Thursday, August 3, 2017

MAP News Issue 422, August 5, 2017

Mangrove Action Project

The MAP News
422nd Edition                                                     August 5, 2017

FEATURE STORY
 
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project has been crying out for 25 years to help stop the needless destruction of mangrove ecosystems. We welcome the renewed energy of The Global Mangrove Alliance in recognizing the important role mangroves play in preserving and protecting the Earth’s fragile balance of life. We invite them to join us in lessons learned from a quarter century of active environmental restoration.
Ecological underdogs vital to defense of coastlines
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GLOBAL - The Global Mangrove Alliance is a new effort to mobilize the world to stop mangrove deforestation and to undertake a massive restoration effort. The goal of the Alliance is to expand overall extent of mangrove forests 20 percent by 2030. WWF, Conservation International, The Nature Conservancy, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Wetlands International have joined together to take up this challenge. And that list is growing. The Global Mangrove Alliance was born of the belief that a renewed effort is needed across multiple sectors and geographies to give mangroves their due, and to massively scale and accelerate conservation and restoration of mangrove ecosystems. The know-how exists; it is the will and interest to act that needs bolstering. The Paris agreement and its focus on developing country-by-country plans to reduce carbon emissions is a new moment that will allow us to both accelerate existing work to protect and restore mangroves while generating and funneling significant new global investment. If we can generate enough momentum to accomplish these ambitious aims, we can improve the well-being of tens of millions of people and revitalize critical coastal ecosystems. READ MORE

ASIA

Mangroves vital for environmental decontamination
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INDONESIA - Mangrove trees, particularly their leaf litter, filter copper out of soil and water in Indonesia. Grey mangrove trees, Avicennia marina, filter heavy metals out of the surrounding soil and water. A new study from Indonesia has found that their leaf litter accumulates the most copper, followed by leaves and then roots. Researchers from Universitas Diponegoro analysed copper concentrations in a mangrove forest in Tapak Tuguerjo, an area along the northern coast of Java, Indonesia. The forest is downstream from a river polluted by a nearby factory. Copper concentrations in seawater samples from the study area ranged from 0.02 milligrams per litre (mg/L) to 0.05 mg/L; as much as six times the 0.008 mg/L maximum permissible level for marine biota set by the Indonesian Ministry of Envi-ronment. Over the span of 12 weeks, the team collected samples of water, soil, roots, young leaves and leaf litter (fallen leaves). After drying and grinding the plant material, they analysed its copper content using atomic absorption spectroscopy. READ MORE

Explore the unexpected beauty of Sri Lanka's mangroves
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SRI LANKA - Tourism in Sri Lanka -- the tropical island nation just a stone's throw from the tip of southern India -- is on an upswing, thanks to thousands of miles of sugar-sand coastline, lush interiors dotted with tea plantations and the mystique of a place that's still relatively undiscovered. And while the country's pristine beaches, not yet overrun with tourists or towering condos, draw budget and luxury travelers alike from around the world, a different kind of coastal tableau -- shallow, shore-hugging waters where mangrove forests grow -- is not only worth exploring, but a matter of national attention. At Negombo, a laid-back beach town roughly 20 miles north of the country's capital, Colombo, tours of the area's wetlands start across the street from the Muthurajawela Visitor Centre, in the gray-green waters of the Dutch Canal. READ MORE

Protecting mangroves and fish stocks from dams and deforestation
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BANGLADESH - The impact of dams on the diversity of fish is a telling example of the unintended consequences of human activity. Building dams and other hydrological barriers affects mangrove forests by choking off sediment loading, while increasing nutrient pollution. Some of the impacts of these barriers on fish diversity are set out in a recent study by the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment (ATREE), a Bangalore-based research organisation. The study compared the different species found upstream and downstream of dams. As this can depend on a number of factors — agriculture, deforestation, urbanisation and location — the study separates all factors to extract just the impact of the hydrological barriers and found that the impact on the number of species is felt most immediately downstream. It also found that the recovery of species numbers downstream is enhanced by an increase in the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, but hampered by an increase in alkalinity. READ MORE

Two of Mumbai’s mangrove forests on list of 12 unique wetlands in India
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INDIA - The Mangrove Society of India (MSI) has put two of Mumbai region’s mangroves — Airoli and Vikhroli wetlands — among 12 unique mangrove forests in the country. Mangrove forests grow in creeks, estuaries, bays and lagoons and in inter-tidal areas – area between the high tide and the low tide. Their ecosystem is believed to have evolved around 114 million years back in tropical and subtropical regions and India has 3% (4,740 sq km) of the world’s mangrove cover. The unique mangroves located along India’s 7,516-km coastline are in Gujarat, Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka, Kerala, Odisha, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The world’s largest mangrove forests in Sunderbans, West Bengal, are also featured in the list. The list was released by the MSI and the Goa state biodiversity board at the National Mangrove Conference in Dona Paula, Goa recently. Maharashtra is the only state to have a dedicated cell protecting its mangrove cover. READ MORE

AMERICAS

Business owners in top Belize destination want increased mangrove protections
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BELIZE – Walking the shore of San Pedro provides a solid picture of the tension between natural resources and the economy in this, the top tourist town in coastal Belize. White coral sand gives way to several hundred feet of stunningly deep blue water out to where Caribbean waves strike the Mesoamerican Reef, the world’s second longest barrier reef, which stretches from Honduras in the south to its Mexican terminus to the north. Just below swooping frigatebirds stands a phalanx of hotels, ranging from funky and low slung to sleek, new, and relatively tall. Bars, restaurants and dive shops elbow right up to the water’s edge, too, where one can sit in a plastic chair drinking local rum while dangling your feet in the warm tide at establishments with names like “Sandy Toes.” But walk north along the beachfront just a little ways and your path is diverted away from the water by a wiry stand of mangrove trees growing in the gentle waves. This mangrove belongs to yet another open-air bar, La Choza, and reminds one of what this whole area once looked like. READ MORE

Mexico launches pioneering scheme to insure its coral reef
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MEXICO - A stretch of coral reef off Mexico is the testing ground for a new idea that could protect fragile environments around the world: insurance. The reef, off the coast of Cancún, is the first to be protected under an insurance scheme by which the premiums will be paid by local hotels and government, and money to pay for the repair of the reef will be released if a storm strikes. Coral reefs offer a valuable buffer against storm damage from waves but their condition has deteriorated in recent years, the result of human exploitation and destruction of the reefs, as well as climate change, plastic waste and the acidification of the oceans. READ MORE

History Made In Bimini, Government Are You Listening?
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BAHAMAS - ON July 14, history was made in North Bimini. On this sleepy little island with a total population of barely 3000, more than 200 people marched from Paradise Point to Resorts World Bimini, holding placards high and their heads even higher. Their demands were selfless and supported by experts, conservationists and those who care about the marine environment from around the world – stop the wanton destruction of Bimini’s fragile environment and put in place measures to protect what is left. To understand how significant and historic this was and what the people who participated are crying out for we need to first appreciate the extreme unlikeliness of an organised march in Bimini. First, the historic event that took equal doses of energy, organisation, frustration and anger took place on Bimini, a place where you would be hard-pressed to find any travel piece that did not describe the tiny island in the sun as sleepy or laid-back. This is not a college town nor a city given to uprisings. This was a march driven by a single unifying cry – to save the island that those who are fortunate enough to live there love, and those who visit on a regular basis think of as their second home. READ MORE

GLOBAL

Mangrove Day
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GLOBAL - Message from Ms Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO on the occasion of the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem: Coastal mangroves are among the most threatened ecosystems on earth. Current estimates indicate that up to 67% of mangroves have been lost to date, and nearly all unprotected mangroves could perish over the next 100 years. The stakes are high, because mangrove ecosystems provide benefits and services that are essential for life. From advancing food security, sustaining fisheries and forest products and offering protection from storms, tsunamis and sea level rise to preventing shoreline erosion, regulating coastal water quality and providing habitats for endangered marine species — the list is long on the importance of mangrove ecosystems. This includes the unique role that they play in sequestering and storing significant amounts of coastal blue carbon from the atmosphere and ocean, crucial for mitigating climate change. UNESCO is drawing on all of its strengths — through its Man and the Biosphere Programme, its International Hydrological Programme, its Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and the Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems Programme — to protect mangrove ecosystems. This action reaches across the world, from the Bosque de Paz Transboundary Biosphere Reserve in Ecuador and Peru and the Delta de Saloum Biosphere Reserve in Senegal to the Langkawi UNESCO Global Geopark in Malaysia. READ MORE
 
 
 
VOLUNTEER WITH MAP
 
LAST WORD
 
Dear colleagues,

Happy World Mangrove Day. On this special day, I would like to draw your attention to a discussion paper ‘Mangrove Restoration: to plant or not to plant?’ that raises attention for the multifunctional multiple benefits of the ‘Ecological Mangrove Restoration approach’. It is now available in English, Spanish, Khmer, Vietnamese, Burmese, Thai and Indonesian.

Worldwide, hundreds of thousands of hectares of mangroves have been planted. Unfortunately, the majority of planting efforts fail as planted seedlings die. Even if seedlings survive, the benefits of planting mangroves for increased community resilience are questionable.

The Ecological Mangrove Restoration approach focuses on creating the right biophysical and socio-economic conditions for mangroves to grow back naturally. Compared to planting efforts, ‘natural regeneration’ of mangroves leads to higher survival rates, and results in a more biodiverse, resilient and productive mangrove forest, enhancing community livelihoods and reducing disaster risk.

Lessons learnt were compiled by Wetlands International (in collaboration with its partners of the Building with Nature Indonesia programme), Mangrove Action Project, Mangroves for the Future and the IUCN Mangrove Specialist Group (MSG). The mangrove experts encourages NGOs and funding agencies to be more cautious when implementing restoration projects and recommend involving restoration ecologists and experts in flood risk management.

I hope the paper is useful to you. Later in the year, French, Filipino and Malaysian versions will be distributed.

Download the paper ‘Mangrove Restoration: to plant or not to plant’, available in 7 languages.

With best regards,
Susanna Tol
Senior Communications and Advocacy Officer
Wetlands International
P.O. Box 471, 6700AL Wageningen, The Netherlands
Tel: +31(0)318 660927
www.wetlands.org

 
The Environmental Leadership and Training Initiative (ELTI) at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies is pleased to announce our upcoming online training course that will take place from September 25 to November 5, 2017, entitled: Tropical Forest Restoration in Human-Dominated Landscapes VIEW MORE

Download the paper ‘Mangrove Restoration: to plant or not to plant’, available in 7 languages.

MAP’s Children’s Calendar artwork deadline extended to Aug 31. We need your art. Shools invited to send late submissions
Calling schools, teachers and students!
DEADLINE EXTENDED TO AUG 31!

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We invite all school children from tropical and sub-tropical nations, and those who love mangroves, to create art for the 2018 Children's Art Calendar CLICK HERE

ACTION ALERTS
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY
Become a volunteer at Gunjur Environmental Protection and Development Group (Gambia) GEPADG, see the photos below on some volunteer activities. http://gepadg.jilankanet.com/our-volunteers/4548872938


The Value of Mangrove Forests View Video

Protecting the sea for people:  a new WFF video on the Philippines largest marine protect area
View Video


The entire Los Cedros Eco System is under attack. This is a call for help. Let’s make it known- Mother Earth is NOT open for business. SIGN OUR PETITION

CBEMR Experience Exchange MAP 2017 English Subtitles
VIEW THE VIDEO

Save the mangrove forest in Pitas (Sabah), Eastern Malaysia
Please support this important alert being launched by Forest Peoples Program (FPP) SIGN PETITION
VIEW VIDEO


The world's largest mangrove forest is in danger from a massive coal plant.
UNESCO can put pressure on India and Bangladesh to protect the forest, but they need to see that people around the world are speaking out. Click here to add your voice

Mangroves: Guidebook to Malaysia – available for download here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE
 
STOP PLANTING MANGROVES ON SEAGRASS BEDS _ A CALL TO ACTION
Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION

What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".

Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
EPIC-Film 2
 
Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more
 
Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

Marvellous-Mangroves-Myths-and-Legends-Promo
MAP Education Director Martin Keeley’s most recent book is Marvellous Mangroves: Myths and Legends, a compilation of stories from “Mangrove Peoples”—those who live on shorelines where mangroves thrive—from around the world. READ MORE

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges


MAP%20Curriculum%20Video
Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW

VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

FREE MAP Mangrove e-cards CLICK HERE
Mangrove-Roots-from-Below-Columbia-277x186

MAP’s e-Cards offer you a unique way to spread the word about MAP’s good works, while sharing beautiful photographs of the mangroves
Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier

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It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result. —Mahatma Gandhi

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

 
 Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE
MANGROVE ISSUES 
View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

 
"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog

Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection

Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP

Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp
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Click here to subscribe.
Mangrove Action Project

Note to Our Readers:
We strive to keep active links in our newsletter. However, due to circumstances beyond our control,
occasionally links to stories may become broken. If you find a link to a story is not functioning, please cut and paste the headline into your browser search bar. In most cases you should be able to locate the original story.



Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:
Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games
Visit the Mangrove Action Project recycle website Click on the recycle button then click on the Download Shipping Label, and follow the instructions.

 
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Mangrove Action Project
Click here to view past newsletters
MAPNEWS_website

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

To Plant or Not to Plant




Experts draw attention to a successful method of mangrove regeneration on International Mangrove Day, 26th July 2017
Today, on the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem, conservation organisations and mangrove specialists worldwide highlight the multifunctional benefits of the practice of ‘natural regeneration’ of mangroves.  Compared to planting efforts, survival rates are considerably higher and it results in a more biodiverse, resilient and productive mangrove forest, enhancing community livelihoods and reducing disaster risk. 
During the last decade enormous interest has been raised in the role mangroves can play in reducing tropical storm, coastal erosion and flood risk for coastal communities. Across the world hundreds of thousands of hectares of mangroves have been actively planted. But the majority of planting efforts fail as planted seedlings die and even if seedlings survive, the ecological value of a monoculture and benefits of the planting efforts for increased community resilience are questionable.

Wetlands International, Mangrove Action Project, Mangroves for the Future and the IUCN Mangrove Specialist Group (MSG) say that a more appropriate mangrove restoration is urgently needed worldwide to enhance coastal safety, fisheries, aquaculture and carbon sequestration. To support best practices, they pulled together lessons learnt in a discussion paper and raise attention for the ‘Ecological Mangrove Restoration approach’ (Lewis 2014). This approach focuses on creating the right biophysical and socio-economic conditions for mangroves to grow back naturally which results in the establishment of a sizeable, diverse, functional and self-sustaining mangrove forest that offers benefits both for nature and people.

The paper is available in English, Spanish, Khmer, Vietnamese, Burmese, Thai and Indonesian to assist parts of the world where mangroves have been lost or degraded, along with their valuable services. Later in the year also French, Filipino and Malaysian translations will be distributed. 

While planting can assist or enrich the natural regeneration process, frequently wrong species are planted in the wrong places. Mono-species planting can lead to non-functional mangroves, with limited benefits and low resilience. Planting in the wrong places, such as in areas that were not previously covered by mangroves can lead to damage to other ecosystems or can block sediment and water flows. 

The conservation organisations and mangrove experts encourages local NGOs and big funding agencies to be more cautious when implementing restoration projects and recommend involving restoration ecologists and experts in flood risk management. The importance of understanding the restoration site with a proper risk assessment and receiving advice on the best practices at the specific site, along with local experts, is key to effective mangrove rehabilitation.

They also recommend, to avoid mangrove reconversion, that economic activities are developed that provide sustainable benefits from the restored goods and services, thereby strengthening the business case for restoration. This means that local communities need to be empowered and authorities need to be involved from the onset of restoration plans. 

Download the paper ‘Mangrove Restoration: to plant or not to plant’, available in 7 languages.

For more information:

Wetlands International, Susanna Tol: susanna.tol@wetlands.org
Mangrove Action Project, Jim Enright: mapasia@mangrovactionproject.org 
Mangroves for the Future, Ann Moey: ann.moey@iucn.org

Contributing partners:

Indonesian Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries 
Indonesian Ministry of Public Affairs and Housing
Ecoshape
Wetlands International
Deltares
Blue Forests
Wageningen University & Research
Mangrove Action Project (MAP)
Mangroves for the Future 
IUCN Mangrove Specialist Group (MSG)
Cambodia: Participatory Management of Coastal Resources of Cambodia (PMCR)
Myanmar:  ACTED, Mangrove Service Network (MSN)
Thailand: Mangrove Action Project (MAP)
Vietnam: Mangrove Ecosystem Research Center (MERC)
El Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarollo (PNUD) 
Conservación Internacional Panamá
MiAMBIENTE
Autoridad de los Recursos Acuáticos de Panamá (ARAP)


Monday, July 24, 2017

MAP celebrates 25 years of Mangrove Action with Mangrove Action Day, July 26, 2017


    Mangrove Action Project is proud to celebrate 25 years of working to expand the awareness of mangrove forests and the people who depend upon them. Twenty-five years ago, raising the public awareness on mangroves and roles they play in fisheries, human safety, carbon-storage, coral reel protection, migratory bird habitat, and myriads of other benefits and value, seemed nearly insurmountable. Forests were being decimated, and destructive forces seemed unwilling to listen to the small voices of communities and NGO who cried out against it.

    However, here we are in 2017, celebrating Mangrove Action Day which has been recognized by the United Nations and endorsed by countless communities and organizations, both public and private around the globe. We here at MAP are pleased to join in for the Mangrove Action Day July 26, 2017 activities. It is now apparent that the entire world has joined us in recognizing the role these vital forest ecosystems play in human life as well as the planet's life. However, there is still much to be done. Coal fired power plants, dams, overfishing, coastal development and yes, still, unsustainable shrimp farming continue to destroy countless hectares of forest annually. 

    As you remember Mangrove Action Day today, we encourage you to use your small voice to continue to work towards a healthier future; for the planet and for our children.

MAP-Asia organized 2 special events to commemorate International Mangrove Action Day, 26 July, 2017

EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP On 11th July, an environmental education activity was held at Ban Bang Kang Khao School in Trang, Thailand where the students learned all about the mangrove ecosystem from MAP facilitator, Udom Pariwatpan (Em), and then all 20 students went to visit the nearby community Community-based Ecological Mangrove Restoration (CBEMR) site to identify mangrove plant and animal species.   Students also learned how to do transect monitoring, putting their species ID skills to the test.  The school principal, Ms.Wimala Thongnoo, has been a keen supporter of MAP’s EE activities at the school over the past 5 years under the Global Nature Fund, Dailmer AG and the Body Shop Foundation donors.




ART CONTEST MAP staff, Jim, Ning and Em organized a mangrove art contest on 26th July at Tasanook School in Phang Nga province.  It’s expected that 30 children will join in the event which will be followed by a trip to the MAP supported mangrove interpretative natural trail completed in 2016 under the Dailmer AG  project.  The winning art pieces will sent to MAP’s headquarters is the USA to be entered onto the annual mangrove art contest with the final 12 winning art pieces, obtaining a month in the 2018 MAP Mangrove Art Calendar.

Marvelous Mangroves Curriculum Workshop in Surinam

Led by MAP’s education director, Martin Keeley, and CORE’s director Loes Trustfull, participants spent of their time learning how to deliver simple and practical hands-on activities to their students and communities which give students a basic understanding of the science behind mangrove ecology. The activities were selected from MAP’s Marvellous Mangroves of Suriname, a 350-page teachers curriculum-based resource guide developed initially by Mr. Keeley for the Cayman Islands, which has been adapted and translated for use in thirteen countries worldwide. “Each of the hands-on activities uses simple items found in every household which cost little – if any – money. This makes it easier for teachers to use the materials when demonstrating to students basic scientific and ecological principles,” explains Mr. Keeley. “The theory behind the activities is explained in easy-to-teach terms, and the curriculum contains many illustrations that reinforce both theory and hands-on activities.”

Mangrove Action Day Walk - Seattle Washington, USA


MAP'S Seattle office hosted a Mangrove Action Day event in Seattle at the Arboretum with both Sara Lavenhar and Alfredo Quarto presenting. The event was open to the public. Please see the event flyer and the link to the event page: 

mangrove.is Photo Contest



For the third year in a row, we are also holding our mangrove.is photo contestraising awareness of the connections people have with mangrove forests by creating a global photography exhibition. photos were part of a special exhibition that will help spread the importance of mangroves. At the event in Seattle, viewers had the chance to view incredible photos from years prior, and vote for their favorites to determine the winner! 

2018 Children's Art Calendar



We invite all primary school children from tropical and sub-tropical nations, and whose schools are located near mangroves, to create art telling us “why mangroves are important to my community and me?”Selected winners will be published in the 2018 calendar to be distributed internationally to raise awareness of mangrove forest ecology. This colorful calendar has increased in popularity since its first publication in 2002. The 2018 calendar is our 16th edition. We would like to invite children from your country to join in this fantastic creative and educational competition. It is an opportunity for the younger generation to learn about the vital role Mangroves play in the lives of coastal communities and marine life around the world whilst letting them explore their imagination and have fun when creating their pieces of art. This contest aims to promote appreciation and awareness of mangrove forests and communities, while encouraging and listening to creative voices of children living in mangrove regions.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

MAP News Issue 421, Mangrove Action Day July 26, 2017

Mangrove Action Project
The MAP News
421st Edition     MANGROVE ACTION DAY 2017      July 26, 2017
FEATURE STORY
 
MAP celebrates 25 years of Mangrove Action with Mangrove Action Day
SurinamMM
USA - Mangrove Action Project is proud to celebrate 25 years of working to expand the awareness of mangrove forests and the people who depend upon them. Twenty-five years ago, raising public awareness on mangroves and roles they play in fisheries, human safety, carbon-storage, coral reel protection, migratory bird habitat, and myriads of other benefits and value, seemed nearly insurmountable. Forests were being decimated, and destructive forces seemed unwilling to listen to the small voices of communities and NGO who cried out against them. However, here we are in 2017, 25 years later, celebrating Mangrove Action Day which has been recognized by the United Nations and endorsed by countless communities and organizations, both public and private around the globe. We here at MAP are pleased to join in honoring Mangrove Action Day July 26, 2017 activities. It is now apparent that the entire world has joined us in recognizing the role these vital forest ecosystems play in human life as well as the planet's life. However, there is still much to be done. Coal fired power plants, dams, overfishing, coastal development and yes, still, unsustainable shrimp farming continue to destroy countless hectares of forest annually. As you remember Mangrove Action Day today, we encourage you to use your small voice to continue to work towards a healthier future; for the planet and for our children. We are here to attest, it works. READ MORE

AFRICA

Safeguarding Wetlands’: YES Launches Sustainable Environmental Actions
yes-on-wetland
LIBERIA - The Youth Exploring Solutions (YES), an accredited non-for-profit, passionate and voluntary grassroots youth-led development organization has launched a landmark project titled “Promoting Sustainable Environmental Actions”. This project is being supported by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) through the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) unprecedented small grant initiative for youth-led development organization working on environmental issues. The youth leader stressed that the project will involve a crowd-sourcing and voluntary grassroots-based solutions to solving some of the most critical and pressing issues facing the wetlands and mangroves alongside the SKD Boulevard through the ‘Liberian Environmental Awareness Forum’. “Mangroves are among the most productive and biologically complex ecosystems. They allow many species to thrive from starfish to monkey and are important for local communities living along the coastlines.” READ MORE

Tanzania dam threatens Eastern Africa’s largest mangrove forest
Tanzania
TANZANIA - Tanzania's government still wants a hydroelectric dam built in a key wildlife reserve despite mounting appeals from UNESCO. The WWF conservation group says the project also threatens the livelihoods of 200,000 residents. In its report Tuesday cited by Associated Press, the WWF said the project would have much wider impacts such as cutting off wildlife migration routes, endangering existing wetlands and harming the present livelihoods of more than 200,000 residents reliant on fishing downstream of the intended dam. WWF called on Tanzania's government to consider alternative ways to generate electricity, which currently reaches few rural residents. he project would more than double Tanzania's power generation from 1,450 megawatts to at least 4,000 megawatts, the paper said. Currently, the river's coastline delta contains the largest mangrove forest in eastern Africa, about 200 kilometers (120 miles) south of Dar es Salaam. READ MORE

ASIA

To Plant or Not to Plant
To-plant-or-not-to-plant-Wetlands-English-cover
Experts draw attention to a successful method of mangrove regeneration on International Mangrove Day, 26th July 2017
Today, on the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem, conservation organisations and mangrove specialists worldwide highlight the multifunctional benefits of the practice of ‘natural regeneration’ of mangroves. Compared to planting efforts, survival rates are considerably higher and it results in a more biodiverse, resilient and productive mangrove forest, enhancing community livelihoods and reducing disaster risk. During the last decade enormous interest has been raised in the role mangroves can play in reducing tropical storm, coastal erosion and flood risk for coastal communities. Across the world hundreds of thousands of hectares of mangroves have been actively planted. But the majority of planting efforts fail as planted seedlings die and even if seedlings survive, the ecological value of a monoculture and benefits of the planting efforts for increased community resilience are questionable. Wetlands International, Mangrove Action Project, Mangroves for the Future and the IUCN Mangrove Specialist Group (MSG) say that a more appropriate mangrove restoration is urgently needed worldwide to enhance coastal safety, fisheries, aquaculture and carbon sequestration. To support best practices, they pulled together lessons learnt in a discussion paper and raise attention for the ‘Ecological Mangrove Restoration approach’ (Lewis 2014). READ MORE

Lessons on conservation from 'the land of eternal mangroves'
Sri Lanka Group
SRI LANKA - People are still missing in Sri Lanka after devastating floods and landslides last month killed hundreds and displaced thousands on the island nation. But in communities all along the coastline of this island nation in the Indian Ocean, there are efforts to protect ecosystems that could in turn protect the country from rains and storms capable of wiping away entire towns. Sri Lanka is working on mangrove forest protection measures that have been praised as the first of their kind in the world. And while recent heavy rains may have destroyed seedlings, they have only strengthened the determination of the government and its partners to continue their work on mangrove conservation and restoration. “Weather events in Sri Lanka, as elsewhere on the planet, have become more and more extreme and unpredictable. Again and again, communities with intact mangrove forests fare better during and in the aftermath of these events than those where mangroves have been destroyed,” said Karen Peterson. READ MORE

Massive loss in mangrove saplings in last 4 years
mangroves
INDIA - In a massive setback for the environment, more than 94,000 saplings planted by the state mangrove cell at Charkop and Malwani have died in the past four years. Maharashtra government has plans to plant 50 lakh mangrove saplings by 2019 to revive degraded wetlands. The cases of mangrove destruction has been rampant, with at least two per week being recorded in the state. The destruction is continuing despite orders from the Bombay High Court and laws such as the Environment Protection Act, 1986 and Indian Forest Act, 1927, which are supposed to protect the mangrove ecosystem. The state government planted mangrove saplings between 2013 and 2016 across 300 hectares in Mumbai and Navi Mumbai. While 84,000 saplings were planted near Charkop village on 19 hectares — all of which died. Around 20,000 saplings were planted near Manori village of which 10,000 saplings died over the past four years.  READ MORE

Encroached mangrove forest seized in Surat Thani
Mangrove seizure
THAILAND -Authorities seized more than 500 rai of encroached mangrove forest in Tha Chang district. The raid, jointly conducted by the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR), the military and local administrative officers, was part of a national operation to restore mangrove forests. DMCR deputy director-general Sopon Thongdee said a total of 544 rai and 3 blocks of mangrove forest reserve land were confiscated in coastal tambons of Khao Than and Tha Khoei in Tha Chang district. Located on the land were deserted shrimp farms and palm oil plantations. There were no people there. In Surat Thani, over 1,700 rai of encroached mangrove land had also been reclaimed so far. READ MORE

AMERICAS

Why the World’s Rivers Are Losing Sediment and Why It Matters
Elwha-River-revegetation
EDITORS NOTE: The damming of the Mekong is having big effect on the Delta and its mangroves in Vietnam, just as the dams on the Mississippi have had ruinous effects on the delta there and resulted in the loss of about a 50 mile wetland buffer between New Orleans and the sea, resulting in the recent disaster created by Hurricane Katrina. Closer to MAP’s home in Washington State, scientist are seeing an unexpected benefit of sediment on coastal ecologies that may apply to mangrove forests worldwide.
U.S.A. - Elwha and Glines dams on the Elwha River in northwestern Washington state. At the time, it was the largest dam removal project in U.S. history, and it took nearly three years for both barriers to be dismantled and for the river to once again flow freely. Over the course of their nearly century-long lives, the two dams collected more than 24 million cubic yards of sediment behind them, enough to fill the Seattle Seahawks football stadium eight times. And since their removal, the Elwha has taken back the trapped sediment and distributed it downstream, causing the riverine ecosystem to be rebuilt and transformed. Massive quantities of silt, sand, and gravel have been carried to the coast, resurrecting a wetlands ecosystem long deprived of sediment. Scientists are now beginning to fully appreciate the life-giving effects of sediment, which some researchers, as well as people who live along waterways, once viewed as a malevolent force that choked the life out of rivers, streams, and wetlands. READ MORE

Open Source GIS Tools Helping Save Mangrove Forests
Mexico Coast
MEXICO - At the end of the Baja Peninsula between the states of Sinaloa and Nayarit lies the Marismas Nacionales,or National Marshes, the largest intact mangrove forest on the Pacific Coast of Mexico. The ecosystem services provided by these hundreds of square miles of mangrove forests are important to the local economy, especially the families who rely on fishing and shrimping. The mangrove ecosystems in the Marismas Nacionales also provide other benefits sustaining and fulfilling human life, such as local coastal erosion protection and carbon sequestration. Mangrove forests can remove greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and they store enormous amounts of carbon in their sediments, leaves, and other biomass. Yet over the last 45 years, mangrove forests in the Marismas Nacionales have been in decline. The construction of dams is a likely cause. Dams create imbalances in salinity and sediment that can affect large areas of mangrove forest. READ MORE

Walking Trees Terrorize Marshes
Florida Mangroves
Editor’s Note: This recent study predicts salt marshes will be able to keep up with sea level rise & migrate inland, IF there is no hard infrastructure preventing expansion. The other big factor is there no change to the sediment load. Both factors are also critical to mangroves re: sea level rise.
U.S.A. - The good news: mangroves in Florida are on the rise. The bad news: mangroves in Florida are on the rise. In the shadow of the Kennedy Space Center, in Florida’s Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a quiet invasion is taking place. Amid the brackish water and rustling grass that dominate this salt marsh ecosystem, thickets of mangroves—known locally as “walking trees” for their spindly wooden “legs”—are putting down roots. Mangrove forests are critical tropical habitat and are disappearing worldwide. But in Florida, mangroves are booming. Helped along by rising temperatures, mangrove coverage in the Sunshine State’s northern reaches has doubled over the past 30 years. This should be great news for the flagging ecosystem, but the mangrove takeover in Florida is a hostile one. Given time, the colonizing mangroves are likely to entirely consume some of the state’s iconic salt marshes. Coastal ecologist Samantha Chapman from Pennsylvania’s Villanova University and doctoral candidate Cheryl Doughty visited Merritt Island in 2013 to get a sense of how the area could change if the mangroves have their way. Such a shift could be dramatic, they found, but the mangroves’ takeover will have considerable upsides. READ MORE

EUROPE

JULY 26 International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem
July 26 Mangrove Action Day
GLOBAL - Mangroves are rare, spectacular and prolific ecosystems on the boundary between land and sea. They ensure food security for local communities. They provide biomass, forest products and sustain fisheries. They contribute to the protection of coastlines. They help mitigate the effects of climate change and extreme weather events. This is why the protection of mangrove ecosystems is essential today. Their survival faces serious challenges —from the alarming rise of the sea level and biodiversity that is increasingly endangered. The earth and humanity simply cannot afford to lose these vital ecosystems. UNESCO has always been on the frontline of promoting new and harmonious relations between humanity and nature, where the preservation of mangrove ecosystems carries special importance. To this end, UNESCO is working across the board and with all partners on an open initiative on mangroves and sustainable development. UNESCO’s World Network of Biosphere Reserves has 86 sites out of 669 that include areas of mangroves. READ MORE

Sundarbans Solidarity Action Networking and An Alternative Energy Solutions for Bangladesh Aug 19-20
Save the Sundarbans Aug 19-20
GERMANY - The Bangladesh Power Development Board (BPDB) and National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) have signed a joint venture to commission a 1320 MW coal fired power plant, Rampal Power plant in the vicinity of the Sundarbans. From the beginning of the project, we – the concerned citizens, activist groups and organisations, the environment and the ecological experts at national and international levels – have expressed our deep concerns to the destructive project. Despite, unprecedented concerns expressed by numerous environmentalist groups and activists from Bangladesh and all over the world the BIFPCL has recklessly started the construction work of the 1,320 MW coal fired power plant in the vicinity of the Sundarbans in April 2017. Therefore, we are organising an European convention in Berlin to bring together Bangladeshi and international energy experts, activists and advocates to meet in a forum of what we call a diverse yet united platform - where we can express our solidarity to the movement to Save the Sundarbans through productive discussion on the feasibility of renewable energy in Bangladesh. Join us 19-20 August, 2017 READ MORE
 
 
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LAST WORD
 
Dear friends,


We are delighted to present the result of a scientific research project that is fruit of a collaboration between the Federal University of Ceará (UFC) and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). This is the article that has just been published in the journal Ecosystem Services entitled "Neglected ecosystem services: Highlighting the socio-cultural perception of mangroves in decision-making processes." The results were concerned with the proposal of tools for the management and formulation of policies for the conservation of coastal ecosystems, investigating the socio-cultural evaluation of ecosystem services of the mangroves through a case study carried out in the Cumbe community in the State of Ceará, Northeast of Brazil. It is a Quilombola community territory of fishermen and shellfish sharply impacted by shrimp aquaculture. A combination of methodologies was used to complement ecosystem services identified in the academic literature with those perceived by the local community in order to analyze the locally perceived mangroves services in relation to livelihoods. We demonstrated that the local community identified four additional cultural services which were the maintenance of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK), creation and maintenance of social relationships, personal satisfaction and mental and physical relaxation. This demonstrates a symbolic linkage with mangroves beyond the material analysis usually used to evaluate ecosystem services and shows that the sociocultural dimension of mangrove services is an indispensable criterion to be considered in the different decision-making processes. We hope this article will contribute to addressing the challenges for the conservation of coastal ecosystems.


Follow the links to download the article:

Neglected Ecosystems

Socio-Cultural Percepions of Mangroves in Decision Making

Kind regards,
Luciana de Souza Queiroz
Sergio Rossi
Laura Calvet-Mir
Isabel Ruiz-Mallén
Sara García-Betorz
Júlia Salvà-Prat
Antônio Jeovah de Andrade Meireles 
Download the paper ‘Mangrove Restoration: to plant or not to plant’, available in 7 languages.
 

Mangrove.is Photography Contest!
Send us your best photos of mangrove forests to help raise awareness of their importance for this years Mangrove Action Day 2017 ENTER NOW

Calling schools, teachers and students!
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We invite all school children from tropical and sub-tropical nations, and those who love mangroves, to create art for the 2018 Children's Art Calendar CLICK HERE

ACTION ALERTS
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY
Become a volunteer at Gunjur Environmental Protection and Development Group (Gambia) GEPADG, see the photos below on some volunteer activities. http://gepadg.jilankanet.com/our-volunteers/4548872938


The Value of Mangrove Forests View Video

Protecting the sea for people:  a new WFF video on the Philippines largest marine protect area
View Video


The entire Los Cedros Eco System is under attack. This is a call for help. Let’s make it known- Mother Earth is NOT open for business. SIGN OUR PETITION

CBEMR Experience Exchange MAP 2017 English Subtitles
VIEW THE VIDEO

Save the mangrove forest in Pitas (Sabah), Eastern Malaysia
Please support this important alert being launched by Forest Peoples Program (FPP) SIGN PETITION
VIEW VIDEO


The world's largest mangrove forest is in danger from a massive coal plant.
UNESCO can put pressure on India and Bangladesh to protect the forest, but they need to see that people around the world are speaking out. Click here to add your voice

Mangroves: Guidebook to Malaysia – available for download here

Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE
 
STOP PLANTING MANGROVES ON SEAGRASS BEDS _ A CALL TO ACTION
Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION
What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".
Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
EPIC-Film 2

Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more

Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum
 
Marvellous-Mangroves-Myths-and-Legends-Promo
MAP Education Director Martin Keeley’s most recent book is Marvellous Mangroves: Myths and Legends, a compilation of stories from “Mangrove Peoples”—those who live on shorelines where mangroves thrive—from around the world. READ MORE

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

MAP%20Curriculum%20Video
Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW
VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

FREE MAP Mangrove e-cards CLICK HERE
Mangrove-Roots-from-Below-Columbia-277x186
MAP’s e-Cards offer you a unique way to spread the word about MAP’s good works, while sharing beautiful photographs of the mangroves

Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier
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It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result. —Mahatma Gandhi

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

 

 Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE

MANGROVE ISSUES 
View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

Mosaic of Life
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

 

"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection
Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP

Join MAP on Facebook

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

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Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:
Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games
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