Saturday, August 17, 2019

MAP News Issue 475 - Aug 17, 2019

Mangrove Action Project
The MAP News
475th Edition                                                     August 17, 2019

FEATURE

Cameras Reveal Secret Lives of Mangrove Stingrays
Mangrove Whiptail Ray
USA - James Cook University scientists have filmed stingray activity in mangroves for the first time, revealing how different species use the underwater forests and how important the environment is for the animal’s survival. JCU PhD candidate Shiori Kanno led the study, which placed three cameras on mangrove beds at Orpheus Island and produced more than 400 hours of video featuring more than 600 stingrays. She said habitat use and behavioural patterns of stingrays within mangrove areas are poorly understood and the reason why some stingrays favour them is unclear. “We urgently need this knowledge, especially for juvenile animals that are dependent on mangroves because habitat loss may have significant consequences for population survival,” said Ms Kanno. The research team monitored mangrove use by juvenile mangrove whiprays and cowtail stingrays. It was the first time the video technique had been applied. It revealed mangrove whiprays lived up to their name and spent a lot more time in the mangrove forests than cowtail stingrays. She said the movement of sharks capable of preying on juvenile stingrays was also recorded and the scientists found the predators rarely swam amongst the mangrove roots. “We saw no sharks amongst the mangroves over summer and only four in winter. So, predator avoidance is one possible driver of why whiprays use mangroves – sharks big enough to eat them just can’t get into the root system and it offers effective protection. READ MORE

GLOBAL

Celebrating Mangroves – the super ecosystem of the tropics
Mangrove roots
GLOBAL - These forests have a special place in my heart, making the work I have done on this ecosystem very personal and rewarding. Between university years, I did fieldwork in the so- called “mosquito-ridden and muddy” mangroves of northern Madagascar and absolutely loved it. The soothing scent of rich silt is the prevailing aroma of the mangroves, and the mud provides an excellent and free spa treatment. Furthermore, numerous marine species, including fish and shrimp are known to use the shelter provided by mangroves as nurseries while they mature. They feed on leaf scraps and microorganisms, all while hiding from predators in the thick tangles of roots. Due to the alien and unusual characteristics of the mangroves, I found my attention constantly divided between appreciating the trees and their intertwined roots and marveling at the vibrant world of crabs and mudskippers living under and above the surface. Knowing that mangrove populations are dwindling, I recall feeling bittersweet as I ventured through the beautiful ecosystem that could be so much more. I am not the only one who finds these forests amazing and valuable. According to UN estimates, over 100 million people live in proximity to mangroves. These dynamic ecosystems provide approximately US$33-57,000 per hectare per year of income to national economies in services like coastal protection, food and medicines. READ MORE

Mangrove conservation more valuable than ever thanks to carbon trading
Carbon Bank mangroves
GLOBAL - The UN Environment Programme, the Kenya Forest Service, the Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute and partners recently launched the Vanga Blue Forests Project on the Kenyan coast through the Global Environment Facility Blue Forests Project and the International Coral Reef Initiative/UN Environment coral reefs small grants programme, a groundbreaking initiative to trade carbon credits from mangrove conservation and restoration. It will restore over 4,000 hectares of mangroves in Kwale County and support the livelihoods of over 8,000 people in fishing communities. The management plan includes the sale of carbon credits on the voluntary carbon market. The initiative builds on the success of a similar project in Gazi, a community just a few kilometers north, which has been trading mangrove carbon credits on the Voluntary Carbon Market since 2012. READ MORE

AFRICA

Foni-Community Benefits From Massive Mangrove Rehabilitation
Gambian mangrove planting
GAMBIA - All Gambia Forestry Platform in partnership with the community of Jomo Kunda village in the Foni Kansala District, over the weekend embarked on massive mangrove restoration on the river Bank. The 'Alkalo' of Jomo Kunda, Yaya Jarju, expressed appreciation of the bold restoration initiatives; that the exercise is a big boost for the development of his village at a time when he is the village head. He said the restoration of the mangrove has been a concern for his villagers in the sense that when the riverside was full of mangrove, fish was abundant; but that due to human activities and climate change, the environment has faced serious degradation. He used the opportunity to commend his community for their active participation during the exercise and challenged them to continue the hard work and plant more trees especially mangrove plants which is vital in fish breeding. He commended the NEMA- Chosso project under the Ministry of Agriculture for the support rendered toward the realizing of the project. He described the exercise as a step in the right direction towards the restoration of their environment. He appealed to the Nema-Chosso project to extend their support toward such projects in their community and acknowledge the effort of Ebrima Camara for initiating the exercise. READ MORE

Ethiopia plants over 350 million trees in a day, setting new world record
Ethiopian Replant Record
ETHIOPIA - In a record-breaking day, at the Gulele Botanical Garden in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia launched an historic tree planting campaign. Over 350 million trees were planted in an ambitious move to counter the effects of deforestation and climate change. The event is part of Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s Green Legacy Initiative. It aimed at planting 200 million trees in a single day in 1,000 sites across the country. Prime Minister Ahmed congratulated the country for not only meeting its collective Green Legacy goal but also exceeding it. Ethiopia's Minister of Innovation and Technology Getahun Mekuria was quoted saying that more than 350 million trees were planted in 12 hours, breaking the world record held by India since 2016, for the most trees planted in one day and which stood at 50 million trees. The tree planting event was attended by a representative of the UN Environment Programme’s Liaison Office to Africa Union Commission, UN Economic Commission for Africa and representative to Ethiopia, and whose support for this ambitious action was crucial, as well as other United Nations Agencies and various international organizations. READ MORE

AMERICAS

Rising Sea Levels Could Accelerate Florida Bay Mangrove Loss
Rising Sea Levels Florida
USA - Florida has lost much of the mangrove forests that once bordered its coasts and estuaries to development and sea-level rise. Current rates of sea-level rise combined with increasing climate variability could accelerate the loss of mangrove-lined coastlines, according to new USGS research published in the journal Nature Communications. These findings will help resource managers understand whether mangrove-forested islands and shorelines can be maintained as the climate changes and sea levels rise and how water management may help mitigate these changes.“From previous studies, we know that the mangrove zone in South Florida shifted inland as sea level rose and estuaries covered what was previously mangrove forest during the late Holocene,” said USGS research geologist Miriam Jones, the study’s lead author. “This new research is one of the most detailed studies to pinpoint how fast the transition from mangrove forest to estuary happened during that time.” The USGS research comes at a time when state and federal government agencies and many other partners are undertaking one of the world’s largest and most ambitious ecosystem restoration efforts: to help recover the health and natural productivity of the Greater Everglades ecosystem, which includes Florida Bay.READ MORE

DEP sends Cape Coral warning letter over destroyed mangroves
Cape Coral Florida
USA - Mangroves and vegetation is ripped from the ground along a Cape Coral canal and neighbors are upset, but now, so is the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. The City told people living along the canal that crews were just getting rid of invasive trees but last week neighbors said they weren’t buying that. In a two page warning letter, the DEP called out the City of Cape Coral over dredging and clearing along the Coral Point Canal. Joanne Payne is just one of the neighbors who immediately started searching for answers when she saw construction workers tearing out mangroves across from her house, in Cape Coral’s Four Mile Cove Preserve. In the letter sent Tuesday to the City and the property owner, Ripple Lake LLC, investigators list four possible violations. They include failure to install and utilize best management practices during in-water construction and unauthorized mangrove alteration. The DEP calls the violation serious and “Intends to pursue formal enforcement in this matter … Restoration of the shoreline and wetlands will be required, as well as civil penalties”. READ MORE

EARTHCARE joins with Earth Successor, Qiantang River Waterkeeper, and Waterkeepers Bahamas to plant mangroves
Planting_mangroves__a_joint_project__________between_The_Bahamas_and_China
BAHAMAS - Early on the morning of August 3rd, EARTHCARE Eco Kids and Volunteers joined with Earth Successor, Qiantang River Waterkeeper, and Waterkeepers Bahamas to plant mangroves in order to Drawdown Climate Change. It was a wonderful morning of caring for the earth and fellowship. Cultures joined together in a common cause, caring for our Mother Earth. Sustainable Development Goals 13 Climate Action, 15 Life on Land and 17 Partnerships for the Goals were achieved during this project. This visit and collaboration was sponsored by Save The Bays, who is an advocate for stronger environmental laws and enforcement of those laws in The Bahamas. The contingent from China was made up of 25 persons, which resulted in a total of 45 Volunteers who planted 300 Mangroves. Hao Xin, Executive Director of Qiantang River Waterkeeper and Wu Yiwen, Beijing National Day School presented an elated EARTHCARE Founder, Gail Woon, with a beautiful, genuine silk scarf from China in appreciation for the Mangrove Planting partnership. READ MORE

ASIA

A common survival strategy for the Sunderbans
Sundarbans
BANGLADESH - A memorandum of understanding on conservation of the Sunderban is in place since September 2011; yet a common understanding of what constitutes the Sunderban is elusive. The MoU recognizes that the natural areas of the Sunderban are greatly influenced by human use and by the people living in tracts adjoining the forest. These tracts, cleared during colonial times, are now home to over 7.2 million people. Till date, while the Joint Working Group constituted under the MoU has met only once, thousands of hectares of land have been lost due to accelerating sea level rise and erosion. Consequently, people are being displaced both physically and occupationally. The processes are also reducing forestlands that sustain the Royal Bengal tiger. The pace of environmental change and that of conventional bilateral diplomacy are asynchronous. READ MORE

The wolf of Bangladesh: A true story
Indian_Wolf
BANGLADESH - For Muntasir Akash, it all started with a photo in a news report in early June. The photo showed a canine-like animal, beaten and dead, legs splayed, hanging from makeshift posts. It was killed by local people in the remote village of Taltoli in the Bangladeshi Sundarbans, the world’s largest mangrove forest, straddling both Bangladesh and India. “Here the story begins,” says Akash, a wildlife biologist at the University of Dhaka. What first struck this expert on carnivorous mammals most was the dead animal’s “white patch around the cheek and throat.” Akash sent emails to his colleagues, Jan Kamler and William Duckworth, both of whom agreed with Akash’s initial suspicion: the animal was a wolf. The only problem? There are no wolves in Bangladesh.Not only are wolves not supposed to be in Bangladesh anymore, they aren’t supposed to be in the Sundarbans either. Indian wolves are creatures of the grasslands, scrub, deciduous forests and the areas between wilderness and agriculture. Still, this wasn’t the first wolf recently found among the dense, muddy, watery mangroves. In 2017, wildlife photographer Riddhi Mukherjee took a remarkable photo of a wolf on the Indian side of the Sundarbans, more than 300 kilometers (190 miles) from the nearest known wolf population in Purulia district. READ MORE

OCEANA

Sea levels threaten Australian mangroves
Sea Level Threat
AUSTRALIA - Swampy, muddy and full of mosquitoes. Mangroves offer an environment not entirely pleasurable for many. But for a mangrove researcher at Charles Darwin University, it is worth a visit. For Madeline Goddard, ecosystems such as the one in northern Australia are essential to the survival of the planet. “I think historically, they’ve had a rough patch, but I think the more we learn about them, the more we discover their importance and how many ecosystem services they provide’‘, Goddard said. In addition to providing habitat for marine life, mangrove forests are a reservoir of carbon. “So they absorb all this sunlight, convert it into energy, grow the leaves and, yes, the carbon stays in the system. He falls off the tree, falls to the ground, buries himself, and the carbon stays in the mud”, she added. As the global climate warms, and polar ice caps melt, the “sea bed” is expected to rise around the world. Thus encompass many tropical mangroves by the end of the century, if they do not adapt. Expert say the solution lies in protect the surrounding land so that mangrove forests can extend inland. READ MORE

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ACTION ALERTS

LAST CHANCE TO VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE PHOTO Mangrove Action Day Photography Voting underwayCLICK HERE

69 million tons of carbon stored thanks to mangrove restoration, as demonstrated by the new Mangrove Restoration Map VIEW MAP HERE

Keep loggers out of Selous Game Reserve!
Tanzania’s government is moving ahead with its plans for a hydroelectric dam in Selous Game Reserve. A huge swath of the UNESCO World Heritage site and habitat of iconic African wildlife would suffer irreparable damage. 1,500 km2 – an area the size of London – has just been opened to logging. Please help us protect Selous. SIGN PETITION

Don't trash coral reefs for the cruise industry! - TAKE ACTION

Sea turtles or condominiums?
Sand mining and construction work would wipe out a marine biodiversity hotspot and destroy the livelihoods of local people, who have not been consulted. Please SIGN!


Save Penang! Reject the 3-Islands Reclamation
The lack of public consultation and detailed information about the project is shocking in view of the size of proposed reclamation which is 4,500 acres or 7 square miles
PLEASE SIGN

Save Pulau Kukup National Park - second largest mangrove island in the world. Sign The Petition

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UPCOMING EVENTS

2019 Environmental Science and Climate Change Conference September 10-11, 2019
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Restoring natural forests
Restoring The Natural Mangrove Forest
Watch movie

Tanzania CBEMR
Community Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration in Rufiji Delta 
VIEW VIDEO

Video: Mangroves for the Future - A look bacK. As the latest phase of Mangroves for the Future (MFF) draws to a close, this video highlights some of the project’s most successful initiatives – from local women supporting national park management in Viet Nam to an island in the Maldives that has become a model for waste management, and everything in between. View Here

Making the case for Emergency Climate Change Action

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MAP 2019 Children’s Calendar  CLICK HERE

You can help ensure that the knowledge and skills needed to conserve and restore mangroves is preserved in coastal communities READ MORE

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VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY

VOLUNTEER WITH MAP


MANGROVE ISSUES 

Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION

What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

What is EPIC? - The Ecosystems Protecting Infrastructure and Communities (EPIC) project:  the role of ecosystems as protective barriers against climate induced hazards

MANGROVES APP AVAILABLE
A pictorial field guide for easy identification of various mangrove species and learning about the mangroves ecosystem. CLICK HERE

View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  
WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

The Value of Mangrove Forests View Video

CBEMR Experience Exchange MAP 2017 English Subtitles
VIEW THE VIDEO

Mangroves: Guidebook to MalaysiaClick Here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE

SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".

Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
EPIC-Film 2
 
Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more


Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

The Marvellous Mangroves Education Forum is an online hub for those utilizing the Marvellous Mangroves (MM) Curriculum. It gives students, teachers and anyone interested in mangroves, the opportunity to learn and share ideas themed around the curriculum, to connect and communicate with others around the globe whilst exploring mangroves from your computer or on the go. VISIT

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The award-winning Marvellous Mangroves (MM) curriculum educates children on the importance of mangroves and their ecological functions, teaching them about modern challenges and mechanisms for sustainability. VIEW VIDEO

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

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Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW
VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More


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Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE


 Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE


"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp


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Mangrove Action Project

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Saturday, August 3, 2019

MAP News Issue 474 - August 3, 2019

Mangrove Action Project
The MAP News
474th Edition                                                     August 03, 2019

FEATURE

Mangrove Action Day Photography Voting Underway
M-and-W-1000x800
Mark Kevin C. Badayos // Philippines
GLOBAL – MAP's recent call for photographs for World Mangrove Day 2019 is raising awareness of the important connections people have with mangrove forests.Throughout the month of July, we asked for and received 250 stunning photos from 30 countries around the world that highlighted mangrove ecosystems and their important contributions to communities and the environment. The theme for this year was #MangrovesMatter. July 26th marked the 20th anniversary of World Mangrove Day, now recognized by UNESCO as the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystems. This historic day commemorated Greenpeace activist Hayhow Daniel Nanoto, who died during a massive protest to re-establish the mangrove wetlands in Ecuador. For the last 26 years, the Mangrove Action Project has celebrated this day with a commitment to action in defense of the mangroves and the communities that rely on them. We would like to thank each and every person who contributed to this project! Winners will be announced in late August and there is also a People’s Choice Award that is given out to the photo with the most votes. Enjoy the photos and vote for your favourite!  VIEW PHOTOS


GLOBAL

International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem 2019: Theme and Significance of the Day
Mangroves-Day
GLOBAL - The General Conference of the UNESCO, at its 38th session, passed a resolution to adopt July 28, as the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem. The UNESCO's proclamation states that, "Considering that mangroves are a unique, special and vulnerable ecosystem, providing by virtue of their existence, biomass and productivity substantial benefits to human beings, providing forestry, fishery goods and services as well as contributing to the protection of the coastline and being particularly relevant in terms of mitigation of the effects of climate change and food security for local communities." International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem 2019: Why Protecting Mangroves Is Important for our Environment. Mangrove forests only grow at tropical and subtropical latitudes near the equator where temperatures are comparatively warmed. They cannot grow in freezing temperatures. Mangroves are important to thwart natural disasters like storms, tsunamis, erosions and any other similar intervention. Mangroves are depleting are a faster pace today due to rapid industrialisation, pollution and demand for housing. It is important for citizens and local governments to take initiative to be aware of the issue and save the further destruction of the mangrove ecosystem. READ MORE

AFRICA

How is new 'solar salt' technology saving Guinean mangroves?
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GUINEA - In Dubréka, Guinea, salt production used to involve cutting down mangroves to burn as fuelwood. Now, a new project is using solar technology to extract salt in a safer, more sustainable way that is already allowing mangroves to regrow. The 38,000 hectares of mangroves in Guinea’s Dubréka prefecture are seriously threatened by salt extraction and sand mining, which are the main sources of income for nearby communities. The mangroves are being cleared to make way for mines or cut down as fuelwood for the salt extraction process. Now, a new project is working to protect the wetlands by educating salt producers, most of whom are women, on how to extract salt from the mangroves sustainably. New technology enables the production of salt using sunlight and tarpaulins instead of fuelwood. With financial support from the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund and local nonprofit organization Developpement Pour Tous (DPT), working in partnership with Fondation Agir Pour l’Afrique (FAPA), this technique not only protects the mangroves but eliminates the safety risks that come with harvesting fuelwood. READ MORE

Mangrove conservation more valuable than ever thanks to carbon trading
Kenyan mangroves
KENYA - When a proven ecosystem restoration method also helps reduce poverty and build economic resilience, governments will often back them as a win-win solution. The UN Environment Programme, the Kenya Forest Service, the Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute and partners recently launched the Vanga Blue Forests Project on the Kenyan coast, a groundbreaking initiative to trade carbon credits from mangrove conservation and restoration. “The whole of this village and other nearby villages depend on fishing. And the mangrove forest is the actual breeding area for the fish,” says Vanga chief Kama Abdallah. “If the mangroves are destroyed there would be hunger,” adds Vanga resident Mwasiti Salim. “The project will conserve and restore over 4,000 hectares of mangroves in Kwale County and support the livelihoods of over 8,000 people in fishing communities in the area through community development initiatives,” he adds. READ MORE

AMERICAS

Rising sea levels are destroying coastal towns in Honduras – and shrimp farms which export to the UK and US are making it worse
Honduran Shrimp Farms
HONDURAS - Golden beaches once helped transform this fishing community on the Gulf of Fonseca into a thriving tourist destination. Nowadays, however, there are barely a few metres of sand left, and rising water levels and tidal surges have wiped out roads, homes and businesses. Locals estimate that around a metre of ground is lost every year – which means this entire community will soon be under water. The same predicament is faced by settlements along the Pacific coast of Honduras, where land and its people are disappearing fast. Sea levels are rising around the world, but in this region another local factor is helping speed up coastal degradation: swathes of mangrove forests have been destroyed to make way for industrial shrimp farms which have proliferated even inside protected reserves. Many Honduran shrimps are exported to the US and the UK, where they are sold in major supermarket chains including Waitrose, Sainsbury’s and Marks & Spencer. “The industry destroys huge mangrove sites promising development, but actually creates very few jobs – and actually increases poverty by restricting fishing access for locals,” said Dina Morel, director of a local marine conservation organization, known by its acronym Coddeffagolf. READ MORE

ASIA

The Fantastic Fishing Cat
Jumping Fishing Cat
SOUTHEAST ASIA - In the mangroves across South and SouthEast Asia lives a small, secretive felid. It emerges just as the sun goes down, and begins its nightly hunting expedition. This cat is so rare, many people living alongside it don’t even realise it is there. There are so few recorded sightings of this cat in the wild we don’t even know just how many there are. Best estimates put this mangrove cat as being even more endangered than the tiger. This is the story of the fishing cat and the people who are trying to save it. Unfortunately, these little cats are in big danger. Their biggest threat actually lies on your supermarket shelf, and you may be surprised to learn just what it is. Next time you go shopping I want you to go down the seafood aisle and take a look at a packet of prawns. Most of them will say “product of Thailand” or “India” or somewhere else in Asia. Now what they don’t tell you on the packet is how those prawns got there. So let me tell you. These prawns come from what’s called a ‘shrimp farm’ as you can see in the picture below. READ MORE

Big aquaculture bulldozes Borneo
Borneo Mangrove Destruction
MALAYSIA - "Do you think we can find any food in this place now?" asked Bondien, a village leader of the Tombonuo people. "The company thinks it can do anything it wants — that we don't count." The company is Sunlight Inno Seafood. Owned by Cedric Wong King Ti, a Malaysian businessman known as "King Wong," it has bulldozed swaths of mangroves in the Tombonuo's homeland in northern Borneo to make space for plastic-lined ponds filled with millions of king prawns. The shrimp are destined to be fattened for three months, scooped up in nets, quick frozen, packed into 40-foot refrigerated containers and loaded onto cargo ships bound for distant ports. Gargantuan as it may seem to Bondien and his relatives, the project represents only a speck in the global aquaculture industry, one of the world's fastest-growing sources of protein. Unfolding across Asia and around the world, this revolution in farming could help mitigate the impacts of climate change — or make them even worse. READ MORE

Sinking Jakarta needs giant sea wall
Jakarta Sea Walls
INDONESIA - Indonesia's president said in an interview that he wants to see the speedy construction of a giant sea wall around Jakarta to prevent the low-lying capital from sinking under the sea, lending renewed backing and a sense of urgency to a slow-moving and politically contested mega project. President Joko Widodo and his government are up against a tight timetable, including a forecast by experts that at the current rate, one-third of Jakarta could be submerged by 2050. The existential crisis facing the city is the culmination of decades of unfettered development, almost nonexistent urban planning and misrule by city politicians who have served private interests over those of the public. Lacking a comprehensive piped water network, industry and homeowners have tapped into the city's aquifers, causing rapid subsidence in northern Jakarta, home to several million people. In this area, the swampy ground has been sinking at an average of about 10 centimetres a year. Rising sea levels from a heated-up planet will compound the problem in decades to come. READ MORE

How the Women of Indonesia Rose up Against Land Grabbing
Indonesian Women
INDONESIA - One night in 2013, in East Borneo, the family of Lusang Arang was surprised by an unexpected visitor at their home. The visitor’s arrival at midnight was not the only thing that surprised the family; what he brought was even more startling: a large bag full of cash. Lusang Arang’s wife quickly decided what to do. She sneaked out and called out the other women of the village, who immediately gathered around the house, bringing their sleeping children in their arms. It was the guest’s turn to be surprised; he obviously didn’t expect a large audience at that time of night. The women all stood in front of the house and remained silent, the embodiment of their non-violence vision. They simply stared at the visitor until he decided to abort his mission to bribe Lusang Arang, the community’s customary head. These women were part of the Long Isun community in Mahakam Hulu, which has resisted years of intimidation, violence, and pressure from the logging company Kemakmuran Berkah Timber (PT. KBT). In 2008, PT. KBT was granted a concession on the community’s ancestral lands without the community’s consent. This is not an isolated case, in a country where most indigenous communities hold land under customary tenure systems and lack formal titles, making them especially vulnerable to land grabbing. World Resources Institute (WRI) noted that the process for indigenous communities to secure formal land rights in Indonesia can be 15 years or more, while wealthy and politically connected companies can secure palm oil concessions within three to five years by taking advantage of legal loopholes. READ MORE

West Papua regencies to host international mangrove day events
West Papua_large
INDONESIA - Mimika and Asmat regencies in West Papua are set to host events for the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem on July 26 to educate the public on the importance of mangroves to the environment. “The major theme in this year’s celebration is ‘Mangrove for the Nation’ in which Blue Forests wants to highlight the importance of the mangrove ecosystem in all aspects of life, be it ecology, economy or social life,” said Wahyudin Opu, coordinator of Blue Forests Mangrove Co-Management, in Jayapura, West Papua, on Wednesday, Antara news agency reported. He said that in Mimika regency, the event would be held in Kokonao by monitoring the mangrove areas there and cleaning debris from the coast. “Mangrove day celebrations will also be filled with activities such as on-site education about mangroves and competitions for elementary school students in Kokonao,” he said. READ MORE

She guards Mumbai’s defence against climate change
04_Seema
INDIA - Fifty-six-year-old Seema Adgaonkar glides through swampy mangroves in ankle-deep muck. The fragrance of Avicennia marina (the grey mangrove), the most widely-spread mangrove species in Mumbai, makes the trail pleasant despite the 36 degree Celsius hot and humid conditions. Adgaonkar relishes the scent as she walks in a single file with a forest guard and two helpers, towards one of the mangrove nurseries they set up on the city’s coastline. She gives the team instructions on where to plant saplings along the course and shares tips to identify some of the species with their regional and scientific names. “You’ve to know everything that is associated with your job to do it well,” said Adgaonkar, about her erstwhile role as a Range Forest Officer (RFO), which included mangrove plantation and guarding the ecosystem that borders Mumbai. In some parts of the city’s tangled mangroves, she and her team members carry ropes and hooks to pull themselves to safety. They have also learned from crab catchers the technique of using a wooden plank to wade through the dark muck in mangroves and mudflats. Adgaonkar can navigate boats, big and small, through the creeks and estuaries of the coastal city. Until recently, she was one of the four range forest officers at the Mumbai Mangrove Conservation Unit (MMCU), a 36-member body, solely dedicated to protecting the city’s mangrove forests. With a recent promotion, Adgaonkar is on to using her skills and experience to train the next generation of guardians of Maharashtra’s forests. READ MORE

LAST WORD

Denounce Government’s Inaction to Save the Sundarbans

Dear all,

As you maybe aware that Professor Anu Muhammad, one of NCBD's central leader and a key spokesperson of the save the Sundarbans movement in Bangladesh was threatened to be kidnapped after UNESCO's Baku conference last month. It's been nearly a month since he reported the incidence to police but no action was taken to identify the criminals - let alone prosecute. 

Given government's inaction, XRISN has issued a statement of support to Anu Muhammad and to save the Sundarbans campaign. The letter was also endorsed by PSG last week on World's Mangrove Day. For your reference the statement is HERE:

Please feel free to share the statement with your network and reliable journalist network.

As the statement indicates, we will deliberate our efforts to organise together with NCBD and other Bangladeshi environmental groups to seek justice for frontline activists in Bangladesh and to take the campaign to save the Sundarbans forward in the coming months. We would like to have your advice, ideas and support to mobilise against human rights violation of mangrove rights activists on the ground. 

Please contact me or Kofi if you have any suggestions. 

Thank you for your support. 
Rumana - rowshonrumana@gmail.com
Kofi - mawusafo@yahoo.com

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ACTION ALERTS

Mangrove Action Day Photography Voting UnderwayCLICK HERE

Call for case studies from indigenous peoples and local community organisationsThis is a general invitation for sharing and contributing to the online version of the second edition of the Local Biodiversity Outlooks (LBO-2). Submissions are welcome from all indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs) with examples, stories, case studies, information and data READ MORE

Keep loggers out of Selous Game Reserve!
Tanzania’s government is moving ahead with its plans for a hydroelectric dam in Selous Game Reserve. A huge swath of the UNESCO World Heritage site and habitat of iconic African wildlife would suffer irreparable damage. 1,500 km2 – an area the size of London – has just been opened to logging. Please help us protect Selous. SIGN PETITION

Don't trash coral reefs for the cruise industry! - TAKE ACTION

Sea turtles or condominiums?
Sand mining and construction work would wipe out a marine biodiversity hotspot and destroy the livelihoods of local people, who have not been consulted. Please SIGN!


Save Penang! Reject the 3-Islands Reclamation
The lack of public consultation and detailed information about the project is shocking in view of the size of proposed reclamation which is 4,500 acres or 7 square miles
PLEASE SIGN

Save Pulau Kukup National Park - second largest mangrove island in the world. Sign The Petition

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UPCOMING EVENTS

2019 Environmental Science and Climate Change Conference September 10-11, 2019
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REGISTER NOW



Restoring natural forests
Restoring The Natural Mangrove Forest
Watch movie

Tanzania CBEMR
Community Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration in Rufiji Delta 
VIEW VIDEO

Video: Mangroves for the Future - A look bacK. As the latest phase of Mangroves for the Future (MFF) draws to a close, this video highlights some of the project’s most successful initiatives – from local women supporting national park management in Viet Nam to an island in the Maldives that has become a model for waste management, and everything in between. View Here

Making the case for Emergency Climate Change Action

Mapping Mangroves
Counting Mangroves

Poet
Placencia mangrove workshop teacher's poem

Volunteer with MAP - LEARN MORE

Watch Children's Mangrove Art Calendar Promo 2019 Click Here

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MAP 2019 Children’s Calendar  CLICK HERE

You can help ensure that the knowledge and skills needed to conserve and restore mangroves is preserved in coastal communities READ MORE

WANT TO GET INVOLVED?
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VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY

VOLUNTEER WITH MAP


MANGROVE ISSUES 

Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION

What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

What is EPIC? - The Ecosystems Protecting Infrastructure and Communities (EPIC) project:  the role of ecosystems as protective barriers against climate induced hazards

MANGROVES APP AVAILABLE
A pictorial field guide for easy identification of various mangrove species and learning about the mangroves ecosystem. CLICK HERE

View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  
WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

The Value of Mangrove Forests View Video

CBEMR Experience Exchange MAP 2017 English Subtitles
VIEW THE VIDEO

Mangroves: Guidebook to MalaysiaClick Here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE

SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".

Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
EPIC-Film 2
 
Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more


Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

The Marvellous Mangroves Education Forum is an online hub for those utilizing the Marvellous Mangroves (MM) Curriculum. It gives students, teachers and anyone interested in mangroves, the opportunity to learn and share ideas themed around the curriculum, to connect and communicate with others around the globe whilst exploring mangroves from your computer or on the go. VISIT

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The award-winning Marvellous Mangroves (MM) curriculum educates children on the importance of mangroves and their ecological functions, teaching them about modern challenges and mechanisms for sustainability. VIEW VIDEO

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

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Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW
VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More


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Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE


 Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE


"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection
Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp


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Mangrove Action Project

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