Saturday, August 1, 2020

MAP CELEBRATES ITS 500th Edition of MAP NEWS (Formerly Late Friday News)

An extension of the MAP Quartlerly Newsletter (a hand addressed snail-mailed paper product of the last century), MAP's electronic version, The Late Friday News, marks it's 500th issue with this post. Starting in 2000, the Newsletter has faithfully gone out to MAP News subscribers around the world every other week. To celebrate the 500th issue, we take a look at some of the tremendous growth and progress Mangrove conservation and restoration have seen.


When MAP was founded in 1992, the goal was to bring awareness to global need to protect tropical coastal forests for protection against cyclones, the benefit of global fisheries, coral reef health and the continuation of thousands of years of traditional livelihoods. Today, some 28 years after MAPs founding, the awareness of the importance of mangrove ecosystems is well recognized on a global scale.

But they still remain under serious threat.

Alfredo Quarto shedding some light on the plight of mangroves in 2001
While governments and Big Agriculture/Aquaculture may acknowledge the vital role mangrove forests play in global health, many areas of these forests continue to be destroyed in the name of progress. Housing developments, transportation lines, oil and gas lines, shrimp farms, and palm oil plantations all continue to lay waste to vast tracts of mangrove forests. 

We will continue to bring these stories to light, in hopes that our collective efforts will one day lead us to declare "mission accomplished".
...

THREAT #1 - SHRIMP FARMING
Globally, shrimp farming has been the largest threat to mangrove forests. And while terms like "sustainable" and "eco-friendly" are plastered on bags of farmed shrimp products, this industry continues its assault on forests. 16 years ago, (Issue #141 July of 2004), MAP News reported on Ecuador's efforts to stop destruction and to restore mangroves "incarcerated" by shrimp farming...
Freedom for the mangroves is a symbolic name that urges to "liberate" the mangroves that are illegally destroyed and suffocated by the dams of the shrimp ponds that forbid the natural exchange of brackish and fresh waters.
Freedom for the mangroves jailed by industrial shrimp infrastructure that bans their normal development and exchange of energy, and finally
Freedom for the areas that have been destroyed and need to be reestablished to their original ecosystem.
Under the slogan "Freedom for the Mangroves", this year 2004's campaign that commemorates the 26th of July, is committed to strengthen the local organizational processes and to generate favorable public opinion for the defense and community management of the mangroves.

And yet, to this day, Ecuador continues to struggle for their forests - in last year's Issue #460 we were still covering the industries devastation of mangroves in Ecuador


In Ecuador, home to the tallest mangrove trees in the world (forty meters), Dr. Stuart Hamilton of Salisbury University studies the ecological and sociological impacts of mangrove decline. His work emphasizes the impact of shrimp aquaculture, an industry that has exploded in Ecuador over the last forty years. After clearing mangrove forests, farmers cultivate shrimp in large pits dug into the sediment. The pits are crowded and subject to disease, so the farmers infuse them with antibiotics and pesticides. When they become too toxic and diseased to be viable, farmers clear more mangroves and dig more pits, leaving thousands of acres of abandoned, toxic shrimp pits behind them. Ecuador is the second-largest supplier of shrimp to the United States. READ MORE

....

THREAT #2 - PALM OIL PLANTATIONS
More recently, as the demand for palm oil has increased, a newer threat has emerged. Mono-cultured forests of palm oil trees are replacing naturally occurring mangroves at an alarming rate. As early as 2012 MAP News (Issue 299) reported on fishermans' concerns about the restoration of these impacted areas.

North Sumatra Fishermen See Mangroves in Their Future
INDONESIA - Fishermen in North Sumatra’s Langkat district have begun replanting mangroves on 1,200 hectares of coastal land previously cleared for oil palm plantations. Activists from the Indonesian Traditional Fishermen’s Association (KNTI) and the Fisheries Justice Coalition (Kiara) said at a press conference in Jakarta on Sunday that they hoped to restore the mangrove ecosystem in Pangkalan Berandan subdistrict and possibly set aside 300 hectares as a conservation area. Tajuruddin Hasibuan, head of the KNTI’s Sumatra chapter, said fishermen in seven villages in the area were involved in the initiative. “When you consider how important the mangrove ecosystem is to the traditional fishermen, you need to consistently fight against the expansion of oil palm plantations in the area,” he said. “We realize that what we’re doing is just the start, and that there are other areas where plantations are expanding and mangrove swamps are deteriorating.” READ MORE

And in Issue #500 we are still reporting the catastrophic effect these industrial monocultures are wreaking on tropical coastal forests.

Meet Indonesia’s carbon guardian
INDONESIA - Indonesia’s mangroves are an incredibly effective tool against climate change — but they’re being cut down to grow shrimp and palm oil for you. Large-scale palm oil production is one of the biggest drivers of deforestation in Indonesia; tens of millions of acres of primary rainforest, peatlands, and coastal lowlands have been cleared to grow the oil-rich fruit for fuel, food, and household products for consumers around the world. Palm oil was also responsible for most of the fierce fires that burned more than 2,500 square miles in Indonesia this year; some 80 percent of the fires were set to clear land for the crop, officials told the New York Times. Unless the country can dramatically slow down mangrove destruction, one of Indonesia’s best climate assets will end up only accelerating the emergency. If you chop down a mangrove tree, the exposed soil beneath becomes a big climate problem. When trees are removed, and the blue carbon beneath is exposed to air, the carbon reacts with oxygen to produce carbon dioxide and methane, two greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. A Scientific Reports study looking at mangroves in Thailand found that 70 percent of their carbon is lost when mangroves are converted to shrimp ponds. READ MORE

....

THREAT #3 - OIL PIPELINES
In October 2001 MAP spread news of a large crude oil spill along the Escravos-Warri crude oil pipeline. Crude oil pumped from Escravos to Warri for about four days did not get to Warri. This huge quantity of crude oil was spilled into the creeks down to the sea. The result was a massive destruction of aquatic life and fauna and the accompanying human misery.

"Apart from this regular oil spill crises, we also suffer resultant effect from gas flaring . We had two forests reserves: Otumara and Uremure. Now both have been totally lost to oil spill and dredging of canal to flow stations. Our sacred forest has also been violated; Abura trees used for making furniture have been destroyed over the years. Lack of health facility in this area is a big problem."
---Eghare (Chief) Wellington Ojogor (Ugborodu Community)
"Chairman Council of Elders and a Seasoned Surveyor".
SOURCE - MAP NEWS ISSUE 88, Oct. 15, 2001

19 years later MAP is still covering the same story MAP News Issue #498 July 4, 2020

The Toxic Legacy of 60 Years of Abundant Oil

NIGERIA - It’s one of the most polluted spots on Earth, and prospects of a turnaround only get worse as Covid-19 guts a global industry. In the past decade, crude has gone from providing about 80% of all Nigerian state revenue to about 50% last year. This year, with the global economy hit by the coronavirus adding to existing trends as the world shifts away from fossil fuels, the government projects an 80% decline in oil income. That creates a bitter reality for residents at the center of Africa’s biggest petroleum industry: they’ll have little help cleaning up pollution that’s deprived entire communities in the Niger River delta of their fishing and farming livelihoods. “Over so many years both the government and the oil companies have made promises to clean up without doing so,” said Pius Waritimi, an art teacher and environmental activist based in the southern oil hub of Port Harcourt.

THREAT #4 - MURDER
MAP has always been at the front lines of the environmental battle, and it is indeed a battle of life and death. In a 2014 story Dying to Change the World - MAP news reported “In the past decade, close to 1,000 such activists in 35 countries were murdered, according to a report published in April 2014 by Global Witness” and again in Dec 2017 Issue 431 we quoted the 2017 Global Witness' Report on Killings of Environmental and Land Defenders : 

“In just more than a year under the current administration of President Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines, at least 42 environmental defenders have been killed. - MAP News Issue #431
 
Sadly, the number of murders is not declining as conflicts continue between those who want to destroy natural baundance of the mangroves, and those willing to stand up to stop it.

Here are just a few of the names of these dedicated people we have remembered over the years in MAP News
Phulbari Activists Amin, Salekin and Tariqul (died 2006) - Issue 476

Honduran activist Berta Cáceres – Issue #386

Remembering Thailand Shrimp Farm Activist Jurin Rachapol (died 2001) – Issue #383

Thailand Activist Prajob Nao-opas – Issue #309

Remembering Jeannette Kawas (Died 1995) – Issue 383

Guatemalan Activist Julio Lopez – Issue 369

Columbia's Jeferson David Tejada – Issue 350

Costa Rica's Jairo Mora Sandoval - Issue 316

Thailand's Charoen Wat-aksorn – Issue 141

Remembering Nigeria’s Ken Saro-Wiwa (Died 1994) - Issue #102
 
Korunamoyee Sardar - Issue # 91 
 
NOW FOR A  BETTER WORLD
But it is not all doom and gloom on the Mangrove front. Great strides have been made in the science and technology of mangrove technology over the past 2 decades. 
...
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES
We are proud to say that the first generation of children raised on our Marvellous Mangrove School Curriculum are now full grown adults. Under the leadership of MAP Education Director Martin Keeley of Cayman Islands, Children around the World have been raised understanding the awareness of the critical habitats.


...

CHILDREN'S ART MANGROVE CALENDAR
Like the Marvellous Mangrove Curriculum, we now have a grown, active network of adults who where perhaps introduced to the incredible benefits and staggering threats to mangroves by entering our Mangrove Children's Art Calendar contest. For nearly 2 decades, MAP has published some of the best children's art in our annual Calendar. Be sure to order yours for 2021 and buy a few as gifts for friends and family to continue to support MAP's ongoing efforts . CLICK HERE TO ORDER YOURS!

...

REPLANTING THE FORESTS
As understanding of the importance of mangroves grew, so did efforts to replant. Many well-intentioned groups began feverish campaigns of massive replanting efforts along mud flats and other areas not suited for young mangrove seedlings. While these efforts made good headlines, the majority ended in dismal failure as the trees planted could not flourish and eventually died. Working globally with our network of scientists and NGOs, MAP helped create the "Community-Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration" (CBEMR) program. Central to this systematic approach is careful consideration of the hydrology of the area being planted, as well as careful selection of the proper species to be plantedwithin a particular  project. Allowing areas to naturally recover rather than attempting to force a monoculture of single species forests, MAP has seen tremendous success in the restoration of the Mangrove Forests we have been defending for the past quarter century! Learn More About Our CBEMR program here

So we at MAP would like to say a big THANK YOU! to our readers and supporters for helping us continue to spread the word through our newsletter. And if you aren't a subscriber already, please subscribe today.

And we love to hear from our readers! Whenever possible, we like to give you the reader the "Last word" like this one we received just prior to publishing this 500th edition:

LAST WORD


Dear MAP,

Because this is our home, any degradation to this planet affects every living being today and tomorrow. 

MAP has dedicated its energies, resources, and mission to educate the people of this beautiful earth about the place mangroves have in our lives and the role they play in protecting human habitation and sustaining wildlife. 

Supporting this fine organization is my way of wrapping my arms around the world it strives to protect and honor. Thank you Mangrove Action Project for over a quarter-century of dedication!


Francesca Quarto-Mohan


Like this newsletter? Pease consider donating to MAP to keep it going. Giving could never be easier

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...

All the MAP Team wishes to pay tribute to our dedicated MAP Quarterly, Late Friday News, and the MAP NEWS editors over the past 28 years! 
Alfredo Quarto (1992-2006), Austen Moore (2006-2009) and Sam Nugent (2009-present)!   They've helped inform, motivate, and inspire actions and change beyond their realization. 

MAP News ISSUE 500 - Aug 1, 2020

Mangrove Action Project
The MAP News
500th Edition                                                    Aug 1, 2020
FEATURE

MAP CELEBRATES ITS 500th Edition of MAP NEWS (Formerly Late Friday News)
In the hands of the fishers
USA - An extension of the MAP Quartlerly Newsletter (a hand addressed snail-mailed paper product of the last century), MAP's electronic version, The Late Friday News, marks it's 500th issue with this post. Starting in 2000, the Newsletter has faithfully gone out to MAP News subscribers around the world every other week. To celebrate the 500th issue, we take a look at some of the tremendous growth and progress Mangrove conservation and restoration have seen. When MAP was founded in 1992, the goal was to bring awareness to global need to protect tropical coastal forests for protection against cyclones, the benefit of global fisheries, coral reef health and the continuation of thousands of years of traditional livelihoods. Today, some 28 years after MAPs founding, the awareness of the importance of mangrove ecosystems is well recognized on a global scale. But they still remain under serious threat. READ MORE
Donate.jpg

GLOBAL

WORLD MANGROVE DAY PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS 2020
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GLOBAL - Welcome to our 6th World Mangrove Day! Once again as a celebration of World Mangrove Day we are harnessing the power of photography to raise awareness of mangrove forests and we are proud to share these amazing photos with you! This incredible collection of images celebrates the work of all our mangrove photographers. Our 2020 contest has been our most exciting yet, with entries from all over the world showing the true beauty and importance of mangrove ecosystems. Come and view our biggest mangrove online exhibition ever. We were inspired this year by the bold commitments being made across the world for a sustainable future and with our four brand new categories we hope to inspire action for Nature. Our categories highlight mangrove wildlife, communities, conservation, and the threats that mangrove forests are facing. READ MORE
VIEW GALLERY

Mangrove Protections Can Provide Conservation Wins
MangroveSharks
GLOBAL - On July 26, we celebrate International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem and take the opportunity to highlight why mangrove forests are some of the most valuable ecosystems on our planet. Mangroves range from shrubs to trees—some only a modest 3 meters (10 feet) tall, while others grow to a towering 40 meters (131 feet) or higher. And although species of mangroves within a forest may not be genetically related, they share common characteristics. Their unique biology enables them to thrive in a wide variety of conditions that most other trees would find toxic. They tolerate both high and fluctuating salinity and take root in salty, low-oxygen soils. This makes them ideally suited for the ever-changing coastal environment. The inclusion of mangrove protections in climate policy can be a triple win for countries, strengthening communities’ efforts to adapt to changing environments, mitigating the effects of climate change, and helping to build resilience. READ MORE

AFRICA

In Tanzania, locals and officials band together to save mangroves
A_man_checks_a_mangrove_sapling_at_a_reforestation_project_site_supported_by_UNEP_in_the_Kisakasaka_community_in_Zanzibar_Tanzania_Credit_UNEP___Hannah_McNeish.jpg?null
TANZANIA - In the lead up to International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem on 26 July, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is running a series of stories on mangroves, and their impact on the environment and economies of countries across the world. For many of the 30,000 people who live in the remote Rufiji Delta of northern Tanzania, life revolves around one thing: mangroves. These trees and bushes, which thrive in the delta's brackish water, are sources of building materials, firewood and income, providing valuable timber that residents often sell to make ends meet. But the mangroves, which are also home to many species, like ray fish, hongwe, migratory birds and sea turtles, are sometimes seen as obstacles to be cut down, occupying land that can be used to grow rice and graze livestock. Such over-dependence on mangroves in the Rufiji Delta, home to 50 per cent of Tanzania's mangroves, has led to a depletion of these forests, threatening residents’way of life. READ MORE

AMERICAS

WANTED: Mangrove Rangers
MangroveRanger
CAYMAN ISLANDS - The Mangrove Education Project is seeking a few good Caymanians for its Mangrove Ranger programme. The non-profit organisation is set to launch the new initiative on July 26 as Cayman prepares to mark World Mangrove Day. Martin Keeley, executive director of the Mangrove Education Project in Cayman, said that the Mangrove Ranger programme was borne out of a need to educate and protect the vital habitats around the islands. He said Cayman’s mangrove destruction is worrying, as he has seen the country move from development to overdevelopment."We have seen a major loss of mangrove all over the islands,” Keeley said in a telephone interview with the Cayman Compass recently. “The idea is to be able to monitor what is going on and to establish a baseline data on mangroves around the island because, at the moment, there is very little data, and so we need to establish that.  READ MORE

Fight against shrimp that eats mangroves
MangroveShrimp
USA - Close your eyes and imagine some wetlands with magical trees, with huge roots that come out of a gray, half-swampy ground. A place that is right where freshwater and saltwater meet: where there are canals to navigate, manatees, crocodiles, monkeys and many species of birds. Those are the mangroves ”. This is how Mónica Gutiérrez Quarto, a Chilean artist who now lives in the United States, describes one of the ecosystems to which she has dedicated part of her work. As a member of the Mangrove Action Project (MAP) team, an initiative founded by her husband Alfredo Quarto, she uses art to educate children around the world about mangroves: one of the most important forests for climate change. Although little is said about them, mangroves are full of stunning properties. They serve as natural barriers to prevent soil erosion, protect coastal communities from hurricanes, and are the place where fish breed. READ MORE

Mangrove forest restoration boosts Costa Rica communities
CoastRica1
COSTA RICA - Twenty years ago, I collected between 600 to 800 a day – now I’m lucky if I can harvest 150.” Adrian Torres holds a black, shining, wrinkled mollusk (Anadara tuberculosa) the size of a small chicken egg. It is known as the “mud cockle,” or here along Costa Rica’s Pacific coast, as the piangua. That’s why Adrian and the members of his community association, Ajuntaderas, are known as the “piangueros” – the mud cockle collectors. They live within the Terraba Sierpe National Wetland, one of the largest protected wetlands in Central America. For as long as Adrian can remember, his community – and others living nearby – have depended upon the harvest of this gothic looking shellfish to make their living; a practice that replaced the harvesting of timber from the wetland’s mangrove trees. READ MORE

ASIA

Towards innovative, conflict-sensitive and human rights-based approaches to forest monitoring
Myanmar1
MYANMAR- The Governments of Myanmar and Finland today launched a trailblazing project designed to allow for monitoring of forests in a manner that is sensitive to local conflicts and protects human rights. The five-year project will be led by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) thanks to a EUR 8 million endowment from the Government of Finland, a consistent partner in the promotion of environmental sustainability. The project is innovative in taking a conflict sensitive and human rights-based approach to forest monitoring. This has global relevance as it will provide insights into how to bolster sustainable forests in other fragile countries affected by conflicts that are frequently exacerbated by disputes over tenure and access to natural resources. "Actions to monitor and measure Myanmar's forests have great potential to deliver benefits for multiple purposes. READ MORE

Mangrove forests to hereafter not be converted into ponds: Minister
Indonesia2
INDONESIA - Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Minister Eddhy Prabowo has made assurance that mangrove forests would henceforth not be converted into ponds, and the ministry, in its place, plans to plant more mangrove trees. "I guarantee that there will be no more deforestation of mangrove forests in future. In its place, we will plant mangroves," Minister Prabowo noted in a statement recently. A new-fangled innovative aquaculture system has been developed that enables shrimp and fish farming without the need to have a vast land area, he remarked. Hence, mangrove trees would no longer have to be cleared to make way for shrimp or fish ponds, he explained. The Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries has been developing an innovative intensification system for shrimp farming and fish ponds. READ MORE

Meet Indonesia’s carbon guardian
Indonesia1
INDONESIA - Indonesia’s mangroves are an incredibly effective tool against climate change — but they’re being cut down to grow shrimp and palm oil for you. Large-scale palm oil production is one of the biggest drivers of deforestation in Indonesia; tens of millions of acres of primary rainforest, peatlands, and coastal lowlands have been cleared to grow the oil-rich fruit for fuel, food, and household products for consumers around the world. Palm oil was also responsible for most of the fierce fires that burned more than 2,500 square miles in Indonesia this year; some 80 percent of the fires were set to clear land for the crop, officials told the New York Times. Unless the country can dramatically slow down mangrove destruction, one of Indonesia’s best climate assets will end up only accelerating the emergency.  READ MORE

Mangroves and Khazan agriculture: Sustaining Goa’s promise for fish, curry and rice
Khazan Agriculture
INDIA - Although the Khazan lands had a diverse set of owners which included government, religious bodies, private holders, the most dominant form of Khazan land tenure pre-1961 was that of the Communidades. These were community lands collectively owned and managed by the Communidade of a given area. Their management involved a number of tasks which included the construction, maintenance and operation of bunds and sluice gates, the leasing of farming and fishing rights and instituting penalties for the breach of rules among many others Today, for various reasons, but primarily due to post-independence agrarian reforms of 1961, these lands largely lie fallow and are in a state of decay. Lack of cultivation and maintenance of the bunds and sluice gates is leading to their breaching and the natural reclamation of these fallow lands by mangroves.  READ MORE

Save Maldives pledges to save Neykurendhoo wetlands on Mangrove Day
Maldives1
MALDIVES - On the occasion of the International Day for the Conservation of Mangrove Ecosystems, Save Maldives reaffirmed the campaign's efforts to save the withering wetlands of Neykurendhoo, Haa Dhaalu Atoll. The death and decay of Neykurendhoo's mangroves were first observed in March, prompting the island council to bring the matter to the attention of relevant authorities. Neykurendhoo's wetlands were designated a protected environmental site in December 2018 and are among the largest and most ecologically rich mangrove ecosystems in the country, in addition to being an important food source for the people of the region. "On this International Day for the Conservation of Mangrove Ecosystems, we wish to inform the public of the critical importance of mangroves to the Maldives and to highlight the fact that the Maldives is a mangroves nation with many of our islands protected and served by wetlands and mangrove ecosystems", a statement publicised by the collective read. READ MORE

Mangrove conservation up against socioeconomic realities of forest resources
Myanmar2
MYANMAR - Arakan State residents are deleteriously cutting down mangroves growing along the state’s coast to earn a living, say organisations working to conserve the valuable shoreline forests. Mangroves are deforested to sell firewood for brick-making fields and to make charcoal, said Ko Myo Lwin, a leader of the Ann Township Mangrove Trees Conservation Group. “Villagers find it difficult to get a job for their living. Additionally, COVID-19 is one of the factors creating hardships for their living. That’s why some residents rely on mangrove forests for income,” said Ko Myo Lwin. The current socioeconomic trends require that mangrove forests be conserved, he added. READ MORE

LAST WORD


Dear MAP,


Because this is our home, any degradation to this planet affects every living being today and tomorrow.

MAP has dedicated its energies, resources, and mission to educate the people of this beautiful earth about the place mangroves have in our lives And the role they play in protecting human habitation and sustaining wildlife.

Supporting this fine organization is my way of wrapping my arms around the world it strives to protect and honor. Thank you Mangrove Action Project for over a quarter-century of dedication!


Francesca Quarto-Mohan

Like this newsletter?
Pease consider donating to MAP to keep it going. 
Giving could never be easier
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MAP's PHOTO CONTEST GALLERY HERE

2021
CHILDREN'S ART CALENDAR
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ENTRIES NEEDED!

MAP Calendar 2020


Singing for the Sundarbans WATCH HERE

Entrevista con Monica Quarto del Mangrove Action Project (Spanish language) Oye Aqui

ACTION ALERTS

Please SIGN: keep plantations out of orangutan habitat!
TAKE ACTION

Unilever: stop destroying mangroves for convenience food! SIGN OUR PETITION 

Stop plundering the oceans for industrial aquaculture! SIGN THE PETITION


Take action now and stop the build-out of coal plants in Bangladesh.

Save Kakinada mangrove forest – Sign the Petition

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CBEMR Training in Tanzania: Ground-breaking training breathes life into mangrove ecosystem restoration - The Mangrove Alliance

Please see our newest video: " Restoring The Natural Mangrove Forest" - https://youtu.be/Vh7CoPBLQa8

Mangrove Restoration Map 
VIEW MAP HERE

Restoring natural forests
Restoring The Natural Mangrove Forest
Watch movie

Tanzania CBEMR
Community Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration in Rufiji Delta 
VIEW VIDEO

Video: Mangroves for the Future - A look bacK. As the latest phase of Mangroves for the Future (MFF) draws to a close, this video highlights some of the project’s most successful initiatives – from local women supporting national park management in Viet Nam to an island in the Maldives that has become a model for waste management, and everything in between. View Here

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MANGROVE ISSUES 

Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION

What is CBEMR?
Download MAP's 2 page CBEMR Information Sheet containing links to all MAP's CBEMR resources – CLICK HERE

What is EPIC? - The Ecosystems Protecting Infrastructure and Communities (EPIC) project:  the role of ecosystems as protective barriers against climate induced hazards

MANGROVES APP AVAILABLE
A pictorial field guide for easy identification of various mangrove species and learning about the mangroves ecosystem. CLICK HERE

View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  
WATCH VIDEO


WATCH - Mangroves: how they help the ocean
Economist_Mangroves

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

The Value of Mangrove Forests View Video

CBEMR Experience Exchange MAP 2017 English Subtitles
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Mangroves: Guidebook to MalaysiaClick Here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE

SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".

Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
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INTERVIEW – Yale Climate Connection interview with MAP's Alfredo Quarto LISTEN

Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more


Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

The Marvellous Mangroves Education Forum is an online hub for those utilizing the Marvellous Mangroves (MM) Curriculum. It gives students, teachers and anyone interested in mangroves, the opportunity to learn and share ideas themed around the curriculum, to connect and communicate with others around the globe whilst exploring mangroves from your computer or on the go. VISIT

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The award-winning Marvellous Mangroves (MM) curriculum educates children on the importance of mangroves and their ecological functions, teaching them about modern challenges and mechanisms for sustainability. VIEW VIDEO

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

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Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
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Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More


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"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp


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Mangrove Action Project

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Thursday, July 30, 2020

Mangrove Action Project - Fight against shrimp that eats mangroves

Written by Monica Monsalve and Molly Multedo for


 Close your eyes and imagine some wetlands with magical trees, with huge roots that come out of a gray, half-swampy ground. A place that is right where freshwater and saltwater meet: where there are canals to navigate, manatees, crocodiles, monkeys and many species of birds. Those are the mangroves ”. This is how Mónica Gutiérrez Quarto, a Chilean artist who now lives in the United States, describes one of the ecosystems to which she has dedicated part of her work.

As a member of the Mangrove Action Project (MAP) team, an initiative founded by her husband Alfredo Quarto, she uses art to educate children around the world about mangroves: one of the most important forests for climate change. Although little is said about them, mangroves are full of stunning properties. They serve as natural barriers to prevent soil erosion, protect coastal communities from hurricanes, and are the place where fish breed. Furthermore, as Gutiérrez explains, "they sequester five times more carbon dioxide than other trees." In fact, according to The Convention on Wetlands, known as the Ramsar Convention, mangroves and the corresponding wetlands represent almost a third of the world's terrestrial carbon reserves. What makes them key to combat climate change.


But as with many ecosystems, mangroves are under threat. Alfredo found out about this several years ago when he traveled to southern Thailand and knew the problem first hand. There, as in other parts of the world, shrimp farms were being installed, which affected not only the ecosystem, but also threatened the communities that live on them and were opposing these projects. Since then, their mission, together with MAP, has been to work to reforest and restore them. But they do not do it in a conventional way, simply by planting the trees and their seeds, but by involving the community. A method that, according to Quarto, has proven to be more effective.


In addition, as part of the line of education, MAP has contacted several schools in different parts of the world so that teachers can teach students why their community benefits from mangroves. Part of the initiative is for children to make a piece of art to participate in a contest, led by Monica, to make one of those works part of the world's mangrove calendar. “Each school sends us three or four pieces and we choose one. Then we send them the calendar with the certificate that they participated and the children love it, because they are part of an international project, with students from all sides, "says the artist. Although most of the mangroves are Indonesia, Latin America follows in importance of these territories. According to the EcoAmericas portal, Brazil is the second country with the most mangroves and the ecosystem can also be found in Mexico, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and other Central American nations. In the United States there are mangroves on the Florida coast.

Note -

This story was developed in collaboration with Project Drawdown and is based on the Coastal Wetland Restoration solution .


Saturday, July 18, 2020

MAP Issue #499 - July 18, 2020

Mangrove Action Project
The MAP News
499th Edition                                                     July 18, 2020
FEATURE

Cyclone Amphan reminds us why mangrove conservation is essential
Myanmar CBEMR MAP Training
INDIA - “Before 2009, we had never planted a mangrove before, we were working on wildlife and tigers. Cyclone Aila was an eye-opener for us ﹘ whatever you do in the Sundarbans, it has to be mangrove conservation in essence. If the mangroves are not there, the wildlife won’t be there, the people won’t be there, the delta won’t be there.” Ajanta Dey, Joint Secretary and Program Director, Nature Environment and Wildlife Society (NEWS), a conservation NGO working on ecology, sustainable livelihood and natural resource management in the Sundarbans area of West Bengal said, days after the state was ravaged by Cyclone Amphan, one of the worst cyclones, since 1737, some have claimed, plunging many regions into a power blackout.  Jim Enright, Community-based Ecological Mangrove Restoration (CBEMR) trainer and former Asia coordinator, Mangrove Action Project (MAP), an organization working on mangrove restoration, education and advocacy across the globe, explained MAP’s CBEMR model, which involves community buy-in from the inception of the program to better understand their needs and abilities.  “The community is central to the mangroves. They live in the mangroves, they depend on the mangroves, their livelihoods are connected to the mangroves. If they don’t have full ownership, it’s never going to work. This is again why we observe many government projects failing, because they never involve the local people in the decision-making process or long-term protection.” he says. READ MORE

GLOBAL

Momentum Growing Globally for Using Marine Protections to Address Climate Change
Addressing Climate Change
GLOBAL - This year, the 197 Parties to the Paris Agreement are updating their domestic climate commitments, known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), to reduce global emissions and climate change impacts. Science tells us that countries need to step up the ambition within these NDCs, and within each subsequent revision every 5 years going forward, in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and bring the world on track to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement. Recognition is growing across governments that nature-based solutions, which the International Union for Conservation of Nature defines as “actions to protect, sustainably manage, and restore natural or modified ecosystems,” can be a bigger part of the solution to climate change. The degree to which different nature-based solutions mitigate and build resilience to climate change varies but, nonetheless, policymakers are becoming increasingly aware that they are an underutilized tool. For example, some countries could protect and restore coastal wetlands, such as mangrove, seagrass and saltmarsh habitats, a move that could safeguard the range of benefits these habitats provide to people and nature. READ MORE

AFRICA

Supporting sustainable seaweed farming for East Africa’s coastal communities
Tanzania
TANZANIA - Climate change and unsustainable practices are threatening seaweed farming in Tanzania, an industry that employs over 25,000 farmers, of whom around 80 percent are women. To help address these challenges, The Nature Conservancy is partnering with Cargill, local governments and researchers to empower communities through increased productivity, environmental training and mentorship. Along the Tanzanian coastline, seaweed aquaculture is an important industry to coastal women and also serves as an alternative livelihood to overharvested local fisheries. However, Tanzanian seaweed aquaculture has been stagnating recently, due to issues that include changing water-quality conditions and poor seedstock. Additionally, unsustainable farming practices damage sensitive coastal habitats. That said, when practiced well, seaweed aquaculture has the potential to be ecologically restorative and provide ecosystem services, while still producing a marketable product. To help address these roadblocks to sustainability, my team at The Nature Conservancy and our partners at Cargill are launching a new community-empowerment and environmental-training programme in Tanzania. This partnership will be a collaboration between us, Cargill’s Red Seaweed Promise, local suppliers, government partners and researchers to work with seaweed farmers on Unguja and Pemba Islands, part of Tanzania’s Zanzibar Archipelago. By working with villages, we will be able to host farmer training workshops and build local leadership capacity via mentoring programmes. This mentorship will build much-needed local capacity and ensure a continued technical presence. READ MORE
 
ASIA

Neykurendhoo Mangrove Forest under threat!
Neyrukrendhoo-Maldives
MALDIVES - Neykurendhoo is home to one of the biggest mangrove forests in the Maldives which is now under the threat of being critically damaged. The mangove in the island of HDh. Neykurahdoo is one of the biggest in the country. But today we are faced with the stark reality that this natural gift for us might be taken away from us. The island’s council left no stones unturned in their attempt to highlight this concerning outturn to the relevant authorities. Photos of the disintegrating mangrove that has been circulated in social media platforms accentuate the graveness of its condition. In December 2018, President Ibrahim Mohamed Solih pledged to protect and conserve H.dh Neykurendhoo’s mangrove forest and wetland as per his 100 day pledge to conserve– in accordance with international standards–at least one island, one reef, and one wetland in each atoll. READ MORE
 
Civil war didn’t hurt this Sri Lankan mangrove forest, but shrimp farming might
Sri Lanka Mangroves
SRILANKA - The Vidattaltivu coastal belt in Sri Lanka’s north was once home to the marine unit of the Tamil Tiger guerrilla group, known as the “Sea Tigers.” From here, the group launched explosive-laden suicide boats in attacks against the much more powerful fighter vessels of the country’s naval forces. The area’s lush mangroves proved an effective hiding place for storing explosives. More than a decade after the end of the civil war, the ecology of this picturesque nature reserve is under threat: there are plans to set up a shrimp aquaculture park here, which environmentalists have blasted as “environmental suicide.” Sri Lanka has a bitter history of shrimp farms going wrong. In the 1980s, large swaths of mangroves in the northwestern coast were cleared to farm shrimps for export. But frequent outbreaks of disease led to about 90% of the shrimp farms being abandoned. READ MORE
 
Meet The Man Who Spent Time With The Mysterious Mangrove Tigers
bengal-tiger-yawning-in-sundarban
BANGLADESH - Over the years, few outsiders have dared venture into the beautiful yet terrifying terrain of the famous Swamp tigers. This Bengal tiger population inhabits the mysterious mangrove forests of the Sundarbans on the delta along the Bay of Bengal in India and Bangladesh. Throughout history, these tigers have inspired the awe. They have been revered for their enigmatic nature and ability to inhabit a land where everyday life is a constant struggle. These tigers have also earned a reputation as "man-eaters" but that remains a debatable issue.  The world's only tiger population to inhabit the mangroves, the lives of the Sundarbans tigers are shrouded in secrecy. Even today, a lot remains undiscovered about them. The harsh nature of their unique habitat hinders most from studying these tigers in detail. But one man, an award-winning wildlife cameraman, Mike Herd, was not to be stopped. His first glimpse of a stunning male Sundarbans tiger along the bank of a river enticed him enough to dedicate nearly half a year to filming these tigers. Without paying any heed to warnings about the alleged "man-eaters," he decided to enter the home turf of these tigers in the year 2000 in the Sundarbans forests of Bangladesh. His dedication, fearlessness, patience, and talent led to the production of the multi-award winning "Swamp Tigers" documentary. To this day, "Swamp Tigers" continues to thrill viewers by bringing them face to face with the legendary Sundarbans tigers! World Atlas had the privilege of speaking with Mike Herd, the first person in the world to film the elusive Sundarbans tigers. READ MORE
 
Oil slick threatens Philippine mangrove forest recovering from earlier spill
Philippines Oilspill
PHILLIPINES - An oil spill on July 3 threatens a mangrove forest on the Philippine island of Guimaras, an area only just recovering from the country’s largest spill in 2006. This latest spill stems from an explosion onboard a floating power barge in the 13-kilometer (8-mile) waterway between the city of Iloilo and Guimaras Island. Operator AC Energy Inc. said the incident spilled 48,000 liters (12,700 gallons) of fuel oil into the Iloilo River and its tributaries before being contained eight hours later. But the Philippine Coast Guard said around 251,000 liters (66,300 gallons) of oil had spread around the waterway. The day after, July 4, the Coast Guard estimated it had collected 130,000 liters (34,300 gallons) of oil. Some of the oil was swept out of the containment area by strong waves and carried across to communities in Guimaras. “The root cause has yet to be determined,” AC Energy said in a statement. “But initial findings reveal that the discharge is due to the ignition of fuel oil in storage which ruptured the barge’s fuel tank.” READ MORE
 
Overlooked Methane Emissions Can Halve Climate Benefits of Subtropical Mangrove Wetlands
overlooked-methane-emissions
HONG KONG - An international collaborative study led by Professor Derrick Yuk Fo Lai at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK), joined by top-tier scientists from around the world, has discovered that sustained methane emissions from the subtropical estuarine mangroves can reduce its climatic cooling effects by over 50%, over a period of 20 years. The team produced the world’s first-ever multi-year dataset of ecosystem-scale methane emissions from a subtropical estuarine mangrove based on the data collected at Mai Po Nature Reserve in Hong Kong, which points out that global warming and greater river runoff may lead to increasing methane emissions. The findings have recently been published in Global Change Biology. Vegetated coastal wetlands such as mangroves and salt marshes sequester more carbon than any other ecosystems. They exhibit high rates of photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake and sediment trapping, leading to significant carbon storage in the ecosystem and hence reduced accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The potential of managing this “blue carbon” for climate change mitigation has received increasing attention in recent years in the international community READ MORE

AMERICAS

Mangrove protection, Caribbean coral loss, dam development and more
mangrove study
USA - More than 31 million people worldwide live in regions that are extremely vulnerable to sea-level rise and hurricanes or tropical cyclones. According to a new study, mangroves and coral reefs could help protect more than a quarter of people at risk by serving as a buffer between coastal communities and ocean waves or flooding, and by significantly reducing erosion. Conservation International scientists Dave Hole, Will Turner and Mariano Gonzalez-Roglich looked at mangrove forests and coral reefs situated near coastal populations around the world. They found that communities across Central America, the Caribbean, Eastern Africa, Southeast Asia and the South Pacific region stand to benefit the most from the conservation of these coastal ecosystems. Based on a range of economic and other societal factors, these communities have fewer opportunities to adapt via other means, such as building sea walls or buying insurance. READ MORE
 
25 million gallons of Longboat sewage spill onto mangrove habitat
Longboat Key
USA - More than 25 million gallons of sewage spilled onto the shoreline area of Longbar Point in West Bradenton from a ruptured wastewater pipe that carries all of Longboat Key’s wastewater to the mainland. Longboat Key Town Manager Tom Harmer said staff and state and county agencies will investigate the exact cause of the break, the time it began and the extent of the spill and any incursion into Sarasota Bay. The area of the spill is in the mangrove habitat that forms a buffer between the bay and the mainland and is on property owned by developer Carlos Beruff. Harmer said Longboat staff was aware of anomalies and disparities in what was shown being pumped at Longboat Key lift stations and what was registering at Manatee County’s wastewater facility on the mainland. Manatee County facility workers first noticed possible issues on June 17, and communicated with Longboat staff over the next two weeks. Initially, Longboat believed it was a meter or equipment issue at the pumping or treatment station. It wasn’t until June 29 that the spill was discovered by Manatee employees after they inspected the area that the pipe traverses.  The break in the pipe was discovered and repaired the same day by the town’s emergency contractors. It is unknown at this time how much sewage flowed directly into Sarasota Bay. READ MORE
 
Mangrove restoration to begin
Cape Coral Florida
USA - Mangroves that were damaged one year ago due to botched maintenance work project by the city of Cape Coral will be replaced next weekend, weather permitting. Local non-profit group Keep Lee County Beautiful, in conjunction with the city and with 15 volunteers from the Cape Coral group "Citizens for the Preservation of Four Mile Cove" will plant 164 mangroves along the shoreline at Coral Pointe Canal on July 18. This is the last box on a checklist mandated by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection on what the city needed to do to remedy its July 2019 maintenance work that's purpose, according to the city, was the removal of invasive exotic vegetation from the canal bank which impeded draining and restricted navigation. In the process, according to FDEP, they damaged mangroves, which are protected in Florida. Mike Thomas, program manager with Keep Lee County Beautiful said they were more than happy to take part in this replanting project." READ MORE

EUROPE
 
The carbon on your plate: mangrove and aquaculture
Aquaculture
E.U. - One of the biggest threats to mangrove forests is the expansion of aquaculture ponds. Roughly 30 percent of mangrove deforestation and coastal land-use change in Southeast Asia has been attributed to aquaculture, especially shrimp farming. And as the top aquaculture commodity, the marine shrimp industry is forecast to continue its expansion, according to a report launched by Planet Tracker. Yet, somewhat ironically, deforestation may damage the shrimp industry, which the non-profit financial think tank says is worth $45 billion, globally. Coastal degradation and deforestation will make shrimp farms more prone to damage and diseases, resulting in higher operating costs and lower profit margins. Positive signs are emerging for ecologically conscious investors and as more countries and companies within the shrimp aquaculture sector have started to adopt deforestation-free value chain policies. The European Union, the biggest importer of shrimp from Southeast Asia, is a trendsetter in this regard. Pressures from investors are also key to achieving more sustainable, deforestation-free aquaculture, says Matthew McLuckie, director of Investor Relations at Planet Tracker. READ MORE

LAST WORD

Dear All,

Please help spread the word on this year's children's mangrove art calendar competition! The contest is now open to anyone from any country between the ages of 6-15. Keep in mind, the deadline is Aug. 30th, so lets get those entries in ASAP!

Do you know a budding artist or a gifted child? We would love to feature their vision of what the mangroves mean to them, our planet and their future.

For more information, please visit Mangrove Action Project Calendar Project or download the PDF here

Ciao,
Monica Quarto
monicagquarto@olympus.net

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2021
CHILDREN'S ART CALENDAR

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