Tuesday, January 9, 2018

MAP’s mangrove conservation and restoration project at Thung Yor, Thailand

By: Udomsak Pariwatpan, MAP Field Officer, (9 Jan. 2018)





      Thung Yor is a small village located in Krabi Province, southern of Thailand. Some of the village area is mangrove forest which is connected to the Andaman Sea by tidal streams. Most of the villager’s main occupation is in agriculture with a supplementary livelihood from coastal small-scale fisheries.  So, due to their dependence on the fishing the villagers have placed a priority on the conservation and restoration of mangroves.



     Photos showing abandoned shrimp ponds before hydrological restoration.  Pond #3 above is holding mostly rainwater.

     The community joined MAP to undertake a CBEMR project with the objective to restore 2 hectares of abandoned shrimp ponds back to mangroves.  The site consists of 3 ponds as seen in the Google Earth image above with little or no tidal exchange, especially pond #2 and #3 which was were waterlogged with few mangrove seeds entering the ponds and the condition was not suitable for mangrove growth.  Pond #1 remained very wet as the pond drained through the sluice gate and by the time the pond was drained the tidal starting to come back up due the semidurnal tides. ( 2 high & 2 low tides in 24 hr) 

Under CBEMR the priority is to restore normal tidal flushing.  The community wanted to rehabilitate the mangroves but the traditional planting method would not work in this situation due to the disturbed hydrology. MAP introduced the concept of Community-based Ecological Mangrove Restoration (CBEMR) which was a completely new approach for the community but they trusted MAP and are determined to learn.


On 8-9 March 2017 mangrove study tour to learn about CBEMR at Lang Da, Nai Nang and Thale Nok villages.



On 19-20 August 2017 a backhoe was used to reconnect the 3 abandoned shrimp ponds together and then to a tidal stream 
      according to restoration plan developed.

    Some members of Thung Yor took part in a CBEMR training workshop and field study tour (8-9 March 2017) to visit other CBEMR sites to learn the theory of this new restoration process. A restoration plan was developed for the site, following a full field survey including measuring the surface strata height of the pond bottoms using an auto-level.  The hydrology improvement started by using a backhoe to make a drainage channel in pond #1 and breaching the earthen dyke for better drainage at the old sluice gate location (lowest point).  The objective is to have rapid drain down of the pond similar to the nearby mangrove. The channel dug within the pond followed the water drainage pattern looking much like a natural winding stream rather a straight canal.  

The result was good tidal exchange which allowed mangrove seeds to enter into the site with each tide. Mother nature facilitates mangrove seeds to be dispersed everywhere in the ponds and the species start growing in the zone which is best suited for them.  Seeds that end up in an in appropriate location do not fair well, die, or are out-competed by more favourable species for that location.  This is a process of natural selection and results in a natural mangrove ecosystem rather than an even aged man-made plantation.


     Volunteer seedlings appear on site 2 months after hydrological restoration. No planting needed.

     Following just two months of normal hydrology exchange we undertook our first monitoring using time-lapse photos and the results were fantastic with many volunteer seedlings growing on the restoration site. Moreover, there are many different species of seedlings such as Rhizophora apiculata, Xylocarpus sp., Avicennia sp., Acanthus sp., Ceriops sp., Bruguiera sp. etc.

   The chief of village, Mr. Raksa Kohmodkan stated: “We would like to restore the mangrove forest back to its original condition and allow people in this community to use it as a source of livelihood. This site can also be a showcase model for other communities to follow.”

   The future of mangrove depends on you so please help nature to regenerate the mangrove.

Note: The Thung Yor CBEMR project supported by Synchronicity Earth and MAP is part of
           SE’s Regeneration Portfolio.
 
http://syncmain.wpengine.com/?post_type=partner&p=14495




Thursday, January 4, 2018

MAP News Issue 433 - Jan 6, 2018

Mangrove Action Project

The MAP News
433rd Edition                                                     Jan 6, 2018

FEATURE STORY
 
Have you gotten your 2018 International Children’s Art Calendar yet?
MAPChildrens2018
Our 17th edition, the 2018 calendar is our most beautiful to date, and celebrates MAP's 25th Anniversary! This colorful calendar has increased in popularity since its first publication in 2002. Children from 14 nations entered our contest by answering a simple, but intriguing question: “What do the mangroves mean to my community and myself?” The contest is paired with field trips and lessons, encouraging students to explore the mangroves. You can make an investment in the future of these children – every penny counts. Your contribution will help students become stewards of their precious coastal resources, and to pass their knowledge on to others. The calendar gives voice to the children who will become environmentalists, leaders, and mangrove conservationists. You can also purchase the calendar directly from our online store for $15*, or by sending a check to MAP at 606 Maynard Ave S Ste 102, Seattle, WA 98104.Will you help these children share how important mangroves are? ORDER NOW
FREE WITH DONATION OF $35 OR MORE

AFRICA

Tanzania hastens plans for power plant in Selous game reserve
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TANZANIA - In June 2017, Tanzanian president John Pombe Magufuli rekindled plans to construct a huge hydropower plant in the Selous Game Reserve that he said will boost the country’s energy outlook. Conservationists are opposed to this project saying it threatens the endangered animal species in the area especially the black rhinoceros and elephants. “Over 200,000 people face a threat to their livelihoods downstream of the dam, in areas with high poverty where people rely on fish for their protein. Tanzania has to make wise and, informed choices about its development trajectory to ensure that these people will not suffer,” says Dr Amani Ngusaru, WWF Tanzania Country Director. According to WWF downstream changes to the Rufiji river flow and loss of sediment it carries could see the Rufiji Delta along with East Africa’s largest mangrove forest shrink, and the offshore fishery, reputedly Tanzania’s richest fishery, contract reveals the report. The 50,000 km2 Selous Game Reserve (SGR) is one of the most important protected areas in Africa, and has been recognized as a World Heritage Site since 1982. READ MORE

Why Sierra Leone is running out of fish
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SIERRA LEON - Foreign trawlers are plundering unguarded West African waters. One evening in Tombo, as fish buyers throng the seafront, an argument erupts at the far end of the harbour. Angry voices waft through the air, as Pa Seaport, the master fisherman of Sierra Leone, tries to solve a heated dispute between local fishermen and a South Korean man. They accuse him of damaging their nets with his trawler, which, they say, was heading to an area where fishing is banned. This squabble points to a much bigger problem. In Sierra Leone nearly half the population does not have enough to eat, and fish make up most of what little protein people get. But the country’s once-plentiful shoals, combined with its weak government, have lured a flotilla of unscrupulous foreign trawlers to its waters. Most of the trawlers fly Chinese flags, though dozens also sail from South Korea, Italy, Guinea and Russia. Their combined catch is pushing Sierra Leone’s fisheries to the brink of collapse. READ MORE

ASIA

Villages like Nai Nang and Ta Sanook need your partnership
Mangrove Honey Bees
Four years ago the community of Nai Nang in Thailand started producing honey made from the mangroves flowers surrounding the village. Nai Nang villagers had already been involved in apiculture for some time but MAP helped provide material, technical training, develop labels, marketing and equipment support to take this project to the next level. The hives were incredibly successful, and the community sells around 300 kilos of honey each year! The story doesn’t end there! A nearby village, Ta-Sanook, showed keen interest in beekeeping as an alternative livelihood. When members of each community met, it became evident that something exciting could begin here. Soon, villagers from Ta-Sanook undertook a day-long training under the supervision of the experienced leaders from Nai-Nang village. They demonstrated beekeeping techniques, shared beehive construction methods and gave important recommendations for producing honey. At a second training, the women of Nai Nang taught their sisters at Ta Sanook the craft of making value added products such as shampoo, conditioner and hand soap. Your $50 gift will get them the tools they need to successfully restore their mangroves.

Chainsaws imperil an old-growth mangrove stronghold
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MYANMAR - When viewed from the bow of a boat, the shoreline near the city of Myeik in southern Myanmar is all green. In every direction, low-slung mangroves blanket the horizon, their trunks submerged under several feet of water at high tide. The trees anchor a sprawling landscape that supports village life and a booming fishing industry up and down the shoreline of Tanintharyi, Myanmar’s southernmost state. But in many places, what appears green and lush from a distance disguises a landscape in peril. Christoph Zockler, an ornithologist with the German foundation Manfred-Hermsen-Stiftung for Nature Conservation and Environmental Protection, has seen this up close. He first traveled through this labyrinth of coastal islands and mudflats in 2013 in search of shorebirds. In November of 2016, in collaboration with the U.K.-based NGO Fauna and Flora International (FFI), Zockler and a team of researchers from Myeik launched a 12-day expedition of coastal Tanintharyi by boat, sleeping on board and, when the tides allowed, camping on shore. The team cataloged otters, dolphins, vast swarms of crabs at low tide, a wide variety of fish and more than 200 species of birds, including the critically endangered spoon-billed sandpiper (Calidris pygmaea), of which no more than 600 likely remain on Earth. But among the marine wildlife and endangered bird sightings, the team also observed human activity that is putting the future of the mangroves in jeopardy. READ MORE

Industrial pollution ravaging Sg Chalok's once vibrant ecosystem
Prawn Farm Pollution
SINGAPORE - Sungai Chalok in Penarik used to be a national hotspot for shrimp (udang galah) anglers, as it allowed them to snag as many as five kilogrammes of the crustaceans within less than half a day. But four years ago, the shrimp started to disappear and today, anglers would be lucky to capture three shrimps after a day’s-worth of fishing. Even the popular baung catfish and ‘udang gantung’ (small shrimp) are now missing from fish traps. The problem began when one of the country’s largest shrimp farms, run by Blue Archipelago Sdn Bhd, started discharging sea water contaminated with chemicals into Sungai Chalok, which affected the ecosystem, especially the shrimps which are sensitive to pollution. Stopa Sulong, 66, said shrimps are a barometer of the health of a river system. READ MORE

AMERICAS

At age 16, A Maryland student is working with NASA on mangrove problem
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USA - In spring 2016, Liza Goldberg asked scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., if she could do research there. But there was a problem: She was 14, and the agency's internship program accepts students starting at 16. As luck would have it, two NASA satellite experts — David Lagomasino and Temilola Fatoyinbo — saw the request. Lagomasino and Fatoyinbo thought Goldberg could help them use satellite data to map mangroves — muddy, tangled-trunk forests that fringe the coastlines of dozens of tropical countries and as far north as St. Augustine, Fla. Mangroves are critical ecosystems: They store huge amounts of carbon and nurture fish and shrimp species that millions of people depend on for food. But much about them remains mysterious. Less than two years later, Goldberg has developed what might be the world's first satellite-based early warning system to determine where mangroves are threatened. The work incorporates data from four satellites on mangrove growth and loss, rainfall, agriculture, and urban growth. Green, yellow and red pixels on a Google Earth base map indicate threat levels ranging from low to high. READ MORE

The turtle liberation in El Salvador
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EL SALVADOR - The Mangrove Association and its allies in El Salvador are showing that conservation works best if it has grassroots organizing behind it. These infant turtles are lucky to be alive. They're olive ridleys, and, like the six other sea turtle species still alive on Earth, they face harrowing threats to their survival. From the destruction of their coastal habitat, climate change, and entanglement in marine debris, their numbers have declined by at least 30 percent in recent decades, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature declares them vulnerable to extinction on its Red List of Threatened Species. They face extra peril in El Salvador, where the consumption of turtle eggs is a long-time culinary tradition and people comb the beach collecting eggs to sell at market. In this part of the country, though, baby turtles have bodyguards. Isla Montecristo is just one of hundreds of small Salvadoran communities that rely on the mangrove forest and its riches for their survival. Without the trees and their enormous root systems, the ocean would wash the town and its turtle hatchery away READ MORE

EUROPE

New coral sowing method could inspire large-scale reef restoration
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GERMANY - Researchers with the nonprofit SECORE International have developed a new technique for planting coral. The method could enable reef restoration efforts at larger scales. Currently, the process of replanting reefs is labor-intensive. Divers plant coral larvae or coral fragments individually. Often, such restoration efforts occur across a region no larger than 10,000 square feet. Meanwhile, coral degradation is occurring across thousands of square miles. The new technique involves the stabilization of coral larvae in a specially-designed substrate. Instead of being individually planted by hand, the larvae-lined substrate attaches naturally to the reef. The substrate looks like a small, star-like anchor. It is wedged into crevices in the reef, allowing the corals to naturally sows themselves into the reef structure. Using previous methods, the planting of 10,000 individual corals inside a 10,000 square-foot plot requires anywhere from several hundred to a few thousand person-hours of labor. "Sowing the same number of corals could be achieved in less than 50 person-hours, a time saving of over 90 percent," Margaret Miller, research director for SECORE, said in a news release. READ MORE

OCEANA

Ready the cocktail sauce: mega prawn farm gets go ahead for shrimp nursery
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AUSTRALIA - Australia’s biggest producer of farmed prawns is set to become even bigger. Seafarms (ASX:SFG) this week got the tick of approval for its Sea Dragon shrimp project in the Northern Territory. Known for its operation of premium Crystal Bay prawns, the shrimp producer is developing a large-scale land-based project which aims to produce reliable volumes all year round, with potential to net the company in excess of $3 billion in export revenue. On Monday Seafarms was granted an aquaculture licence for its breeding and maturation centre near Darwin, where top quality prawns will roost before they move to the grow-out facility in East Kimberly. At full production Project Sea Dragon (PSD) will produce up to 150,000 tonnes a year of black tiger shrimp, in 10,000 hectares of production ponds. READ MORE
 
 
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LAST WORD


Dear colleagues,

The World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity has good momentum and is reaching millions of people. We are getting several thousand visitors a day on our Scientists’ Warning project website http://scientistswarning.forestry.oregonstate.edu/


In addition to English, the Warning is now available in 14 additional languages. These include Dutch, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Portuguese, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Telugu, and Turkish. These translations are available at http://scientistswarning.forestry.oregonstate.edu/


Any scientist that did not sign the article before the BioScience publication deadline, is invited to endorse it by visiting (scientists.forestry.oregonstate.edu). Please invite any of your scientist contacts to endorse the article.

Your tweets have been very effective in keeping the momentum going, please continue this in the New Year with tweets such as:

The #ScientistsWarningtoHumanity https://doi.org/10.1093/biosci/bix125 is now available in 14 new languages from several continents. View here: http://scientistswarning.forestry.oregonstate.edu/
or
I signed the #ScientistsWarningtoHumanity and now all can show your support by sharing the following link: https://doi.org/10.1093/biosci/bix125
or
I signed the #ScientistsWarningtoHumanity https://doi.org/10.1093/biosci/bix125 and other scientists can still help by endorsing the article here: http://scientistswarning.forestry.oregonstate.edu/

Thanks again for signing the article,
William (Bill) J. Ripple, Distinguished Professor of Ecology, Oregon State University
Ps. The concern for a liveable world has become a global movement as we can see with the nomination of three environmental pioneers for the Nobel Peace Prize. Check out this website NP4SD.org if you wish to endorse-nominate awarding the Nobel Peace Prize (themed for Sustainable Development) jointly to the Club of Rome, Dr. Herman Daly and Pope Francis.







 

ACTION ALERTS

Restore and Protect Wetlands and Mangroves in Chicxulub Port, Yucatán, México SIGN THE PETITION

President Abdulla Yameen: Stop Destruction of Kulhudhuffushi Mangroves! CLICK HERE

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We invite all school children from tropical and sub-tropical nations, and those who love mangroves, to create art for the 2019 Children's Art Calendar DEADLINE IS MARCH 15 CLICK HERE



VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY

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MANGROVE ISSUES 

Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION


What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

What is EPIC? - 
The Ecosystems Protecting Infrastructure and Communities (EPIC) project:  the role of ecosystems as protective barriers against climate induced hazards

View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  
WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE 
Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

The Value of Mangrove Forests View Video

Protecting the sea for people:  a new WFF video on the Philippines largest marine protect area
View Video


CBEMR Experience Exchange MAP 2017 English Subtitles
VIEW THE VIDEO

Mangroves: Guidebook to Malaysia – available for download here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE
SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".

Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
EPIC-Film 2
 
Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more
 

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

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MAP Education Director Martin Keeley’s most recent book is Marvellous Mangroves: Myths and Legends, a compilation of stories from “Mangrove Peoples”—those who live on shorelines where mangroves thrive—from around the world. READ MORE

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges


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Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW

VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

FREE MAP Mangrove e-cards CLICK HERE
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MAP’s e-Cards offer you a unique way to spread the word about MAP’s good works, while sharing beautiful photographs of the mangroves
 
Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier

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It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result. —Mahatma Gandhi

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

 
 Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE
VOLUNTEER WITH MAP
 
"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection

Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP


Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp
Join MAP on Facebook
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Note to Our Readers:
We strive to keep active links in our newsletter. However, due to circumstances beyond our control, occasionally links to stories may become broken. If you find a link to a story is not functioning, please cut and paste the headline into your browser search bar. In most cases you should be able to locate the original story.


Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:
Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games
Visit the Mangrove Action Project recycle website Click on the recycle button then click on the Download Shipping Label, and follow the instructions.

 
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Mangrove Action Project
Click here to view past newsletters
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Thursday, December 21, 2017

MAP NEWS Issue 432 - Dec 23, 2017

Mangrove Action Project

The MAP News
432nd Edition                                                     Dec. 23, 2017

FEATURE STORY
 
Still time to make your 2017 Tax-Deductible Donation to MAP!
Make a difference for coastal communities
Families who call mangroves home need your support
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“I still remember that day we got to work together to improve the hydrology at the restoration site. Many people dug in the pond, working together and I could see that they felt that the land had returned to them again. It made me so happy. I felt like despite all the problems we faced we finally felt united in the village.” Ms. Ladda Ardharn (Pink), the youth group leader at Ban Talae Nok, was instrumental in the success of the project there and pursued solutions when the land tenure issue gridlocked the project from proceeding. At one point, she organized a petition to demand their land back. It was not easy for a young woman to take a strong and active role against an influential male community member. She and the other members of the youth group had the motivation it takes to make real, lasting change – and you can give them the technical support and opportunity to make it happen. “Since we started working on this restoration together, the people of my community have hope again.”

Your contribution is about more than money – it is about working together with villagers like Pink, and empowering young people to become caretakers of their environments. It is about partnering to address global challenges with local solutions. You belong to a global mangrove community, and your investment in women like Pink will mean a brighter and more secure future for us all.

The families who call mangroves home need your support. Please give a gift by December 31. READ MORE
 
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SPECIAL MALDIVES REPORT

2,500 trees to be cut down for Kulhudhuffushi airport
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MALDIVES - The Kulhudhuffushi council expects about 2,500 trees and plants to be felled or removed from the island’s mangrove forest for the construction of an airport. With dredging and land reclamation expected to begin in early November, the wetland area in the island’s northern end is now under the authority of the Regional Airports department of the tourism ministry, the island council president Abdul Latheef Hassan told the Maldives Independent. “It is up to Regional Airports to decide when to cut down trees in the kulhi,” he said by phone Monday morning. “We shared the land use plan of Kulhudhuffushi that includes the airport with the people before the end of July. We’ve also counted and marked the coconut palm trees two months ago after a request from the housing ministry and opened for complaints regarding the procedure.” Latheef added that the council has also contacted families who would have to move from the airport construction site. READ MORE

Maldives switches focus from climate threat to mass tourism
Maldives for sale
MALDIVES - When Mohamed Nasheed, the young, first democratically elected president of the Maldives, said in 2008 that he was seeking to buy a new homeland to save his people from being inundated by rising sea levels, it made the country of 1,200 coral islands the moral leader in the UN climate talks and helped persuade rich countries to act. This week the Maldives, under new president Abdulla Yameen, apparently changed environmental tack, saying that mass tourism and mega-developments rather than solar power and carbon neutrality would enable it to adapt itself to climate change and give its young population hope for the future. As rumours abound that Yameen has been negotiating to sell an entire atoll with 19 coral islands and dozens of reefs and lagoons to the Saudi royal family for $10bn (£8bn), his ministers outlined plans to geo-engineer artificial islands, relocate populations and attract millions more tourists by creating 50 more resorts. READ MORE

International experts called on Maldives to designate HDh. Keylakunu a 'Mangrove Wild Reserve', in 2001!
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MALDIVES - n the Maldivian government to declare Keylakunu island of Haa Dhaalu atoll as a 'Mangrove Wild Reserve'. Amid its efforts to create awareness on the importance of the uninhabited island, RaajjeTV has obtained a copy of a letter sent by ISME's Executive Secretary Shigeyuki Baba, addressed to Maldives' then Director of Environmental Affairs, recommending that Keylakunu island is designated as a Wild Mangrove Reserve in the Maldives 'not only for our generation but also future generations'. In the letter, Professor Shigeyuki noted that he, along with a team from ISME, had visited mangrove forests in Kumundhoo, Neykurendhoo and Keylakunu islands in Haa Dhaalu atolls and Baarah island in Haa Alifu. READ MORE

HDh. Keylakunu is one of the few places that show the Maldives' biodiversity
MALDIVES - Ecocare Maldives has said that Keylakunu Island of Haa Dhaalu atoll 'is one of a kind' and that 'we should be proud' of it. The organization's Director of Advocacy, Maeed Mohamed Zahir emphasized that the Avicennia marina forest found in Keylakunu cannot be found anywhere else in the world, especially not in an island ecosystem. Noting that 'there are just a few places in the Maldives that shows its rich biodiversity,' Maeed said that Keylakunu is one such place, highlighting the importance of protecting the island. He also noted that international experts had, back in the early 2000s, recommended the Maldivian government to declare Keylakunu a biosphere reserve. READ MORE

Conservation and Management of Maldivian Mangrove Habitats – Baseline Study
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MALDIVES - Maldives is known for its coral reefs and beaches; mangrove ecosystems in Maldives are over-shadowed by these environments and oftentimes neglected and under constant anthropogenic threats despite its crucial ecological and geomorphological function to this small island nation. This study aims at establishing a baseline of environmental conditions of significant mangrove habitats throughout the country. Data and information collected via this study will provide a foundation for conservation efforts to build upon and help future environmental monitoring of said environments. READ MORE

ASIA

720 volunteers clean up mangroves along Bandra's Carter Road of 3,000 kg trash
720 volunteers
INDIA - The Maharashtra State Mangrove Cell began its city-wide 'Clean Mangrove' campaign on Saturday, and started with removing 3,000 kg garbage from Carter Road in Bandra. In all, 720 volunteers, including students from Rizvi College, St Andrew High School, St Pauls Institute of Communication Education, and RD National College, local residents, and cell members participated in the drive. The Mangrove Cleanup drive is expected to continue until May 31, 2018, and eight locations - Dahisar, Borivli, Versova, Bandra, Sewri, Bhandup, Airoli, and Turbhe - have been identified. N Vasudevan, additional principal chief conservator of forest, along with senior officials were present at the event at Carter Road. He said: "This will be a regular clean-up drive and will be done on a rotational basis. On weekdays, our officers and workers from the municipal corporation will clean these areas and on weekends, volunteers will supplement these efforts. The idea is to clear the trash near the roots of the trees." READ MORE

AFRICA

Nasako Besingi released
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CAMEROON - On 27 November 2017, the Examining Military Judge in Buea, Cameroon, officially dropped all charges and signed the release order for human rights defender Nasako Besingi, who was subsequently released following over two months in detention. Nasako Besingi is a human rights defender and the director of Struggle to Economize the Future Environment – SEFE, a non-governmental organisation based in the village of Mundemba, Ndian Division, Cameroon, which has asserted the land rights of local communities in the context of the development of palm oil plantations. Nasako Besingi has been leading his community in the protests against the development of palm oil plantations by the American agribusiness company Herakles Farm. Most recently, the human rights defender has vehemently condemned the situation with regards to the human rights violations in context of the current crises in the Anglophone regions of Cameroon. READ MORE

Jury still out on huge mangrove regeneration project in Senegal
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SENEGAL - Climate change (lower rainfall, rising sea levels, and harsh droughts) coupled with unsustainable human exploitation has seen some 40 percent of Senegal’s mangrove cover lost since the 1970s. It’s a region of rich biodiversity: some 2,000 species of fish, molluscs, and crustaceans live among the roots and mud of the mangroves. For Ablaye Marone, who works as an volunteer guide and ranger in the national park that covers 76,000 of the delta’s 146,000 hectares, it’s a lot more than that. He told IRIN that replanting schemes are “a question of survival”. “We make a living only from mangroves,” he explained. “Take me for example. Aside from activities as a guard, I place beehives in the mangroves to collect honey. I make a lot of money doing this that allows me to make ends meet. If there were no more mangroves, there would be no more bees.” Adjarata Diouf, who also lives in Marone’s village of Bagadadji, explained how the mangroves “provide an essential source of revenue for women here”. “They offer ideal conditions for the reproduction of fish and shellfish. Our main economic activity is harvesting oysters, from which we make a significant revenue,” she told IRIN. READ MORE

AMERICA

The Truth about Shrimp Rings
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CANADA - Ready-to-eat shrimp rings have had their fair share of mud thrown at them. Over the years, social justice and environmental crusaders have pointed out the problems with these cheap mainstays of December holiday parties in North America. Shrimp rings are emblematic of the pervasiveness of budget shrimp in grocery stores and at restaurants, yet they remain as popular as ever. The world consumes more than eight million tonnes of shrimp annually, and farmed shrimp makes up a bigger fraction every year. Most of the shrimp exported across the world come from Asia and Latin America—China, Vietnam, India, Thailand, Indonesia, and Ecuador are major producers. There’s nothing small about the shrimp business, including its impact on vulnerable people and environments. It’s always a good time to just say no to the ring of injustice, pollution, and coastal degradation. Share some of these facts while lingering with friends and acquaintances over the holiday trough, a communal reminder that there are happier things to eat over the holidays. But don’t despair, there is a way to change this narrative, one story at a time. READ MORE

Amazonian fish need tropical forests to survive
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BRAZIL - Even fish can be treehuggers. In a large study published recently, fisheries ecologists at Virginia Tech have found a link between tropical forest loss in the Amazon and declines in freshwater fish populations. Their work could inspire new policy protections for tropical forests on the Amazon river floodplain, where fishing is a major source of income and food. Virginia Tech’s Leandro Castello’s team reports in the journal Fish and Fisheries that lakes in the Amazon River floodplain with a larger forest amount had a greater fishery yield, demonstrating a relationship between the forest and fish. Forest survival accounted for 85 percent of fishery yields for the majority of species examined. Prior work found 56 percent of the forest in these areas were lost to clearing for plantations and cattle ranching in recent years. Many scientists are concerned about drought, carbon emissions and degraded water quality. But Castello cautions that the problem extend beyond the land. “Everyone talks about deforestation as a terrestrial issue – carbon stock, climate change. This study shows that in river basins such as the Amazon, deforestation an issue of food security for the local people,” Castello said. READ MORE

GLOBAL

World Bank to end financial support for oil and gas extraction
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GLOBAL - The World Bank will end its financial support for oil and gas extraction within the next two years in response to the growing threat posed by climate change. In a statement that delighted campaigners opposed to fossil fuels, the Bank used a conference in Paris to announce that it “will no longer finance upstream oil and gas” after 2019. The Bank ceased lending for coal-fired power stations in 2010 but has been under pressure from lobby groups also to halt the $1bn (£750m) a year it has been lending for oil and gas in developing countries. The Bank said it saw the need to change the way it was operating in a “rapidly changing world”, adding that it was on course to have 28% of its lending going to climate action by 2020. At present, 1-2% of the Bank’s $280bn portfolio is accounted for by oil and gas projects. In exceptional circumstances, the Bank said it would consider lending for oil and gas projects in the very poorest countries but only where it helped the poor get access to energy and the project did not conflict with commitments to reduce greenhouse gases made in the 2015 Paris climate change accord. READ MORE

A Productivity Paradox In Very Wet Mangrove Forests Of The Neotropics?
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GLOBAL - A group of researchers from Colombia (Universidad del Valle) and Germany (Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research-ZMT) joined efforts to produce an ecosystem model of a mangrove area in the Panama Bight eco-region synthesizing for the first time knowledge from a particular system – Bahía Málaga in the Colombian Pacific coast – collected in the last ~10 years. The mangroves here are probably the wettest in the world, – rainfall can easily reach 7 m every year -, and represent an especially interesting system to investigate which factors determine the productivity of a mangrove ecosystem. The resulting EwE model of Bahía Málaga indicated that mangrove trees contributed most to the biomass of the whole system (96%) and that secondary production in the form of macrobenthos (crabs, cockles) and fish biomass was extremely low compared to that of other mangrove systems. The transfer of energy through trophic levels seems to be very low in this system being the reason for an impoverished biomass of primary and secondary order consumers. The characteristics of this system indicate that despite being little affected by anthropogenic activities, any increase in such activities (i.e. fishing) may severely affect the capacity of the mangrove to deliver food to human populations. The astounding nature of this mangrove forest contrasts with the apparent natural scarcity of other biotic living forms in this system in an unexpected productivity paradox. READ MORE
 
 
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ACTION ALERTS

President Abdulla Yameen: Stop Destruction of Kulhudhuffushi Mangroves! CLICK HERE

EARTHCORPS IS HIRING 2018 INTERNATIONAL PARTICIPANTS Do you know a young adult who is working in the environmental field and is looking for an opportunity to advance their career? Tell them about EarthCorps!

EPIC REPORT Download the paper ‘Mangrove Restoration: to plant or not to plant’, available in 7 languages.

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We invite all school children from tropical and sub-tropical nations, and those who love mangroves, to create art for the 2019 Children's Art Calendar CLICK HERE



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MANGROVE ISSUES 

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Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION


What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  
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Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

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Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

The Value of Mangrove Forests View Video

Protecting the sea for people:  a new WFF video on the Philippines largest marine protect area
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CBEMR Experience Exchange MAP 2017 English Subtitles
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Mangroves: Guidebook to Malaysia – available for download here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE
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CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".

Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
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Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more
 

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

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MAP Education Director Martin Keeley’s most recent book is Marvellous Mangroves: Myths and Legends, a compilation of stories from “Mangrove Peoples”—those who live on shorelines where mangroves thrive—from around the world. READ MORE

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
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Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
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Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

FREE MAP Mangrove e-cards CLICK HERE
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MAP’s e-Cards offer you a unique way to spread the word about MAP’s good works, while sharing beautiful photographs of the mangroves
 
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It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result. —Mahatma Gandhi

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

 
 Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE
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"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
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Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection

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Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:
Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games
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