Friday, April 11, 2014

MAP News Issue 336, April 12, 2013

VerticalResponse

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

The MAP News
335th Edition                                March 29, 2014

Action Alerts:
 

Save the Date! XIV World Forestry Congress, Durban, South Africa, 7–11 September 2015 READ MORE
 

2015 Children’s Art Calendar Competition - Mangrove Action Project wants you to join us as we celebrate our upcoming 22nd Anniversary of MAP’s ongoing efforts to conserve and restore the world’s mangrove forest wetlands. Again, this year we commemorate those efforts via our inspiring children’s art in MAP’s 14th annual Children’s Mangrove Art Contest for the 2015 Calendar year. READ MORE
Volunteer Needed for Mangrove Ecosystem Monitoring Program READ MORE
 
Your support is needed: Cameroon activists on trial for peaceful
protest against Wall Street land grabber READ MORE
MAP VOLUNTEERS NEEDED IN THAILAND VIEW REQUIREMENTS

Order your 2014 Calendar
2014cld-300x225 
 
Save the Sundarbans from Rampal power plant – View Sample Letter to Minister
Sign the Petition
 
Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition
Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier
Donate.jpg
It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result.
 
—Mahatma Gandhi


Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE


 
URGENT - VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

MAP’s VOLUNTEER INTERNS HELP MAP MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE
READ MORE

 


MANGROVE ISSUES 

View New Videos posted by MAP Asia intern, Delphine. CLICK HERE
 
The importance of restoring mangroves in an effective, long-term manner. Mangrove video - VIEW

Please view our new video for our Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign! It is now on our website under the Question Your Shrimp section heading. WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video
Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE” Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT THESE SIGHTS
SLIDE SHOW
    VIMEO SHOW

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine -
Read More
 


"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog

Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin

LISTEN TO INTERVIEW


Join MAP on Facebook


Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp


Donate.jpg


Not yet a MAP News subscriber?
Click here to subscribe.



Note to Our Readers:
We strive to keep active links in our newsletter. However, due to circumstances beyond our control,
occasionally links to stories may become broken. If you find a link to a story is not functioning, please cut and paste the headline into your browser search bar. In most cases you should be able to locate the original story.




Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:

Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games

Visit the Mangrove Action Project recycle website Click on the recycle button then click on the Download Shipping Label, and follow the instructions.

 

download_shipping_label





 

SHARE MAP'S VISION
CBEMRsuporting MAPs efforts 
Please spread the word by sharing MAP's latest effort to raise awareness of mangroves and the role they play in global climate change mitigation CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".
 
FEATURED STORY
Are Mangroves the Answer Against Global Warming Vulnerability to Disaster?
2_58558_1396705696 
USA- Alfredo Quarto is executive director of the Mangrove Action Project. He was recently asked the role mangroves can have in mitigating the effects of climate change. "Mangroves typify the important role that coastal wetlands play in protecting coastlines from erosion and natural disasters such as hurricanes and tsunamis. Our coasts are more vulnerable now to these natural disasters, whether they be from hurricanes, tsunamis or wave surges because of the loss of natural coastal barriers, such as mangroves, sea grasses, corals, salt marshes or other coastal wetlands. Even sand dunes play an important part in acting as natural barriers against the occasional, but devastating ravages of Nature. Mangroves are especially important today in reducing the adverse effects from climate change, because they sequester more carbon dioxide and store more carbon than any other plant species. Conserving and restoring our coastal wetlands will not stop climate change, but will help lessen the adverse impacts that we now expect. We still need to reduce our CO2 emissions and commit ourselves duly to this urgent, life-saving need. READ MORE
 
ASIA
 
Typhoon Haiyan and beyond: the role of trees and forests in rebuilding communities
40215-05f5d78e0858b5159a77b5714ec41e01 
PHILIPPINES - In early November of last year, Typhoon Haiyan ripped across the central Philippines with wind speeds exceeding 300 kilometres per hour – the strongest ever recorded in a storm making landfall. The storm killed more than 7000 people and left millions homeless. Patrick had previously lived and worked in the Philippines for many years and since the typhoon has made several trips to the country, helping to assess the impacts of the storm on tree- and forest-dependent people, and make proposals on how forests and trees should contribute to FAO and partner efforts to rebuild shattered lives and strengthen communities’ resilience against future disasters. With strong support from colleagues at the regional office in Bangkok as well as FAO Forestry colleagues at Headquarters, and even from retired forestry colleagues, advice was provided on approaches and techniques for salvaging millions of downed coconut trees to produce coco lumber for rebuilding houses and community buildings. This also included proposals on the legal and appropriate options for using wood for building boats, which local people rely on for fishing and public transport. This was an important aspect as wood is a major link in the social and economic ties that bind the livelihoods of the forest and fisheries communities; without it people would be pushed further into poverty. READ MORE
 
1,471 hectares of mangroves notified as ‘reserve forests’
INDIA -  Around 1,471 hectares of mangroves on government land in Navi Mumbai have been notified as “reserved forests”. This comes nearly nine months after the state’s decision to notify all mangroves on public land in the state as “reserved forests”. “With this notification, only around 4,478 hectares in Dahanu division of Thane district are left to be notified as “reserved forests”,” said N Vasudevan, chief conservator of forests, mangrove cell. These mangroves in Navi Mumbai were notified as “protected forests” in 2008 as per a 2005 High Court directive to map and notify mangroves.  While limited human activity is permitted in “protected forest” areas, once a forest settlement officer settles claims of all inhabitants in “reserved forests”, all human activity is strictly prohibited. READ MORE
 
Act now to save our seas
THAILAND - For decades, local fisherfolk and environmentalists have been trying in vain to stop destructive fishing by commercial trawlers from annihilating the country’s coastal seas. Now they are pinning their hopes on market forces to save the country’s once abundant seas from the menaces of big trawlers and the fish meal industry. Their campaigns are banking on the increasing external pressure from the European Union and the United States on the seafood and fish meal industries to clean up their acts — or face a trade boycott. It is common knowledge that commercial trawlers have long been using environmentally destructive fishing methods which destroy the seabed and fish stocks in the Gulf of Thailand and along the coasts of of the Andaman Sea. By using finely meshed nets to catch fish, trawlers scoop up baby and trash fish along with other marine life in one go. The seabeds, which are nurseries and home to marine lives, are also destroyed, leading to a rapid decline in marine fertility. READ MORE
 
Mangrove reforestation highlighted International Women's Day celebration
PHILIPPINES - More than 1,000  propagules were planted at the mangrove reforestation site located at Baragay Pikinit, in the coastal town of Sultan Naga Dimaporo (SND), this province, on March 7, 2014. This is in celebration of the International Women’s Day (IWD) set on March 8. “Instead of the usual song and dance gathering of the different women groups, this year we opted to shift the focus towards environmental protection and preservation because this is something that we – the women sector feel strongly about”, explained Provincial Population Officer Ananette Daniel. The activity was organized by the Provincial Gender and Development (PGAD) Committee which is chaired by Governor Khalid Dimaporo. More than 1,000 participants, joined  the event composed of provincial and municipal government employees, provincial board members, AFP personnel, police officers, women organizations, local cooperatives and  barangay officials. READ MORE
 
Forest heroine puts law to work in defense of forests
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PHILIPPINES - After her father — a well-respected prosecutor — was shot on the steps of the justice hall in Puerto Princesa, the capital of the northern Philippines province of Palawan, Gerthie made it her business to extend justice to more people. She earned a law degree, then turned her focus toward environmental and social justice in Palawan, a heavily forested archipelago designated a UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) biosphere reserve in 1990. She worked to protect the rights of indigenous peoples, building her own environmental defense unit called the Environmental Legal Assistance Center (ELAC), where she is now executive director. Gerthie’s energetic spirit and commitment galvanized many communities to protect forests, both upland and coastal, through the creation of citizen watchdogs, forest guardians and multisectoral advocacy networks. They stopped mining in almost 200,000 hectares of forest in Palawan; secured the passage of village and municipal watershed ordinances; and supported the establishment of mangrove sanctuaries to the cessation of mining activities in forest areas. READ MORE
 
AMERICAS
 
Top judge warns against permits for Bimini developer
mangrovegw-a 
BAHAMAS - One of the country's top judges has warned of implications for the rule of law if the controversial Bimini Bay development is allowed to forge ahead while still subject to judicial challenge. Court of Appeal Justice Abdulai Conteh told lawyers for the government and Resorts World Bimini that any construction at the resort site could put the entire case at risk. "In a democracy, no self-respecting government would do anything to jeopardize proceedings before the court," he said. "When there is a contested issue, one should not change the facts on the ground until a decision is made." Justice Conteh's comments came as the appeal, lodged by environmental groups Bimini Blue Coalition and Save The Bays, was again adjourned - this time to June 2. When the new date was announced, lead lawyer for the environmentalists Fred Smith, QC, expressed concern that construction would be allowed to advance in the meantime. "Development continues, dredging continues," the Callenders & Co attorney and partner said. READ MORE
 
Editor’s Note – Regardless of where you stand on the concept of Environmental Markets, your input is needed during this upcoming event.
International Forum on Payments for Environmental Services of Tropical Forests
COSTA RICA – Ensuring sustainable supply of goods and services from forests to enhance their vital contributions to socio-economic development lies at the core of Sustainable Forest Management (SFM). Yet, SFM in the tropics is often less profitable than other land-uses because many of the goods and services forests produce lack formal markets.  Payments for forest environmental (or ecosystem) services such as biodiversity, tourism and recreation, water conservation, soil protection and climate change mitigation, known in general as PES, is one such innovative means of financing SFM. The International Forum on Payments for Environmental Services of Tropical Forests aims to highlight the importance of developing and implementing PES mechanisms in tropical countries and to share best practices and lessons learned. The Forum is expected to recommend actions at local, national and international levels for the development and effective implementation of PES mechanisms in support of SFM in the tropics. It will bring together policymakers, researchers and academicians, practitioners, civil society, the private sector, and regional and international organizations engaged in the development, implementation and support of of PES mechanisms. READ MORE
 
EUROPE
 
The world must invest in mangroves
375221 
U.K. – As the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) prepares to launch its latest climate report, Mark Spalding reports that mangrove swamps don't just protect coastlines from storms, flooding and erosion - they also sequester huge tonnages of carbon. And that makes them a super-smart investment. “My colleagues and I have worked out how much carbon there is in the world's mangrove forests, give or take a bit,” says Spalding. “And we mapped it. And here's why these findings are tremendously important. They quantify what some of us in marine conservation have been saying for a decade or more: that mangrove forests are among the most carbon rich habitats on the planet; and that, although they occupy just a fraction of the world's surface, they pack a punch. Anyone concerned about preserving nature's value - carbon sequestration and all the other benefits mangroves provide us - needs to think hard about this. There's no magic cure to the challenges of global change - warming, rising seas, worsening storms and ocean acidification - we'll only ever get there through a combination of interventions. Mangroves aren't sufficiently widespread to tip the scales, but they give a greater return on investment than many other mitigation efforts.” READ MORE
 
Cities on frontline of climate change struggle
U.K. - Half of the world's population now lives in cities, and this proportion is set to rise to two-thirds by 2050. Yet cities are particularly vulnerable to the worst impacts of climate change precisely because their locations are fixed. The latest report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) re-emphasises the vital role cities can play in cutting greenhouse gas emissions. This should come as no surprise, since urban centres are responsible for three quarters of global energy consumption and for 80% of greenhouse gas emissions. "In a sense, they are the carbon criminals of this world, but they also provide us with really good opportunities," says Dr Tim Wilson from the University of Reading, UK.  "We've probably focused quite a lot on mitigation in the past, but if climate change is accelerating, which many scientists say it is, there's a strong case for looking at adaptation more," says Dr Wilson. Not every city need respond in the same way to take effective adaptation steps. Coastal urban areas in the tropics could, for example, seed and protect dunes and reforest mangroves to provide protection against future sea level rise. David Dodman, an expert on climate change and urbanisation, uses the term "soft engineering" for such adaptive measures: "It's not quarrying millions of tonnes of concrete to turn into a sea barrier, but more about working with the natural environment," he says. READ MORE

LAST WORD
 

In Haiyan's aftermath, the mangroves of leyte-eastern samar need protection, not planting
 
Above is the title of the commentary on which the Inquirer news article by Nestor Burgos below was based, together with an earlier Call to Action issued 22 March 2014 by the workshop on “Mapping Yolanda’s Impact on Philippine Mangroves: Impacts and Recovery.”  Two additional items must be stressed:
 
First, the 28,000 hectares (12% of total) Philippine mangroves 'likely affected' used published literature (based on satellite imagery of Philippine mangroves) to estimate probable area -- with the key word likely. Precisely why this eye-in-the-sky approach had to be validated by feet on the ground during surveys referred to in the article that we made in January and March of this year.
 
Secondly, our findings of partial to minimal to no damage at all from Typhoon Yolanda to the E. Samar-Leyte mangroves is not new. According to Eric Buduan of the Philippine Tropical Forest Conservation Foundation: "In October 1998, Supertyphoon Ilyang with maximum wind strength of 240 kph and gusts of 250 kph, hit coastal Isabela (Northern Sierra Madre Natural Park). The mangroves were significantly damaged, however, there was no cleaning or human intervention undertaken. The mangroves just regenerated naturally, as long as these were protected from human destruction."
 
After all, mangroves (and beach forests) are Nature's coastal bioshields, therefore damage and subsequent (natural) recovery are par for their course.
 
Jurgenne Primavera
 
~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS - If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com

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Please cut and paste these news alerts/ action alerts on to your own lists and contacts. Help us spread the word and further generate letters of concern, as this can make a big difference in helping to halt a wrongdoing or encourage correct action.

 

Mangrove Action Project

MAP INTRODUCES CROWDRISE FUNDING

MAP supporters now have an easy way to spread awareness and support for Mangove Action Porject's Community Based Mangrove Ecological Restoration Program.

More people are realizing the importance of mangrove forests, yet these habitats are still disappearing at an astonishing rate. Support us in helping prevent mangrove loss, and accelerate successful mangrove restoration around the world. You can find out more about us and mangroves on our website and find out by clicking here why investing in mangroves now is good for everyone's future.

This latest video was produced as part of a fundraiser campaign for The Mangrove Action Project to help raise funds and awareness for a particular method of mangrove restoration called Community Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration.

We invite you to share this video with friends, families and colleague who want to do their part in promoting a greener environment!



Friday, March 28, 2014

MAP News Issue 335 - March 29, 2014

VerticalResponse

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

The MAP News
335th Edition                                March 29, 2014

Action Alerts:

2015 Children’s Art Calendar Competition - Mangrove Action Project wants you to join us as we celebrate our upcoming 22nd Anniversary of MAP’s ongoing efforts to conserve and restore the world’s mangrove forest wetlands. Again, this year we commemorate those efforts via our inspiring children’s art in MAP’s 14th annual Children’s Mangrove Art Contest for the 2015 Calendar year. READ MORE
Volunteer Needed for Mangrove Ecosystem Monitoring Program READ MORE
 
Safeway CEO: Label your GMO foods SIGN THE PETITION
 
Your support is needed: Cameroon activists on trial for peaceful
protest against Wall Street land grabber READ MORE
MAP VOLUNTEERS NEEDED IN THAILAND VIEW REQUIREMENTS

Order your 2014 Calendar
2014cld-300x225 
 
Save the Sundarbans from Rampal power plant – View Sample Letter to Minister
Sign the Petition
 
Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition
Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier
Donate.jpg
It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result.
 
—Mahatma Gandhi


Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE


 
URGENT - VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

MAP’s VOLUNTEER INTERNS HELP MAP MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE
READ MORE

 


MANGROVE ISSUES 

View New Videos posted by MAP Asia intern, Delphine. CLICK HERE
 
The importance of restoring mangroves in an effective, long-term manner. Mangrove video - VIEW

Please view our new video for our Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign! It is now on our website under the Question Your Shrimp section heading. WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video
Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE” Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT THESE SIGHTS
SLIDE SHOW
    VIMEO SHOW

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine -
Read More
 


"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog

Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin

LISTEN TO INTERVIEW


Join MAP on Facebook


Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp


Donate.jpg


Not yet a MAP News subscriber?
Click here to subscribe.



Note to Our Readers:
We strive to keep active links in our newsletter. However, due to circumstances beyond our control,
occasionally links to stories may become broken. If you find a link to a story is not functioning, please cut and paste the headline into your browser search bar. In most cases you should be able to locate the original story.




Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:

Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games

Visit the Mangrove Action Project recycle website Click on the recycle button then click on the Download Shipping Label, and follow the instructions.

 

download_shipping_label





 

FEATURED STORY
Facing Rising Seas, Bangladesh Confronts the Consequences of Climate Change
27bangladesh-lede-jumbo 
BANGLADESH - “There are a lot of places in the world at risk from rising sea levels, but Bangladesh is at the top of everybody’s list,” said Rafael Reuveny, a professor in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University at Bloomington. “And the world is not ready to cope with the problems.” The effects of climate change have led to a growing sense of outrage in developing nations, many of which have contributed little to the pollution that is linked to rising temperatures and sea levels but will suffer the most from the consequences. In an analysis of decades of tidal records published in October, Dr. Pethick found that high tides in Bangladesh were rising 10 times faster than the global average. He predicted that seas in Bangladesh could rise as much as 13 feet by 2100, four times the global average. In an area where land is often a thin brown line between sky and river — nearly a quarter of Bangladesh is less than seven feet above sea level — such an increase would have dire consequences, Dr. Pethick said. READ MORE
 
AFRICA
 
Campaign Update—Cameroon: Herakles Farms Ordered to Pay $4.8 Million in Racial Discrimination Compensation
herakles_cameroon_may_2011caada.jpg?itok=HiC_pujx 
CAMEROON - A Cameroonian judge in the Fako High Court has awarded former Herakles Farm employee Loxly Massango Epie 2.3 billion CFA (4.8 million USD) in a lawsuit claiming racial discrimination and wrongful termination of his contract of employment against the US-based palm oil company Herakles Farms. Herakles Farms, which is affiliated with the massive Herakles Capital, was granted 20,000 hectares of the 73,000 hectares of forest it requested from the Cameroon government in November 2013 to convert into oil palm plantations. The company has faced strong criticism nationally and internationally for the harmful effect it will have on the forest, wildlife, and nearby population and also for the deceitful ways in which they have obtained the land. READ MORE
 
Forced Relocation of Sengwer People proves urgency of canceling REDD
KENYA - We, the No REDD in Africa Network (NRAN) together with the Sengwer Indigenous Peoples Programme and the undersigned 66 organizations and over 300 individuals, strongly condemn the massive evictions and forced relocation of the Sengwer Indigenous People, one of the few remaining hunter-gatherers of the world, from their ancestral home in Kenya’s Cherangany Hills. The Kenyan government calls the Sengwer People ‘squatters and or Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs),’ despite the fact that they and their ancestors have lived in the Cherangany Hills since time immemorial; and that Article (63d) of the Kenyan constitution (2010) grants them inalienable rights to their ancestral lands. Sengwer spokesman Yator Kiptum denounced the “disaster” carried out by a combined force of the Kenya Forest Service (KFS) and Administration Police, a paramilitary unit of the police, now evicting the Sengwer, destroying property and burning homes[i]. “The government of Kenya is forcing us into extinction," he said.[ii] According to international human rights law such as the Convention on Genocide, forced relocation of ethnic or racial minorities is a very grave violation and can constitute genocide. READ MORE
 
ASIA
 
Rehabilitating Mangroves in the Philippines
Mangroves-in-the-Philippines.jpg?itok=j-P4V5JS 
PHILIPPINES - Zoological Society of London (ZSL) started its mangrove rehabilitation work in 2007 through the Community-based Mangrove Rehabilitation Project (CMRP), with the aim of increasing coastal protection, food resources and diversifying livelihood options. This was achieved through empowering local communities to protect remaining mangrove forests and developing science-based methods for communities to rehabilitate lost forest sites. Over a four year period, close to 100,000 mangroves were planted, with the rehabilitation of 107.8 hectares of mangrove forest well underway. This project resulted in manuals that provide detailed biological and socioeconomic guidance on community-based mangrove rehabilitation and on fishpond reversion to mangroves. READ MORE
 
International workshop on Deforestation Drivers and the Rights of Forest Peoples
INDONESIA - An international workshop organised by Forest Peoples Programme and Pusaka brought together forest peoples, governments, NGOs, international agencies and forest scientists from Africa, Southeast Asia and Latin America on 9 -14 March 2014 in Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. The aim of the workshop was to share lessons and generate recommendations on effective measures to stem deforestation, promote human rights and secure local livelihoods. Workshop participants reviewed the findings of five country case studies and four thematic papers on deforestation drivers and forest peoples’ rights from Peru, Colombia, Paraguay, Guyana, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Liberia, Indonesia and Malaysia. READ MORE
 
Marine Survey on an Island Paradise – a MAP intern’s personal experience
Elena+ 
THAILAND - My name is Elena Horas and I come from Spain.  I have been working as an intern with MAP at their office in Trang, Thailand for about 3 months. It seems like it was yesterday when I first arrived and now my time here is coming to an end. Without a doubt one of the best experiences I have had was travelling to Koh Phra Thong (koh means island in Thai) and assisting Barry, one of MAP advisors, with his two research monitoring projects. Because I spent more than a week on the island, I was able to explore it and take part in different activities. Arriving to the island was a very amazing experience itself. We had to sail through the mangroves to get to it and it was the first time I was on a boat driving so close to such beautiful ecosystem. The stunning scenery really blew my mind. READ MORE
 
Mangrove experts urge restoration, regeneration of organic coasts
When Ulva Takke heard that a foreign-owned firm planned to set up an iron ore mine on the tiny island of Bangka in the province of North Sulawesi, she joined forces with other residents in a protest that went all the way to Indonesia’s supreme court. Takke owns a scuba-diving business on the 4,800-hectare (ha) island, which is populated by fewer than 3,000 people and supports a small tourism industry, as well as fishing, aquaculture and agriculture. Although the community won its appeal against the mining project, news reports indicate that the company is still preparing to begin work, a move that could put pristine habitats at risk, including lowland tropical rainforest, mangroves, freshwater sago swamp and coral reefs. “If so, it’s going to be a big disaster,” Takke said. “Livelihoods of traditional fishermen and coconut harvesters will be destroyed and many people will be displaced.” READ MORE
 
AMERICAS
 
Hydroelectric project a threat to mangroves
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MEXICO - Environmentalists and community groups reported that a hydroelectric project in the state of Nayarit, western Mexico, threatens "the largest mangrove forest in the Mexican Pacific" of the National Wetlands Ecological Reserve, a system of mangroves. The proposed hydroelectric project in Las Cruces envisages construction of a dam on the San Pedro River basin Mezquital, with an investment of 7.995 million pesos (US$602 million) and capacity of 790 gigawatts per year. READ MORE
 
Shrimpers issue death threats against artisanal fishermen
BRAZIL - Shrimpers have tried to destroy the mangrove area of traditional fishing community in Encarnação Salinas , Bahia , Brazil, and have resorted to death threats to local leaders to achieve their goals. These actions have been denounced by Redmanglar , Ecocéanos , Rain Forest and numerous other organizations in Latin America. "This action represents an environmental and social crime to the ancient fishing villages and Salinas Encarnação living within mangrove ecosystem and is an example and a expression of environmental racism that exists in Brazil", reported Carlos Salvatierra , Executive Secretary of International Redmanglar. Salvatierra went on to say that shrimp tractors have been brought in to destroy the mangroves near the place known as Igreja da Praia and Santa Luzia "despite having a warning from Instituto do Meido Environment and Water Resources ( INEMA )" he said. "We make the public aware that now several leaders and local leaders have been threatened with death for defending their traditional fishing territory" says the complaint. READ MORE en Espanol
 
Editor’s Note : Click the READ MORE link to see the full text of presentation by Gail Woon, Founder of EARTHCARE to Information Session at Bimini Big Game Club Resort & Marina, Alicetown, Bimini on March 15th, 2014.
EARTHCARE speaks on impacts of the Resorts World Bimini cruise ship terminal
cruiset3-a 
BAHAMAS – The cruise ship terminal for Resorts World Bimini has been described as “necessary” to the business plan. I will outline here several reasons why that is a ludicrous statement. The MAIN reason this delicate site was chosen, and the only reason that this incredibly valuable biologically diverse site was chosen for destruction is simply because it is closest to the casino and to the main road of Resorts World Bimini. Since the start of the Bimini Bay Resort in the 90s, it has gone through much scrutiny and controversy. However, in spite of the controversy, Mr. Capo has been allowed to destroy over 160+ acres of healthy mangrove wetlands area. In addition to the mangrove annihilation, Mr. Capo was allowed to and is still dredging cheap (free) fill from the ocean bottom in the North Sound. The 220,000 cubic yards of ocean bottom that will be removed from the endangered reef habitat is simply, so that they do not have to truck fill. READ MORE
 
Research shows significant effects of Bimini development
BAHAMAS - Research from a long-term study reveals that the year mega-resort construction in Bimini deforested almost half of a lagoon’s mangrove shorelines, the survival rate of newborn lemon sharks plummeted to only 26%. The startling statistic was revealed during a presentation on the closing day of last week’s Bahamas Natural History Conference in Nassau. READ MORE
 
Editor’s Note: There is no evidence that these WWF/ASC newly crafted shrimp standards will work to reduce the pressing issues of mangrove loss and human rights abuses associated with the ongoing expansion of the shrimp aquaculture industry, As long as these standards promote open, throughput systems of production, they will fail to meet the stated objectives of sustainable shrimp production. And, these standards will not meet the needs of the majority of local stakeholders who will suffer from further environmental degradation causing worsening food insecurity for the sake of ensuring that this luxury shrimp product can be sold in the wealthier nations.
ACS shrimp standards finalized
USA - The Shrimp Aquaculture Dialogue has handed over the shrimp standard to the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC), following seven years of development. Now the standard is finalized, this marks a major milestone for the ASC and a step towards promoting more responsible shrimp aquaculture. “I have to applaud the individuals on the dialogue — around 400 people worked tirelessly, including NGOs, industry, scientists and others,” said Chris Ninnes, ASC CEO. READ MORE
 
EUROPE
 
Editor’s Note: The following article reinforces what our Conscientious Objectors alliance has been promoting for years: Get the Shrimp Ponds out of the Intertidal zone, and conserve this vital zone free from such wasteful and short-sighted human incursions.
Wetlands International works with businesses and the Government to introduce certification of sustainable shrimp farms.
NETHERLANDS - The main driver of the loss of mangrove forests in the world is their conversion for aquaculture projects, particularly shrimp farms. It was estimated that by the year 2000, over 1.2 million ha of mangroves had been converted into aquaculture ponds in Southeast Asia alone (Kairo et al. 2001). To worsen the situation, farm owners, as a general practice, abandon their shrimp ponds when they are too polluted (as the result of unsustainable use of fungicides, pesticides or antibiotics) for further production. These abandoned shrimp ponds unquestionably possess a threat to local populations’ health and make the coastal areas vulnerable to strong winds, tidal floods, salt water intrusion and abrasion. To reverse and prevent the recurring of abandoned shrimp aquacultures, we advocate for the promotion of sustainable aquaculture production in key mangrove countries such as Indonesia and Thailand. Specifically, we promote the silvofishery and poly-aquaculture approaches which combine the replanting of mangroves near and inside shrimp and fishponds. These approaches not only reduce the vulnerability of coastal areas to strong winds, tidal floods, abrasion and salt water intrusion, but also enhance the biodiversity of the region. READ MORE

LAST WORD
 

Dear friends and colleagues,
 
Together with La Via Campesina, Focus on the Global South and Friends of the Earth International we are launching the below initiative and would like to invite those interested to endorse the letter. Please feel free to distribute the letter as you wish. We will be posting shortly on our website (www.wrm.org.uy) the Spanish, French and Portuguese versions. READ LETTER
 
 
Best wishes,
Teresa Perez
 
~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS - If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com

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Mangrove Action Project

Mangrove Action Project-2015 Children’s Art Calendar Competition



 Mangrove Action Project wants you to join us as we celebrate our upcoming 22nd Anniversary of MAP’s ongoing efforts to conserve and restore the world’s mangrove forest wetlands.

 Again, this year we commemorate those efforts via our inspiring children’s art in MAP’s 14th annual Children’s Mangrove Art Contest for the 2015 Calendar year. Let us all use this next calendar competition as an inspiration for both students and teachers to “set the date” to conserve and restore our planet’s mangroves, and thus combat declining wild fisheries, coastal erosion and climate change. Mangroves are one of our planet’s best defenses against global warming and rising sea levels! 

 Annually, MAP invites teachers and their students from around the globe to participate in an international art contest. They learn through their participation about the incredible beauty and biodiversity of the mangroves and the students’ attempts to depict through their art what they have experienced on field trips to mangroves and in classroom studies. 

 Children from 13 nations entered our contest last year by answering a simple, but intriguing question: “What do the mangroves mean to my community and myself?” As usual, it was difficult to choose from among the beautifully crafted works of children’s art. Around 2500 children participated from a multitude of schools located in 13 mangrove nations. 

 Through the publication and distribution of these beautiful calendars, MAP recognizes the great accomplishments of these young artists. We wish to thank each child, their teachers and the associate non-governmental organizations that participated and promoted the project in schools during 2014. Their good work and dedicated efforts have helped produce yet another attractive calendar for yet another Mangrove Year! 

Thank You For Your Past Support!  Please Join Us Again For Our 2015 Calendar Competition! 

For the Mangroves And the Mangrove Communities!



Alfredo Quarto, Executive Director 
Mangrove Action Project 
mangroveap@olympus.net

Marine Survey on an Island Paradise – a MAP intern’s personal experience




My name is Elena Horas and I come from Spain.  I have been working as an intern with MAP at their office in Trang, Thailand for about 3 months. It seems like it was yesterday when I first arrived and now my time here is coming to an end. Without a doubt one of the best experiences I have had was travelling to Koh Phra Thong (koh means island in Thai) and assisting Barry, one of MAP advisors, with his two research monitoring projects. Because I spent more than a week on the island, I was able to explore it and take part in different activities. 

Arriving to the island was a very amazing experience itself. We had to sail through the mangroves to get to it and it was the first time I was on a boat driving so close to such beautiful ecosystem. The stunning scenery really blew my mind. Once the boat arrived in Tha Paeyoi village, we came across the first adventurous situation, as Barry and I were unlucky enough to have a flat tire while driving to the village we were staying in, Ban Lions. Although it was very hot and I was quite hungry, the experience of having to carefully drive back to Tha Paeyoi where we spent around one hour waiting for someone to pick us up was nevertheless entertaining. When we finally arrived in Ban Lions we quickly made our way to the homestay place where food was going to be served every day and enjoyed an amazing lunch. I have to say that food is one of my best memories of the island, it was absolutely delicious. PaNee, the Thai lady who cooked for us, had always something new on the table and something surprisingly tastier every day. Thus, the rest of the day went by fairly quick as we didn’t have any work planned. It was only the next day when I would start helping Barry with his two monitoring projects. 


When my second day on the island approached I was quite excited about seeing and learning what Barry’s research work involved. That same night was also the celebration of the Chinese New Year and we had plans to go down to one of the resorts for dinner and celebrate with a few people which I was as well looking forward to. Because we had to wait until the afternoon for the tide to go down and be able to start the monitoring, I spent the morning walking around the village and exploring it a little. Ban Lions was a very small village full of newly built houses. However, it was almost completely uninhabited which really surprised me. By reading street signs and talking to Barry I learnt that these beautiful new houses were only built two years after the 2004 tsunami devastated the old village. In the meantime, most families that survived had to leave the village and look for livelihoods elsewhere. By the time the whole village was reconstructed, only about three families actually returned to their new homes, leaving the village as a current ghost town. 
In the afternoon we made our way to the site where the monitoring was taking place and started the work. We carried out the field work for a study involving the effects of Marine protected Areas (MPA) on ecologically and economically important invertebrates. As a Marine Biologist, I really loved this practical work as I discovered a lot of interesting marine species that I didn’t know about before. Conchs, sea stars, crabs, shrimps, snails, sea slugs and sea cucumbers were some of the creatures that we monitored. 
I spent most of the week helping Barry with the same monitoring project in two different sites and although it involved a lot of hard work (long walks through the mud, barefoot and in the dark) I learnt a lot about tropical marine species and I very much enjoyed it.



Landscape observed from sites where monitoring processes were carried out

The last two days I was on the island were a bit more interesting as some volunteers from Naucrates, the turtle conservation project, arrived and Barry and I finished the invertebrates monitoring and started the seagrass one, which meant a change from the routine we had been doing the whole week. The seagrass monitoring was also very interesting and enjoyable. It was easier to carry out and took less time which was also quite nice. Moreover, I spent the last few days cycling around the island to get to the beach and enjoying a bit of sea and sand. I also joined the volunteers in a kayaking trip around two small and beautiful islands just opposite Koh Phra Thong. The small islands were like small beach paradises where you could also go snorkeling just to find lots of different stunning corals and fish species.
In general, my visit to Koh Phra Thong was an amazing experience and definitely one of the highlights of my time in Thailand.

Elena Horas, MAP Volunteer Intern, E-mail: volunteer.mapasia@gmail.com