winata, the founder of the Artha Graha Group and its philanthropic arm, AGP, first approached the Real Madrid and Portugal midfielder on Friday during a visit to the Spanish capital. “I am really thrilled and happy that Ronaldo has agreed to support our efforts to conserve mangrove forests in Indonesia,” Tomy said in the statement. “Ronaldo is fit to be the ambassador of our mangrove conservation drive, considering his persona and charm. We hope our message ‘Save Mangrove, Save Earth’ can reach all levels of society, both young and old, rich or poor.”  READ MORE
 
AFRICA
 
African Manatee: Freshwater Species of the Week
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SIERRA LEON - Delegates to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in Bangkok agreed to list the African manatee (Trichechus senegalensis) on Appendix I on an interim basis, boosting its protections. A final decision on the species’ status is expected by the time the conference wraps up on March 14, according to Humane Society International. The African manatee, also known as the West African manatee, can be found along the coasts and in rivers in 21 countries in West Africa, from Senegal south to Angola. African manatees primarily dine on plants that hang over water, such as mangroves. Microorganisms in their long digestive tracts help them process the vegetable matter. They will also eat occasional mollusks and fish. READ MORE
 
ASIA
 
Court of Appeals awards compensation to woman whose farmland suffered from nearby shrimp farm
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THAILAND - The Court of Appeals has awarded Bt1-million compensation to an elderly woman whose farmland suffered at the hands of a nearby shrimp farm. Noi Meepuang, the 86-year-old plaintiff from Non Thai district, welcomed the verdict. "I have solid evidence to prove my case," she said. A number of her neighbours congratulated her on winning the case yesterday. The court issued the ruling on March 5. The court ruled that a shrimp farm operated by Kraisorn Chotichakornphan had ruined 45 rai of Noi's paddy fields. Noi said she would use a part of the compensation to repay her Bt200,000 debt to the Bank for Agriculture and Agricultural Co-operatives. READ MORE
 
Shrimp claims need scrutiny
THAILAND - The attempt by a senior civil servant to wave off criticism of a major Thai shrimp farming company may have created more problems than it solved. Highly credible press reports show that a division of the country's giant Charoen Pokphand (CP) conglomerate is using very questionable methods to produce fish meal to feed and raise its shrimp. CP has disputed this, and the government has come to CP's defence, in unseemly haste. The brevity of the timeline is embarrassing. Last week the Sunday Times of London carried the provocative article: "Our taste for prawns is killing the sea." The Times reported that CP Foods, a major subsidiary of CP, produces food for its shrimp stock by using raw materials caught with fine-mesh nets. The nets scoop up virtually everything swimming in the vicinity of the fishing boat. Then, the so-called "trash fish" are turned into fish meal that is fed to the shrimp. READ MORE
 
Pledge with mangroves
PAKISTAN – It would be good to hear nice news that private sectors are now coming forward to encourage environment friendly atmosphere by sincere actions around their dirty, smoky, noisy industrial projects. The example and action is worth following and highly commendable to others. In this context, Pakistan International Bulk Terminal Limited one of the most and keen player in protecting of marine biological life having excellent record in his previous projects now wanted to play its pivotal role for the betterment of Environment and to protect biodiversity facing constant threats by inhuman actions surrounding its new project. Under this arrangement, Mangrove Nurseries would also be established in the project area to raise 60,000 container plants to meet the plantation needs. The nurseries would be staffed by the locals to provide livelihood opportunities for the coastal communities. READ MORE
 
Vital mangrove swamp in Balik Pulau being cleared, say fishermen
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MALAYSIA - A 12ha mangrove swamp in Kuala Jalan Bharu, which played a vital role in reducing the impact of the 2004 tsunami, has been cleared to make way for an alleged shrimp breeding project’s extension. Fishermen claimed that the mangrove located along the coastline of Balik Pulau and standing between the shrimp ponds and the sea had been cleared by the shrimp farm owner. Fisherman Thor Poh Lye, 78, said he found out about the mangrove clearing about two days ago, but believed the work had been going on for a week now. “The mangroves must not be chopped down. The swamp played a vital role during the tsunami disaster. It reduced the impact of the waves when they hit our village.
“If the trees are gone, there will be no shield to protect us during a natural disaster. Our houses could be destroyed,” he said at the site yesterday. READ MORE
 
Violence between shrimp farmers kills one
INDONESIA - A prolonged dispute between two rival shrimp farming groups led to a fatal clash recently. The incident in Dente Teladas district in Tulang Bawang regency, Lampung left one dead and 24 injured. Lampung Police chief spokesman Adj. Sr. Comr. Sulistyaningsih said that, Suwandi, 40, an employee of PT Central Pertiwi Bahari (CPB) was found dead in a canal in Adi Warna village, which is inside in the shrimp farm complex owned by PT CPB. Suwandi was an employee of the cold storage division of PT CPB, Southeast Asia’s largest shrimp farm. Sulistyaningsih said the Lampung Police Mobile Brigade (Brimob) had been deployed to Tulang Bawang to secure the shrimp farm along with 90 personnel from Tulang Bawang Police. She added that they were supported by soldiers from the Garuda Hitam Regional Military Command that oversees Lampung province. READ MORE
 
EUROPE
 
March 16 declared “Anti-Scampi Day” to draw attention to shrimp farming and mangroves
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SWEDEN - As demand for scampi (a large kind of shrimp or prawn) grows in the West, so do the scampi plantations in Southeast Asia—to the devastation of the mangrove forests, the coastal salt marshes, and the life in the ecosystems they support. The use of antibiotics and chemicals in the plantations also contaminates the basins, making them useful for only several years. Large tracts of land are rendered unusable. The livelihood of some of Southeast Asia’s poorest people depend on these ecosystems, and the sociological impacts are great. The Swedish Society for Nature Conservation (SSNC) has declared March 16 Anti-Scampi Day to highlight these problems. “Mangroves and other coastal ecosystems … are some of the world’s most productive ecosystems and millions of people depend on them for their livelihood,” says Sara Tynnerson, project leader for SSNC’s Anti-Scampi campaign. READ MORE
 
Conservation of mangrove forests
SWITZERLAND - Mangrove forests are an important part of tropical and sub-tropical coastlines but they are under considerable threat. They need more conservation action. The establishment of the Species Survival Commission (SSC) Mangrove Specialist Group by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) will bring together experts to share mangrove knowledge and develop conservation plans. The recently-established IUCN SSC Mangrove Specialist Group is going to develop a global conservation strategy for mangroves based on conservation needs. To support mangrove research and conservation projects, the group is bringing together experts to share their knowledge. READ MORE
 Editor's Note - MAP has been invited to attend.
AMERICAS
 
“We Aren’t Fighting Poverty Here, We’re Improving the Quality of Life”
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MEXICO - The residents of San Crisanto, a small communal village nestled in an idyllic setting in the southeastern Mexican state of Yucatán, have learned that valuing and protecting natural resources can generate employment and income. The San Crisanto initiative, which combines ecotourism and other economic activities, is a model for other communities located along Mexico’s Caribbean coast, which is rich in biodiversity but exposed to unpredictable weather hazards In 1995, Hurricanes Opal and Roxanne devastated the mangrove forests of San Crisanto, located 1,400 kilometers southeast of Mexico City. First the residents organised to repair the damages. Then they proceeded to strengthen the ecosystem against future threats by clearing channels through the mangrove, to allow water to flow through freely. “The mangrove forests recovered quickly, because the water currents carried nutrients to them. The more mangrove forests there are, the more birds, fish and crocodiles there are,” said José Loria, 56, the operations manager of the ejido, which created the San Crisanto Foundation in 2001.  READ MORE
 
Countervailing duties on imported shrimp could harm trade relations
USA - America’s favorite seafood is once again in the middle of an international trade conflict. This one pits U.S. fishermen and processors against seven foreign governments accused of giving shrimp exporters an unfair advantage, via subsidies, in a competitive market. Because when it comes to selling shrimp, price speaks loudest. And in a price battle between wild American shrimp and their pond-raised counterparts from Southeast Asia and South America, the domestic product almost always gets the short end of the stick.  Domestic shrimp companies cite an urgent need to protect the livelihoods of struggling harvesters and distributors from a crush of imports that dwarf their product in the marketplace by a 9-to-1 margin. The only way to level the playing field, they contend, is to seek tariff relief from the imports that have forced them to undercut their prices to compete or merely keep their businesses afloat. They’ve lost market share and jobs and fear the extinction of their proud, yet aging, industry. READ MORE
 
Tampering with our Future
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USA - Recently, Anne Mosness did an hour long radio interview on GE salmon and related topics, and the editor of the Cascade Weekly (a Washington paper) pressed her for an article a week before she thought it was going in.  “ While it might be rough, it describes serious consequences on coastal fisheries throughout our region if cheap/GE salmon flood markets in the future. Washington and our offshore waters are targeted for expanded industrial aquaculture which concerns folks from California to Alaska,” said Mosness. “Consumers need to be aware that U.S. food policies are undergoing huge changes and if they have concerns, they need to contact their legislators, members of Congress and the Food and Drug Administration. The potential for negative impacts on human health, the environment, traditional food producers and businesses make transparency, safeguards and regulations very important.” READ MORE
 
Sunset World Puts Together a Workshop on Mangrove Conservation
MEXICO - Thirty-six percent of Mexican mangroves have been changed or replaced, and the Yucatan’s Peninsula, home of 55% of them, also presents great damage on these costal ecosystems, caused by non-organized tourism, over-exploitation of species and human settlements. On the workshop titled “Introduction to the Management and Conservation of Mangroves” organized by the tourist group Sunset World Resorts & Vacation Experiences to commemorate World Wetlands Day, the Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources (Semarnat) in Mexico, added that the state of Quintana Roo have the second place on mangrove territory with 16%, only behind Campeche. READ MORE
 
 
OCEANA
 
Climate change a 'mixed bag' for Pacific Island fisheries and aquaculture 
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AUSTRALIA - An international, multidisciplinary team of scientists have combined their expertise to make projections for the future of tropical Pacific fisheries and aquaculture in the 21st century. Their research suggests that predicted climate change in the region will create winners and losers in both fisheries and aquaculture, requiring adaptation by many Pacific Island nations. Dr Janice Lough, Senior Principal Research Scientist of the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) was one of the team to collaborate on the project, co-ordinated through the Secretariat of the Pacific Community and part-funded by AusAID. As a specialist in marine climate projections and their consequences for human activities on coral reef ecosystems, Dr Lough provided insights into observed and possible future climates of the tropical Pacific. "It was extremely rewarding to be a part of this important project which is ultimately about assisting people and governments throughout the tropical Pacific in planning for future food security and economic prosperity," says Dr Lough. READ MORE
 
Hectares of Whangamata mangroves set to go
NEW ZEALAND – It's the beginning of the end for thousands of mangroves that have choked large parts of the harbour and estuary in Whangamata on the Coromandel Peninsula. Next week, Waikato Regional Council will begin removing over four hectares of mature mangrove plants. The Environment Court granted a consent last year to remove around 18 hectares of mangroves, that began spreading in the 1940's because of sedimentation from land clearance and development in the area. VIEW SOURCE
 
Mangrove Management plan revived
FIJI - The International Union For Conservation of Nature is reviving a twenty-seven year old Mangrove Management Plan in light of developments taking place around Fiji. IUCN Program Manager Milika Sobey says they’re working with the Lands Ministry to come up with methods that promote foreshore development, but at the same time protect mangroves. "The Mangrove managment plan will allow them to make informed decisions of which mangroves to perhaps convert, maybe calculating off sets – if you convert this patch of mangrove – what is the off set – are you going to conserve another area?” The revamped plan will guide the government on how to proceed with development that may endanger mangrove resources. READ MORE
 
LAST WORD
 
Thank you so much for your support and prayers for my husband, Anwar Sadat.
 
This overwhelming support has made me feel that I am not alone, and has given me the strength to move on. Many still care and believe in the fight represented by Anwar.
 
Because of you, 23 peasants have been released by the police. But 3 of them, Anwar, Dedek, and Kamaludin are still in custody. Please continue your support by sharing this petition (below) to the head of South Sumatera police through Facebook, Twitter, or Email.
 
The latest update, Anwar’s case has been sent to the prosecutor’s office, and he has now been transferred to Pakjo prison in Palembang. He is being charged under the Criminal Code Article 170 and being alleged of destroying the gate of the police station during a protest on land rights back in January 29th. However, the charge has no witness or evidence.
 
Everyday I await the release of Anwar. He is a victim of police brutality, his head was injured, he had a fat lip and bruised shoulders. He is only guilty for his passion in fighting for the rights of the marginalized peasants in the village of Betung Cinta Manis, that has been fighting for their land rights since 1982.
 
I am really dumbfounded on why he was arrested and detained. Why was his head bleeding? Why the bruises all over his body? Is helping the peasants a crime? He is not even granted bail! Where is the justice?
 
On March 4, 2013, my husband will begin to be heard in court. I invite you to spread a petition asking the court to release my husband Anwar Sadat, Dedek Chaniago and Kamaludin
 
Thank You,
 
Nitra Primiade A
Change.org.
View the petition  |  View and reply to this message online


~ If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com

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Mangrove Action Project

Saturday, March 2, 2013

MAP News Issue 309 March 2, 2013

VerticalResponse
 

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

The MAP News
309th Edition                                 March 2, 2013


Dedicated to the memory of MAP's Executive Director's father, Pasquale Alfred Quarto 1912-2013

Action Alerts:

earthdayadweb
Magnusun Series is proud to present the Earth Day Run. Come run and walk one of our many race distances and at the same time you can feel good about supporting the environment. This event takes action both locally and globally. CLICK HERE
 
Update from the Mangrove Action and Australian Shorelines CLICK HERE
 
An Interview with Honduran Environmentalist and Goldman Award Winner EN ESPANOL

WE NEED HELP! – Stop Bombing Indonesia’s Mentawai Reefs!
VIEW THE VIDEO THEN
SIGN THE PETITION 
 
URGENT ALERT! Mangrove International Action Needed for Reversing Brazil's Forest Code READ MORE AND VIEW SAMPLE LETTER
Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video
Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE” Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

CALLING FOR MANGROVE ART SUBMISSIONS!

We invite all primary school children from tropical and sub-tropical nations, and whose schools are located near mangroves, to create art telling us "why mangroves are important to me and my community". Selected winners will be published in a 2014 calendar to be distributed internationally to raise awareness of mangrove forest ecology. Email
monicagquarto@olympus.net or mangroveap@olympus.net

Phulbari Coal Mine Blog View Blog
Phulbari Update – NEW Watch Short Video
MAP's 2014 Children's Mangrove Art Calendar sponsors needed. View PDF
Support MAP Through Art

Support MAP through Art!
Enma-Saiz
Enma Saiz has released only 50 signed reproductions.
Read More

Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier
Donate.jpg

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE


URGENT - VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

JOIN MAP! Immediate Internship Opportunity - Consumer awareness campaign at an international environmental NGO – SEATTLE AREAREAD MORE

MAP is looking for volunteer interns for its Thailand Headquarters – READ MORE

MAP’s VOLUNTEER INTERNS HELP MAP MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE
READ MORE

 


MANGROVE ISSUES 

MANGROVE BOOK – J. Primavera
The book Beach Forests and Mangrove Associates in the Philippines by J.H. Pimavera and R.B. Sadaba (ISBN 978-971-9931-01-0; National Library  CIP QK938.C6  581.75109599  2012  P220120602) is now available. aves, flowers, fruits, utilization and silviculture
.
SEE POSTER and order instructions

View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT THESE SIGHTS
SLIDE SHOW
    VIMEO SHOW

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine -
Read More
 


"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog

Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin

LISTEN TO INTERVIEW


Join MAP on Facebook


Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp


Donate.jpg


Not yet a MAP News subscriber?
Click here to subscribe.



Note to Our Readers:
We strive to keep active links in our newsletter. However, due to circumstances beyond our control,
occasionally links to stories may become broken. If you find a link to a story is not functioning, please cut and paste the headline into your browser search bar. In most cases you should be able to locate the original story.



One Percent for the Planet Recipient Logo

 


Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:

Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games

Visit the Mangrove Action Project recycle website Click on the recycle button then click on the Download Shipping Label, and follow the instructions.

 

download_shipping_label

FEATURED STORY

Our taste for prawns is killing the sea
STN2409FISH2_326728k
U.K. - British supermarkets are selling prawns reared using a technique that is destroying vast swathes of the ocean’s ecosystem, according to an investigation by the celebrity cook Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. Tesco, Morrisons and the Co-op have admitted buying prawns from a company owned by a Thai billionaire that feeds the shellfish with “trash fish” — sea creatures that cannot be sold at market. Catching trash fish involves the use of fine nets that scoop up all the sea life in a given area, including crabs, stingrays, turtles, shark species and young fish. The entire haul is then ground up and incinerated in a series of hot ovens until it turns into a powder that is fed to prawns kept in giant farms. The indiscriminate technique means many fish are prevented from growing to full size and the sea life in whole sections of ocean is destroyed. READ MORE
 
ASIA
 
Sundarbans: Nature's bioshield
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BANGLADESH - Stretching along the coastline of India and Bangladesh, this complex maze of mangrove trees and waterways mark the area where land meets the sea and freshwater meets seawater. Wildllife thrive in this unique and delicately balanced ecosystem and it is home to large numbers of mammals, birds and fish. It is also one of the largest haunts of the endangered Royal Bengal tiger. But the Sundarbans value extends beyond just providing a habitat for these magnificent animals; it also protects the densely populated Bay of Bengal from cyclones and the worst extremes of nature. Yet, it is now threatened by man’s activities, including land reclamation, logging and shrimp farming. In fact, this vast tract of mud and tangles of roots is now being destroyed faster than almost any other ecosystem on Earth, removing this essential barrier and the rich habitat.  This short film reveals the wildlife this strange and magical forest supports and explores the hidden strengths that make it such an effective coastal defence. VIEW 4 MINUTE VIDEO

 
Yet another environmental crusader slain
THAILAND - Yet another self-made environmental protection activist has fallen – this time at the hand of a gunman believed to have been hired by local businessmen and politicians involved in the dumping of toxic industrial waste in Chachoengsao province. The victim, 43-year old Prajob Nao-opas, was village headman of moo 14, tambon Nong Haen, Phanom Sarakham district. He was murdered in broad daylight on Monday by a gunman at an automobile garage on the Phanom Sarakham-Ban Sang road as he was waiting for mechanics to complete repairs to his pickup truck. Witnesses told police the gunman and another man arrived at the garage in  a black Honda Accord. Both of them approached Prajob and one of them  fired four shots from an 11mm semi-automatic pistol at the headman, who died shortly after he was rushed to the district hospital. The two killers escaped in their car. READ MORE
 
Eco club Student’s Success in International Children’s Mangrove Art Contest
MAPStudent
INDIA - Ananya Atmaja Mohapatra, a 14 year old 10th grade student at MN High School, in Pattamundai, Odisha, India has placed 1st position for India in the International Children’s Mangrove Art contest 2013 conducted by USA based organization Mangrove Action Project (MAP). In addition, Sri Nirakar Lenka, age 12 of Shivananda Vidya Mandir, Rajnagar school, and 13 year-old Sri Om Prakash of Panda Kundupur U.P. School, Kundapur placed second and third respectively.  On behalf of MAP, we the Action for Protection Of Wild Animals (APOWA) conducted this art contest in 19 coastal schools of Kendrapara district. This event has enhanced awareness level not only amongst the students, but also the members of their families on the important role that mangrove forests play in the lives of the coastal communities in particular and for coastal life in general. READ MORE
 
Fishermen blockade Trang port
THAILAND – Angry fishermen in around 80 longtail boats blocked the entry to a port in Trang province on Monday in protest at the actions of fisheries patrol boats, which have been destroying or removing illegal fishing nets, according to a report in Thai Rath. The government's Department of Fisheries has assigned patrol boats, known as Green Leaf Boats, to stop local fishermen using drift nets - nets which float freely on the surface of the water. These nets are illegal because they frequently entangle non-targeted marine life, often endangered species, not just commercial fish. The protesting fishermen said the Green Leaf Boats last week removed 300 drift nets in Trang's Kantang district and cost them more than 300,000 baht. The protesters said their income had fallen as a consequence and urged the patrol boats to stop interfering with their efforts to earn a living. READ MORE
 
Dark days ahead for shrimp supply as EMS ravages Asia
THAILAND - Early mortality syndrome, better known as EMS -- or Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Syndrome, (AHPNS) as scientist refer to it -- has reportedly reached disastrous levels in eastern Thailand. “Thailand’s production for 2013 is expected to be anywhere between 25 to 35 percent less than 2012,” Jim Gulkin, managing director of Siam Canadian told IntraFish. “That is very significant.” The drop in Thai shrimp exports to the United States in 2012 is expected to represent the lowest volume sold in nearly 10 years. “Production problems in shrimp are occurring in China, Vietnam, Thailand and Indonesia due to diseases,” Gulkin said. “The worrying factor of EMS is that up until now, neither the origins nor the causes of the disease are known and therefore there is no known remedy at this time.” READ MORE
 
What Asia's shrimp crisis means for the  US
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Thailand makes up $1.2 billion (€901 million) of the $4.5 billion (€3.4 billion) in shrimp the United States imports, according to data from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), so any hits the industry takes directly affects the US market. In the past year, the industry has been hit  by disease, possible countervailing duties and the rise of Ecuadorian production, so 2013 is sure to be a tough one for shrimp prices in the United States, Jim Gulkin, managing director at Siam Canadian, told IntraFish. He predicts Thai shrimp production will be down 40 to 50 percent during the first half of 2013. If the country has a good recovery -- and he stressed that's a big if -- and makes up some ground in the last six months, the whole year will still be down 25 to 35 percent in production. READ MORE
 
China criticizes US investigations into shrimp
CHINA - On Wednesday, China’s Ministry of Commerce criticized US investigations into Chinese shrimp exports, saying the investigation is a violation of WTO rules. A ministry spokesman said US is classifying China as a non-market economy, and there is no good evidence to justify the investigation. The U.S. Coalition of Gulf Shrimp Industries alleged that producers and exporters in China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam have received financial assistance from their governments. The US International Trade Commission has launched investigations to determine whether this is true and what duties should be imposed in response. Chinese exporter Guolian Aquatic has engaged a panel of lawyers to challenge the investigations. READ MORE
 
Malaysia's tsunami buffer zone takes shape
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MALAYSIA - The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake unleashed the deadliest tsunami in history and its catastrophic effects were felt by 14 nations, including Malaysia.  The tsunami, which was the result of a 9.1-9.3 Mw earthquake, destroyed the coastlines of Sumatra in Indonesia, Tamil Nadu in India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Somalia in Africa.  More than a quarter of a million people lost their lives and many coastal townships were decimated.  People learnt a number of lessons from this tragedy. They learnt that some of the shorelines in several countries were facing open seas. Therefore, these countries decided to enclose their shores in the most innovative way.  They created buffer zones comprising mangrove forests.  Malaysia reacted quickly by rolling out mangrove planting programmes with the help of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment on 14 April 2005.  READ MORE

Myanmar resumes export to US after sanctions
MYANMAR – Myanmar resumes export to the U.S following the easing and lifting of international sanctions, Myanmar Fishery Federation (MFF) said. One of the Myanmar fishery companies, Ocean Harvest (Myanmar) Limited has exported 17 tonnes of frozen saltwater shrimp to Red Chamber Company located in Los Angles, California. "We used to export fish and fishery products to the U.S before the sanctions. This export is the first time after the sanction was lifted," managing director Myat Aung Nyunt of Ocean Harvest. “During the sanction period, we have been exporting our products to Asian countries including Japan and Hong Kong, he said. READ MORE
 
Gorontalo’s mangrove forests in dire need of protection
INDONESIA - The Tanjung Panjang Nature Reserve in Patuhu village, Rangangan, Pohuwato regency, Gorontalo, is becoming increasingly degraded as almost the entire mangrove conservation area has been converted into an aquaculture area, aimed at fish and shrimp farming. Rahman Dako from Tomini Bay Sustainable Coastal and Livelihood Management (SUSCLAM), an NGO focusing on mangrove conservation and coastal community empowerment, said the opening of fish farms in the Tanjung Panjang Nature Reserve had taken place on a massive scale for a long time. “Of the 3,000 hectares making up the Tanjung Panjang Nature Reserve, only around 600 hectares remain intact, as the remainder have been converted into aquaculture areas,” Rahman said, adding that Tanjung Panjang played an important role as a buffer area and sustainable coastal ecosystem for Tomini Bay. READ MORE

EUROPE
 
Economic imperative for protecting mangrove ecosystems
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U.N. – Experts are urging policymakers to conserve mangrove forests and recognise their essential services to nature and humanity alike, saying that shrimp farms and development activities leading to their replacement will be a bad economic trade-off both in the short and longer terms. Organisations from the forestry and conservation sector and those linked to the United Nations (UN) have released a policy-brief based on the 2nd edition of the World Atlas of Mangroves (2010). It aims to provide managers with lessons learned in the past mangrove conservation and management efforts along with policy recommendations. Found mostly in the tropics straddling land and sea, mangroves account for less than half the one per cent forests of all kinds worldwide. Taken together, some 70 species of mangroves are found in 123 tropical and sub-tropical nations and territories but they occupy just 152,000 square km in total-an area slightly larger than Nepal. READ MORE
 
AMERICAS
 
Volunteers clean up and plant some 200 mangrove seedlings at Little Key
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ST. MAARTEN - An energetic group of volunteers cleaned-up Little Key in Simpson Bay Lagoon and then planted Red Mangroves seedling along the shoreline on Saturday together with Environmental Protection in the Caribbean (EPIC), St. Maarten Pride Foundation and The Yacht Club at Isle de Sol staff. This was part of EPIC's Love the Lagoon programme, which brings attention to the need to protect St. Maarten's few remaining wetlands (ponds and lagoons) and the last surviving mangrove stands of the lagoon. Saturday's clean-up and tree planting event was one of a number of activities EPIC and Pride will continue to undertake this month as part of the foundations' World Wetlands Day activities. These activities include school presentations, excursions, clean-ups and tree planting events. READ MORE
 
Mexico’s Congress seek to amend law on mangroves
MEXICO - The president of the Tourism Commission of the Chamber of Deputies, Rodolfo Dorador announced that the modification of Article 60 in Law TER General Wildlife (LGVS), which protects mangroves in Mexico, at the request of employers, who argue that along with the Mexican Official Standard 059 which reclassified the mangrove category, inhibit the development of tourism and investment. "Let's just get to 60 TER squarely to stop being an impediment and entrepreneurs can build in the mangroves," he said in the context of the meeting between representatives of the country's leading business organizations and members of the committees of Tourism of the House of Representatives and Senators, local legislators and members of the Legislative Council of Tourism (Conletur). During the first day of formal activities XI National Tourism Forum, held in Cancun, the president of the Mexican Resort Development Association (AMDETUR) Romárico Arroyo Marroquin, was referred to the time when the legal framework allowed removing mangroves, offsetting the extent to reforest mangroves elsewhere (via mitigation). READ MORE
READ ORIGINAL EN ESPANOL
 
Fish mislabeling widespread in U.S.
U.S.A. - The mislabeling of fish is widespread across the U.S., a shocking new study has revealed. Ocean conservation group group Oceana analyzed the DNA of 1,215 seafood samples from 674 retail outlets in 21 states between 2010 and 2012. Their research showed that 33 percent all samples were mislabeled, according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines. One alarming discovery shows that a huge amount of fish sold as 'white tuna' is actually escolar, a fish that causes uncontrollable, oily, orange diarrhea. The study found mislabeling in 27 of the 46 seafood types tested. It revealed that 59 percent of fish sold as tuna in U.S. restaurants and grocery stores is not actually tuna. Only snapper, mislabeled 87 percent of the time and in reality any one of six different species, was sold fraudulently more often. READ MORE
 
LAST WORD
 
Greetings from Action for Protection Of Wild Animals (APOWA) in India!
 
We would like to thank you for sending the appreciation certificates & calendars for the winning student participants in MAP's International Children’s Art Contest 2013.
 
In this connection, we have organized a congratulatory meeting and awarded the certificates and calendars. (SEE STORY ABOVE)
 
Thanks and Kind regards,
 
Bijaya Kumar Kabi
Director, APOWA
 
Action for Protection of Wild Animals (APOWA)
At-Hatapatana, PO-Kadaliban, Dist.-Kendrapara
Odisha, Pin-754222, India
Tel.-+916729 225908
E-mail- apowa1999@yahoo.co.in
www.apowa.org.in

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