Saturday, April 10, 2021

MAP News Issue #518 - April 10, 2021

Mangrove Action Project

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The MAP News
518th Edition                                                  April 10, 2021
FEATURE

In Defense of the Quilombo Boca Do Rio
BocaRio1
BRAZIL - We are the Traditional Community of Quilombo Boca Do Rio, our territory is located in Baia de Aratu, municipality of Candeias, state of Bahia. We are duly recognized as Quilombolas by the Brazilian State, certified by Fundação Cultural Palmares. In the 1930s and 1940s, the Brazilian Navy began to covet our territory to build a military base, the Aratu Naval Base, creating conflicts with our ancestors. These confrontations culminated in a settlement between the Navy and the heirs of the slaveowner Wanderley Pinho, who registered a public deed and officially recognized our property over a fraction of the territory to facilitate the installation of petrochemical companies in our traditional territory. The violence is so intense that Braskem S/A, a company of the Odebrecht Group, is releasing chemical products onto our community to compel our people to abandon their homes. We are experiencing a real chemical war! In September of 2020, we were surprised by the start of construction work on a private port owned by the company BAHIA TERMINAIS S/A. The construction started with the devastation of the Atlantic Forest, mangroves, removing of hills, landfill of the sea, destruction of rivers and water sources. In view of the seriousness of the violations that we report here, we call on all organizations to give as much publicity as possible and, at the same time, to pressure Brazilian authorities to take appropriate measures to guarantee our rights! We ask you to contact the following authorities. READ MORE

GLOBAL

Underfunded nature-based solutions could offer big climate benefits
mangrove-restoration-area
GLOBAL - Nature-based solutions are key to advancing climate adaptation. These are approaches that work with nature, not against it — from restoring wetlands, which can protect against storms, to conserving forests that stabilize soil and runoff during floods. Mangrove forests, for example, save an estimated $80 billion per year in avoided losses from coastal flooding globally, and protect up to 18 million people. Additionally, nature-based solutions can provide many co-benefits — for nature, economies, communities, culture and health. But despite these extensive benefits, new research finds that as little as 1.5 percent of all public international climate finance has gone to support nature-based solutions for adaptation in developing countries. Just a handful of major bilateral donors and multilateral institutions have driven public funding for these approaches. The first assessment of global funding for nature-based solutions for adaptation, produced by WRI and Climate Finance Advisors — in support of the Global Commission on Adaptation’s Nature-based Solutions Action Track — finds that while there is increasing awareness and interest of natural solutions for adaptation, this has not yet translated into adequate financial support for developing countries. READ MORE

AFRICA

Mangrove Ecosystem in Mesurado Wetlands Under Enormous Threat
YCCI-Liberia
LIBERIA - Located at the back of the massive inter-ministerial complex, in Congo town, Peace Island- a beautiful piece of settlement has in the last decade seen its population surge to unbelievable levels. Once a reserved government land, it is believed to have been occupied by mostly northerners who may have come to Monrovia fleeing conflict and violence resulting from the years of war. But the beauty of the uphill island- the lining of mangrove swamp was come under threat of destruction as over population and lack of sustainable livelihood for dwellers has resulted to visible destruction of the natural environment in a next-door Monrovia settlement. Unprecedented encroachments, colossal waste dumps, and, in cases, enormous cutting of mangrove trees for fish drying can be seen with just a walk around what could be a beautify site for tourism. The EPA says it is doing all to stop the destruction of mangrove here, but its efforts could be too small to curb what a pro- environment youth movement describes as “fast destruction of nature” right before the eyes of authorities. Youth Climate Change Initiative- (YCCI-Liberia) Liberia, a climate and environment non-for-profit recently moved into Peace Island with a team of environment and climate professionals for a dialogue on the need to preserve mangrove swamps. READ MORE

AMERICAS

Unchecked development poses threats to Cayman
unchecked-development
CAYMAN ISLANDS - As a rash of roads and luxury building projects push forward in the lead up to the April 14 elections, The Cayman Islands Mangrove Rangers have begun reaching out to the construction sector, including Dart, to invite discussion on environmentally conscious development. With the Plan Cayman development scheme underway, Grand Cayman faces extensive loss of its already devastated wetlands. The same roads and building projects that buoy the pandemic-stricken economy come with long-term environmental threats when planning regulations and best practices are not enforced. Between 1976 and 2018, 72 per cent of the mangrove habitat in western Grand Cayman, spanning from Savannah to West Bay, had already been lost, according to data shared by the Department of Environment. That’s 3,845 acres of natural hurricane protection and native habitat gone, and the number grows by the day. As part of government’s development plans, more than $30 million worth of roads projects have been given the green light. Much of the two-mile expansion of the East-West Arterial had already been cleared on 6 March when rangers Dinara Perera and Kayla Young visited the site. READ MORE

50,000 bags of fertilizer:’ What could Piney Point do to Tampa Bay?
Tampa-Bay
USA - The focus for emergency teams at the old Piney Point phosphate plant property is stopping a flood from surging out of an enormous, leaking reservoir of polluted water. Success on that front could mean pumping a majority of the 480 million gallons of wastewater into Tampa Bay, posing an ecological danger to the treasured estuary that clean water advocates say may endure for weeks or months. Recent releases had dropped the pond level by approximately 100 million gallons. “That’s like dumping 50,000 bags of fertilizer into the bay all at once,” said Ed Sherwood, director of the Tampa Bay Estuary Program. The Estuary Program has tracked the nitrogen load, mostly from runoff, in that portion of the bay from Port Manatee to Pinellas Point and south for years. The releases to the port, if they continue until the pond is empty, could in a matter of days put in “double the amount of nutrients ... than what we would like to see in an entire year,” Sherwood said. READ MORE

Environmental restoration at home: Sanibel volunteers grow mangroves
mangrove-replanting
USA - Sitting in various corners and countertops in Sanibel homes, 140 young red mangroves soak up sunshine, waiting to be planted. Volunteers caring for the plants learned about the important role mangroves play in Florida during recent online workshops. From protecting shorelines against storms to creating a nursery for a plethora of sea life, mangrove habitat is a vital resource. The “walking trees” as they’re sometimes called, are part of Coastal Watch’s Back to our Roots initiative under the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation’s educational arm — Sanibel Sea School. Kealy McNeal, the conservation initiative coordinator at the Sanibel Sea School, said the program was a way to get the community involved. “Really, the biggest part of this is the education component of the initiative,” McNeal said. “Not only are we having the volunteers grow mangroves but we’re also having them understand why they are growing them: how animals rely on them, how they reduce erosion, manage water quality and create a buffer against storm damage.” READ MORE

ASIA

With stories and puppets, environmentalist battles to save Indonesia’s mangroves
INDONESIA-ENVIRONMENT
INDONESIA - Caked in mud up to their knees, a small group of Indonesian youngsters plant mangrove saplings along a stretch of exposed coastline next to the Java Sea under the watchful eye of local environmentalist Samsudin. A former school teacher, Samsudin has now dedicated his life to conservation and uses puppetry and storytelling to spread his message to the young about the importance of protecting mangroves in an area suffering massive coastal erosion. "To keep tides from hitting us, we plant mangroves, forests for animals and oxygen for us to live. I weave everything into my stories," said Samsudin, 50, as he mused how some people in the area saw mangroves as a "nuisance" and would pull them out. Indonesia is home to over a fifth of the world's mangrove forests, which naturally help keep out high tidal waters. But for years, coastal communities have chopped down trees to clear the way for fish and shrimp farms, and for rice paddies. READ MORE

World’s Largest Mangrove Forest Reels from Aggressive Development
Padma-bridge
BANGLADESH - The world’s largest mangrove forest — the Sundarbans, which occur in Bangladesh and neighbouring India — is being imperiled by major development projects in addition to the rapidly changing climate and sea level rise. With its impending completion, Padma Bridge, one of the most challenging construction projects in Bangladesh’s history, will open up prospects for the local economy. Costing around US $6.2 billion, the 6.2 km-long bridge is expected to boost Bangladesh’s GDP by as much as 1.2 percent. But there is a downside — a big one. The Padma Bridge may destroy the Sundarbans, if unplanned development in southwestern Bangladesh follows the opening of the bridge, as has often occurred elsewhere with such projects. There is no other place like the Sundarbans on Earth. Bangladesh is already considered a leader in climate-change adaptation and could also be in the vanguard for climate and biodiversity goals, making major commitments under the Paris climate accords and the Convention on Biological Diversity. But the future of Bangladesh’s critical ecosystems and wildlife is far from certain. The pending completion of the long-awaited Padma Bridge is providing both an opportunity and a challenge for the Bangladesh government to demonstrate its commitment to green development and environmental leadership. As its mega-bridge proceeds, the world is keenly watching Bangladesh. READ MORE

Japan’s Sumitomo Corp is still pushing dirty coal
dirty-coal
BANGLADESH - In the wake of the fiercest storm Bangladesh has experienced this century, Japanese financial institutions and coal developers are trying to push three new coal power stations, fuelling extreme weather and climate change. Locals on remote Matarbari Island on the southeastern coast of Bangladesh are still dealing with the devastation of super cyclone Amphan, which has displaced over two million people. But these communities are also contending with a massive build-out of coal power which threatens their lives and livelihoods, and will worsen the extreme weather conditions caused by climate change. Sumitomo Corporation (Sumitomo), the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation (SMBC) and Nippon Export and Investment Insurance (NEXI) are pursuing proposed new coal power stations totalling 3,100 MW of capacity. These projects have: displaced local communities, destroyed livelihoods, and violated workers’ rights, would worsen air pollution, killing thousands of people over the lifetime of the projects, would increase climate impacts on the already vulnerable Bangladesh, releasing millions of tonnes of CO2 throughout the plants’ operational lifetimes, and violate the climate policies of JICA, SMBC and Sumitomo. Given these health, human rights and climate impacts, Sumitomo, JICA, NEXI and SMBC need to get out of the coal projects on Matarbari Island immediately. TAKE ACTION!

Java’s mangroves pay a high price for stopping plastic flowing out to sea
mangrove-diaper
INDONESIA - Celine van Bijsterveldt and her team had traveled to Central Java’s mangrove forests to investigate efforts to restore them. But when the researchers saw plastic trash strewn throughout the swamps, ensnaring roots and shrouding branches, they were instead compelled to examine its toll on the trees. “It’s a crazy amount of plastic,” said van Bijsterveldt, a doctoral candidate at Utrecht University and NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, and the lead author of the resulting paper in Science of The Total Environment. “You just couldn’t ignore it.” Although mangroves adapt to plastic debris, too much can kill them. Scientists worry that its continued accumulation could endanger these forests and the ecological and human communities depending on them. This concern is especially pressing in Indonesia, home to almost one-quarter of the world’s mangrove ecosystems and to highly acute plastic litter and mangrove destruction. READ MORE
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URGENT ACTION

Stop construction work on a private port In Defense of the Quilombo Boca Do Rio TAKE ACTION!

Tell Sumitomo to stop building polluting coal power in Bangladesh! TAKE ACTION!


Stop Adaro, Indonesia’s coal giant, from refinance its debt.
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ACTION ALERTS

Lawsuit Against Genetically Engineered Tree Solidarity Group – SIGN PETITION

Tell the Japan International Cooperation Agency not to fund polluting coal – TAKE ACTION

Please SIGN: keep plantations out of orangutan habitat!
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Unilever: stop destroying mangroves for convenience food! SIGN OUR PETITION 
Stop plundering the oceans for industrial aquaculture! SIGN THE PETITION

Take action now and stop the build-out of coal plants in Bangladesh.



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Please see our newest video: "Restoring The Natural Mangrove Forest"
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Restoring The Natural Mangrove Forest
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Community Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration in Rufiji Delta 
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Video: Mangroves for the Future - A look bacK. As the latest phase of Mangroves for the Future (MFF) draws to a close, this video highlights some of the project’s most successful initiatives – from local women supporting national park management in Viet Nam to an island in the Maldives that has become a model for waste management, and everything in between. View Here

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Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

The Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum begins with a simple philosophy – getting future generations to not only learn about, but understand the importance of mangrove forests. VISIT

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Thursday, April 8, 2021

IN DEFENSE OF THE QUILOMBO BOCA DO RIO - Call to Action

 INTERNATIONAL CAMPAIGN 


We are the TRADITIONAL COMMUNITY OF QUILOMBO BOCA DO RIO, our territory is located in Baia  de Aratu, municipality of Candeias, state of Bahia. We are duly recognized as quilombolas by the Brazilian State,  certified by Fundação Cultural Palmares and with a regularization process in progress at the National Institute of  Colonization and Agrarian Reform (INCRA). Our community has ancestral origins in blacks fleeing sugar mills,  indigenous remnants and blacks who remained in the area after the abolition of slavery. We have a specific territorial  relationship, a common historical trajectory and we recognize our identity in the long process of resistance to the  oppression suffered by our ancestors that lasts until the present times. 

Our people have always survived from fishing in the mangroves and beaches of Aratu Bay, where we collect fish,  crustaceans and shellfish, and in the Atlantic Rainforest, where we collect fruits and essential items for our survival  such as firewood, material for handicrafts, guaiamuns, medicinal herbs, among others. We practice small-scale  farming and raise small animals. Our people have ancestral traditions and knowledge passed down from generation  to generation. 

In the 30s and 40s of the last century, the Brazilian Navy began to covet our territory to build a military base, the  Aratu Naval Base, creating conflicts with our ancestors. These confrontations culminated in a settlement between  the Navy and the heirs of the slaveowner Wanderley Pinho, who registered a public deed and officially recognized  our property over a fraction of the territory to facilitate the installation of petrochemical companies in our traditional  territory. Countless companies have settled in our territory, such as the Port of Aratu, Volpak, Braskem, GDK,  Mendes Jr, Ford and Dow Chemicals

Even so, we continue to use traditional territory in the most diverse ways, whether at sea, mangroves, beaches,  sandbanks and forests. It turns out that the community has come to be affected by serious conflicts and violations, restricting our access, closing traditional paths, devastating our forests and mangroves, increasing the sendimentation  of the sea, rivers, water sources and contaminating the environment and our bodies. 

The violence is so intense that Braskem S/A, a company of the Odebrecht Group, is releasing chemical products  onto our community to compel our people to abandon their homes. We are experiencing a real chemical war! Two  ordinances were created with private security that cause constraints on access to our homes. We do not have access  to public education and health policies in the community. There is no public transport and it is necessary to walk  more than 6 km to access it. At all times, we are threatened with power outages, drinking water and dumping. 


In addition to this daily scenario of denial of our rights,
CODEBA (a Brazilian public company) is trying to expel us  from our ancestral territory through a lawsuit that is pending in the 4th Federal Civil Court of Bahia. Mind you, those  who invaded our territory accuse us of invaders! Urged on by the community, neither the Federal Prosecutor's Office  nor INCRA, authorities with an institutional role to promote the defense of the community, take any legal action in  our defense. The Federal Public Ministry has even refused to meet to hear from the community and other civil society  organizations about the serious violations that have occurred. Thus, while urgent measures are not being taken by the  authorities, the community is at serious risk of expulsion, even with title deed to part of the duly registered territory

Intensifying our suffering even more, in September of 2020, we were surprised by the start of construction work on  a private port owned by the company BAHIA TERMINAIS S/A. The construction started with the devastation of  the Atlantic Forest, mangroves, removing of hills, landfill of the sea, destruction of rivers and water sources. It will suppress most of our territory, depriving us of the means to guarantee our existence and subsistence, as well as that  of other quilombola communities and artisanal fishermen who fish and shellfish in the area. Even though there was  a contrary recommendation from the State Public Ombudsman Office, the Government of the Bahia State disregarded  and granted an environmental license for the enterprise in an irregular manner, full of illegalities, without observing  the requirements of the environmental legislation, as well as the rights of the traditional and remaining peoples of  quilombo. The necessary environmental and social studies were not carried out, nor was the publicity required by the  law given to the undertaking. 

The land where the project will be installed was provided by the Government of the Bahia State, without considering  the ancestral rights of our community, showing a role as a promoter of private interests, when it should act as a  mediator in order to protect the rights of those historically disadvantaged. At no time was the community heard or  acknowledged. At no time were the rights of traditional and remaining quilombo communities provided for in the  Federal Constitution, the laws and international treaties signed by Brazil, such as ILO Convention 169, respected.

In view of this flagrant illegality, we activated the justice system and on 03/10/2021 a preliminary decision was  issued determining the suspension of environmental licenses and the immediate halt to the devastation carried out by  the company BAHIA TERMINAIS S/A. However, to date, the Government of Bahia has not taken a position about  the court decision neither has not supported, through its agency INEMA, the compliance with the judicial orders. The  same occurs with the Federal government, which can intervene through the government agencies ANTAQ and  IBAMA, and remains equally silent. Thus, BAHIA TERMINAIS S/A continues to destroy the territory extremely  quickly. It is cutting down forests, earthmoving hills, landing mangroves and the sea, desecrating animals from forests  and mangroves and the memory of our ancestors. 

When trying to notify the company of the judicial decision, the marshall officer verified that there is no trace of  BAHIA TERMINAIS S/A at the registered address. Everything leads us to believe that this is a ghost company!!! At  the same time, there are strong indications that the company BAHIA TERMINAIS S/A, in fact, is owned by a  powerful contractor known as CARLOS SEABRA SUAREZ, with a strong influence on the political establishment,  the judiciary and the media. For this reason, the case is shielded in the Bahia media and there is no coverage in the  mass media. 

In view of the seriousness of the violations that we report here, we call on all organizations to give as much  publicity as possible and, at the same time, to pressure Brazilian authorities to take appropriate measures to  guarantee our rights!

We ask you to contact the following authorities. 

Candeias, Bahia, Brazil, March 18th, 2021 

InterAmerican Commission of Human Rights 

Rapporteur on the Rights of Afro-Descendants and Against Racial Discrimination 

Commisioner Margarette May Macaulay 

cidhafrodescendiente@oas.org 

6ª Chamber of the Public Ombudsman Offices – Indigenous People and Traditiona Communities 6ccr@mpf.mp.br 

Human Rights Commission – House of Representatives/National Congress, Brasil 

Dep. José Carlos Veras dos Santos – Commission President 

cdh@camara.leg.br 

Human Rights Commission – State Congress of Bahia, Brazil 

Dep. Jacó Lula da Silva – Commission President 

sgc@alba.ba.gov.br 

State of Bahia 

Governor Ruy Costa 

layla.almeida@casacivil.ba.gov.br 

Secretary of Justice and Human Rights of Bahia 

Secretary Carlos Martins 

ascom@sjdhds.ba.gov.br 

Secretary of Environment of the State of Bahia 

Secretary João Carlos Oliveira da Silva 

ascom.sema@sema.ba.gov.br 

Dra. Ludmila Faria – Procuradora da FCP Fundação Cultural Palmares 

ludmila.faria@agu.gov.br 

Presidência da FCP Fundação Cultural Palmares 

Dr. Sérgio Camargo 

quilombo@palmares.gov.br. 

Secretaria Nacional de Políticas de Promoção da Igualdade Racial - SNPIR 

Secretário Paulo Roberto 

gab.snpir@mdh.gov.br

Secretaria de Promoção da Igualdade Racial 

Secretária Fabya Reis 

fabya.reis@sepromi.ba.gov.br 

Relatora Especial sobre Racismo – DH/ONU 

Oficial de programa Carmen Alevaro Flores 

carevaloflores@ohchr.org 

Contacts with the community can be made through the e-mail: qbocadorioaratu@gmail.com


Saturday, March 27, 2021

MAP News Issue #517 - March 27, 2021

Mangrove Action Project
The MAP News
517th Edition                                                  Mar 27, 2021
FEATURE

Mangrove Rangers decry “piratical attitude” of construction industry
Red-Bay
CAYMAN ISLANDS - An illegal mangrove clearing in Red Bay, the home district of Premier Alden McLaughlin, was brought to the attention of the Mangrove Rangers Wednesday afternoon. Clearing work was ongoing when a ranger visited the site Wednesday, despite two cease-and-desist orders that had already been issued by the Department of Environment. One order has been issued to the construction company and another to the land owner. A DoE officer confirmed the works at the end of Selkirk Drive and Abbey Way had not been granted planning permission. The illegal clearing is another example of a brazen violation of the Species Conservation Plan for Mangroves, which took effect in April 2020. That plan establishes, “mangroves may not be taken, meaning they may not be killed, collected, destroyed, damaged, or harmed,” unless planning permission has been granted. When asked about the site, Premier McLaughlin said the land is private and government cannot deny the right to develop private land. “I think people forget that the whole of Red Bay and most of Prospect was like that when I was a boy 50 years ago. A lot of mangroves were cleared to make way for the land our houses currently sit on,” McLaughlin wrote. READ MORE

GLOBAL

These 10 Golden Rules for Planting Trees Could Help Save the Planet
PLANTING-RULES
GLOBAL - There are around 60,000 tree species in the world, spread out across myriad ecosystems. Within these ecosystems, and around these trees, are countless other organisms ranging from the tiniest bacterium to the mightiest moose. Between the trees, their landscapes and their peer flora and fauna, exist startlingly complex relationships that we're only just beginning to understand. The matter gets even more complex when you factor humans into the equation – around 2 billion people rely on forests alone, for work, food, shelter and water. Of course, trees play a massive role in sequestering carbon from our atmosphere. It's perhaps no surprise then, that there are a healthy number of tree planting initiatives around the globe – run by businesses, governments and even individuals. Make no mistake: we need to be planting trees. But while many of these initiatives are certainly ambitious, it's important that we establish a set of best practices to get the most from the resources we put into restoring forests. READ MORE

AMERICAS

Evaluating the engineering benefits of Florida’s mangrove forests
Florida-mangrove
USA - Along the Florida coastline, forests of trees with a dense tangle of prop roots appear to be standing on stilts above the water. These trees, or mangroves, are not only magnificent to see, but are a key element in protecting coastlines and communities during coastal storms. Researchers at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) have partnered with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Jacksonville District and the U.S. Naval Academy to explore the engineering value of Florida’s mangrove forests. For more than a decade, the USACE Engineering With Nature (EWN) Program has pursued the intentional alignment of natural and engineering processes to efficiently and sustainably deliver economic, environmental and social benefits. One of these opportunities is the application of natural and nature-based features, which are landscapes, such as mangrove trees, that are used to provide engineering functions relevant to flood risk management. READ MORE

Coastal Watch celebrates successful initiative launch
CW-BACK-TO-ROOTS
USA - Coastal Watch reported that it is celebrating a successful launch of its new initiative as more than 140 mangrove propagules are now being cared for in the residences of Back to Our Roots participants. Back to Our Roots is a community-led initiative to learn about, grow and restore mangroves on Sanibel and Captiva. Participants received a mangrove propagule that they are caring for until it is ready to be planted at a local restoration site later this year. From January through March, Coastal Watch held five workshops to share the importance of mangroves to the barrier island ecosystem. Conservation Initiative Coordinator Kealy McNeal led each session virtually via Zoom. “One of the benefits to having the virtual workshops was that we were able to reach out to several people who wouldn’t otherwise have been able attend in person,” she said. “Most of the workshop participants watched from their homes on Sanibel, however we did have some participants that watched from other states. During the five workshops, we received shout-outs from New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and California.” READ MORE

ASIA

Female rangers guard world’s largest arid mangrove forest in Pakistan
mangrove-rangers
PAKISTAN - For decades, grazing animals and loggers destroyed thousands of trees on Pakistan’s Indus River Delta, home to the largest arid mangrove forests in the world. The Indus Delta has around 95 percent of the total mangrove forest cover in Pakistan, and was once home to eight species of mangroves, which the Sindh Forest Department (SFD) says forest destruction reduced by half. By 2005, mangrove cover had declined to 84,000 hectares — the lowest recorded level — from 260,000 hectares in the 1980s. In 2019, as part of an ongoing campaign to improve forest cover, the SFD collaborated with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to set up a mangrove nursery, hiring 250 women not just to plant new trees but also to guard them against threats from animals and humans. READ MORE

Capitol plants more mangrove propagules in Banate
mangrove-planting
PHILIPPINES - In celebration of World Water Day on March 22, the provincial capitol recently planted about 500 mangrove propagules of the bungalon species along the shoreline of Barangay Alacaygan in Banate town. “We must continue with our regular programs and activities like environmental protection amid the coronavirus pandemic,” said Gov. Arthur Defensor Jr. The mangrove planting areas in Banate will be expanded next year, he added. The governor spearheaded the activity together with Mayor Carlos Cabangal and Vice Mayor Jojie Undar. According to Cesar Emmanuel Buyco Jr., officer-in-charge of the Provincial Environment and Natural Resources Office (PENRO), only a few individuals joined in the activity in compliance with the physical distancing protocol to curb the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). READ MORE

Area of Hainan's mangrove forests to increase by 1,700 hectares
Wenchang-Bamen-Bay-Mangrove-Tree-Forest-Hainan-Island7
CHINA - Evergreen deciduous forests in the coastal zone of the southern Chinese island of Hainan will increase by 1,700 hectares in the next five years, which will contribute to an increase in the level of local ecology, reported the Hainan Daily citing the regional forestry department. According to the department's estimates, over the same period of time, the authorities intend to restore over 3,200 hectares of mangroves, degraded due to a number of unfavorable factors. The year 2021 on Hainan is expected to mark the beginning of an important milestone in forest management activities through the introduction of new technologies — dynamic databases and modern verification systems. READ MORE

Crocodiles make a comeback in India's Bhitarkanika mangrove reserve
crocodile
INDIA - Bhitarkanika in India's eastern Odisha state is one of the sub-continent's largest mangrove ecosystems, and is home to salt water crocodiles and a huge range of other creatures. It is also the world's largest mass nesting site for Olive-Ridley turtles. The Bhitarkanika sanctuary is located in the north-eastern region of Kendrapara district of Odisha and the sanctuary covers an area of 672 square kilometers of mangrove forests and wetland. Three rivers flow out to sea at Bhitarkanika, forming a tidal maze of muddy creeks and mangroves.The park is home to more than 215 species of birds. The population of the saltwater or estuarine crocodile has increased in the water bodies of Odisha’s Bhitarkanika National Park and its nearby areas in Kendrapara district, with forest officials counting 1,757 crocodiles in last year’s annual reptile census. READ MORE

Adaro, Indonesia’s coal giant, is seeking to refinance its debt.
Adaro-coal-mine
INDONESIA - Adaro Energy (Adaro) is one of Indonesia’s coal giants with coal business in its DNA. Adaro operates the largest single-site coal mine in South Kalimantan under a Coal Cooperation Agreement with the Government of Indonesia. It controls around 31,379 hectares of land, the equivalent of 58,640 football fields. Adaro has US$2 billion worth of debt due in 2021. For its operational and capital expenditure, Adaro is supported by financial institutions that funded Adaro through lending or helped Adaro issue its bonds. Despite the scientific warnings about the catastrophic impacts of coal to climate change, Adaro has no plans to demonstrate how it will phase out coal and diversify its business in a manner consistent with the Paris climate agreement efforts. In 2020, Adaro produced 54.53 Mt, and in 2021 it continues to focus on its coal business by setting a coal production target of 52 – 54 Mt. Use the form to email Adaro’s current lenders*, asking them to stop funding Adaro. READ MORE

OCEANA

Mangroves from space: 30 years of satellite images are helping us understand how climate change threatens these valuable forests
mangrove-from-space
Australia - Australia is home to around 2% of the world’s mangrove forests and is the fifth most mangrove-forested country on Earth. Mangroves play a crucial role in the ecosystem thanks to the dizzying array of plants, animals and birds they feed, house and protect. Our research used satellite images to study the life cycles of mangrove forests in the Northern Territory, Queensland, and New South Wales. We compared the satellite images with field data collected in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, and found a surprising degree of variation in mangrove life cycles. We’re using the phrase life cycle, but the scientific term is “phenology”. Phenology is the study of periodic events in the life cycles of plants and animals. For example, some plants flower and fruit during the spring and summer, and some lose their leaves in autumn and winter. Satellites are an excellent tool to study changes in forest health, area, and phenology. Some satellites have been taking images of Earth for decades, giving us the chance to look back at the state of mangrove forests from 30 years ago or more. READ MORE

Australia's lesser-known ecosystems are heading for collapse. Here's what we stand to lose
ecosystem-collapse
AUSTRALIA - A damning report has found several Australian ecosystems are so degraded, they are heading toward collapse if we do not intervene. Of the 20 systems studied by a group of scientists, 19 showed evidence of collapse in some areas and required "urgent action" to prevent them from undergoing total collapse. Ecosystem collapse is what happens when a system is so fundamentally altered that it completely reorders, often resulting in a less diverse group of plants and animals and interactions between them than before. Among those identified in the report in Global Change Biology were some very well-known ecosystems — the Great Barrier Reef, the Murray-Darling Basin, Ningaloo Reef and Far North Queensland's tropical rainforests. But then there were the less well-known habitats like the Georgina gidgee woodlands, the western central arid zones, and the Gulf of Carpentaria mangrove forests. READ MORE
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Please see our newest video: "Restoring The Natural Mangrove Forest"
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Restoring The Natural Mangrove Forest
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Community Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration in Rufiji Delta 
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Video: Mangroves for the Future - A look bacK. As the latest phase of Mangroves for the Future (MFF) draws to a close, this video highlights some of the project’s most successful initiatives – from local women supporting national park management in Viet Nam to an island in the Maldives that has become a model for waste management, and everything in between. View Here

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Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

The Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum begins with a simple philosophy – getting future generations to not only learn about, but understand the importance of mangrove forests. VISIT

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The award-winning Marvellous Mangroves (MM) curriculum educates children on the importance of mangroves and their ecological functions, teaching them about modern challenges and mechanisms for sustainability. VIEW VIDEO

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