Saturday, July 6, 2019

MAP News Issue 472 - July 6, 2019

Mangrove Action Project
The MAP News
472nd Edition                                                     July 6, 2019

FEATURE

5th Photography Contest in the run up to the 26th July, International Mangrove Day
PhotographyContest-Poster

Dear MAP Friends,

We are fast approaching 26th July, the International Day for the Conservation of Mangroves. We at the Mangrove Action Project have launched our 5th Photography Contest in celebration of this special day. We would be thrilled if you would join us and enter your favorite mangrove photos which will become part of a global mangrove exhibition this year. 

There are some great prizes to be won and we're aiming to make this years' the most stunning photo gallery yet, reflecting the diversity and beauty of mangroves worldwide.

Please pass this on to any friends, family or colleagues you may think would be interested in the contest.

Many Thanks. CLICK HERE for more information and to enter photos


GLOBAL

Group aims to protect the Fishing Cat of the Mangroves.
Fishing_Cat
GLOBAL- Fishing cats are native to wetlands, rivers, and mangrove forests in South and Southeast Asia. They prey primarily on fish and crustaceans. Like many other rare species, not much is known about fishing cats in the wild. They are threatened by habitat destruction, poaching, and a lack of awareness throughout much of their range. Mangroves, which are prime habitat for fishing cats, provide local people with nurseries for fish and protect entire communities from storm surges. However, many mangroves where fishing cats live are quickly being lost to deforestation and aquaculture. We are educating and empowering local communities to study, protect and restore habitat for this vulnerable cat and its globally important mangrove habitat in their backyards. Fishing Cat Conservancy projects are centered around education and capacity building to enhance citizen involvement and stewardship in wildlife conservation. READ MORE

AFRICA

VICTORY: Plans for Massive Coal Project in Kenya Canceled
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KENYA - a Kenyan tribunal canceled plans to build the country’s first-ever coal fired power plant, citing environmental and public health risks. This immense, hard-fought victory would not have been possible without years of advocacy and resistance by a strong network of anti-coal activist groups across the region. One group that has been integral to the resistance efforts is Save Lamu, a Global Greengrants Fund grantee. The 1,050 megawatt Chinese-backed power plant would have increased the country’s greenhouse gas emissions by 700%, according to activists. Moreover, the megaproject would have significantly damaged the health and livelihoods of locals in the coastal community of Lamu – a UNESCO world heritage site and among the oldest and best-preserved Swahili settlements in East Africa. The tribunal found that the government had breached the law for approving construction of the project without an environmental impact assessment. It also found that the government violated the rights of local people, failing to inform the public of the health risks associated with the project, which include difficulty breathing, premature death, and acid rain contamination of food and water sources. READ MORE

Challenges and opportunities in the adoption of community forestry
IPLU
CONGO - Securing access to land, territories and natural resources promotes the autonomous development of indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs). In recent years, community-led forest management has become increasingly recognised as a potential way to reduce deforestation and improve the livelihoods of rural communities that rely entirely on forests to make a living. Indeed, there is a consensus that areas of forest under community control often deliver the best results from a social and environmental point of view2. The possibility for IPLCs to manage the traditional forests on which they subsist has not yet been formally established in Congo. Despite the opportunities that community forestry offers for IPLCs to secure customary land rights and improve their livelihoods, a number or constraints and challenges persist in relation to land tenure insecurity and overlapping. READ MORE

AMERICAS

The art and science of mangrove conservation
Octavio Aburto Art of Mangroves
MEXICO - Mangroves—the trees that grow between the land and the ocean—have a big job. They filter water, store carbon, and help protect coastline communities from storm surges. Yet over the past five decades, an estimated 50 percent of global mangrove coverage has been lost. Now, Octavio Aburto is working to save them—one photo at a time. Octavio knows the transformative power of the camera lens. The 2018 Pew marine fellow and Scripps Institution of Oceanography professor has long used photography to capture the public's imagination and bring attention to his research. "Taking an aerial picture to understand a forest problem is radically changing how we're doing science." Octavio Aburto, 2018 Pew marine fellow and professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography LEARN MORE

Project to begin to protect Mangrove Island on the Loxahatchee River
Mangrove Island
USA - The Loxahatchee River was Florida’s first designated river in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. “A tremendously popular site for both commercial and recreational fishing," said Mike Grella with the Jupiter Inlet District. But a piece of its scenery, is disappearing. “Mangrove Island has begin to erode fairly significantly over the past four or five decades," Grella said. Now a barge sits in the middle of the river next to the island. On it, the first pieces for its protection. “We’re going to lay down the breakwaters and instead of just one, we’re going to place three or four," according to Grella. He said the rocks will be placed around the island's historical perimeter, allowing the mangroves to expand. “They provide habitat for all types of creatures, shellfish, a nursery for fish.” READ MORE

ASIA

Ministry adds report on Maldives to their website, available to the public
Kfushi-mangrove
REPLUBLIC OF MALDIVES - On 27 Feb. 2019 Alfredo Quarto, the cofounder of the NGO Mangrove Action Project and International Program Development Director and Maldive's Minister of Environment H.E. Dr. Hussain Rasheed Hassan, agreed to conduct a collaborative investigation between MAP and the Ministry concerning the possibility to restore and conserve the remaining mangroves on the island of Kulhudhuffushi. After Dr. Hassen announced his intent to support such an international investigation into the status of the remaining mangroves on Kulhudhuffushi, Quarto invited Drs Joe Lee and Dan Friese, fellow members of the IUCN Mangrove Specialist Group (MSG), to join him, as well as MAP’s Asia Coordinator Jim Enright on this project. Both MAP and MSG are dedicated to the objectives of conserving and restoring the planet’s threatened mangroves, and the opportunity to work towards this directive at Kulhudhuffushi was of great interest to both organizations. Preparations were started for the MAP – MSG team to visit the Maldives 11-13 April, 2019 amid local reports that the remaining mangroves were under threat, the water body drying-up and a large fish kill had occurred, at Kulhudhuffushi. READ MORE

Groups urge Government to stop pushing the Sundarbans towards destruction
a-tiger-in-sundarbans
BANGLADESH - In the light of ongoing threats on the world’s largest mangrove forest, the Sundarbans, located at the Indian-Bangladeshi border, we write to the country delegates to the 43rd Session of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee by calling for an urgent intervention into Bangladesh government’s decision to implement the destructive Rampal coal power-plant. As concerned global citizens, earth defenders, climate organisations and researchers, and members of Bangladeshi environmental groups abroad, we express our unequivocal support to the draft decision generated by international biodiversity experts and to be discussed and voted in Baku on 4 July 2019. We welcome the draft decision that calls in particular to halt the construction of the coal plants at Rampal, Taltali and Kalapara and 154 other active industrial activities in southwest Bangladesh until the exact impacts for the forest have been critically assessed. VIEW PETITION AND SIGNATORIES

Mangroves protect coastal areas and should not be razed for bullet train
Bullet Train
INDIA - 54,000 mangrove trees will be razed for the Mumbai-Ahmedabad bullet train project, all in a bid to satiate the PM's dream project. the state transport minister Diwakar Raote as saying that the legislative council that the government will plant five times the trees that will be cut and will compensate the locals who are likely to be affected. A total of 1,379 hectares will likely be acquired for the project: 724.13 hectares of private land in Gujarat and 270.65 hectares in Maharashtra. Despite studies showing the benefits of mangroves, the government is still going ahead with the bullet train project. The nearly Rs 1 lakh crore project which runs a length of 508km will cut down travel time between Mumbai and Ahmedabad to just two hours. READ MORE
 
In India’s Sundarbans, communities shrink as their island sinks
Mousuni-River
INDIA - Adapting to global heating in the Sundarbans has been happening incrementally for decades. In 1996, the island of Lohachara became the first populated island in the world to be engulfed by the sea, and its inhabitants the world’s first climate refugees. The Indian government relocated the island’s people to one of the largest islands in the Sundarbans, Sagar, which neighbors Mousuni. It would take a devastating storm nearly 15 years later for the Indian and Bangladeshi governments to publicly state that climate change was a major force impacting the lives of people in the Sundarbans. In 2009, Cyclone Aila killed close to 340 people across India and Bangladesh and left more than a million homeless. Aila was a major turning point in the lives of many locals, but it was not the start of their troubles and the river’s expanding appetite. Without drastic international action to lower carbon emissions fueling the climate crisis, hundreds of thousands of Sundarbans residents will likely be forced to migrate inland. Many can’t afford to leave and most don’t want to, the best alternative being dirty and cramped slums in India’s major cities. READ MORE

OCEANA

Dead mangrove forests found to emit more methane than live trees
Mangrove Dieoff
AUSTRALIA - Mangrove die-offs in north Queensland could have a disproportionate effect on the level of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Mangrove forests that died along a 1,000km stretch of coastline in northern Australia have been emitting methane at rates eight times higher than live trees, according to new research. Scientists from Southern Cross University have used the site of the mass dieback along the Gulf of Carpentaria to measure methane emissions from mangrove tree stems for the first time. Forests of mangroves along the coastline died as a result of extreme heat, rainfall shortages and low sea levels in the summer of 2015-16. The mass mortality is one of the worst cases of forest dieback ever recorded and happened in the same year as the mass coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. Researchers travelled to the Gulf of Carpentaria in August last year to measure methane emissions from an area of live mangroves, then compared them to those from an area of dead mangroves about two kilometres away. READ MORE

Mangrove forests could 'drown' due to rising seas
Northern Australia Mangroves
AUSTRALIA - It's low tide on a sunny, dry season afternoon in the mangrove forest at East Arm in Darwin Harbour. As the tide laps at the dense tangle of roots that run for thousands of hectares along northern Australia's pristine coastline, it's hard to comprehend these forests could be wiped out by the end of the century. "They're definitely vulnerable," said Madeline Goddard, a PhD candidate at Charles Darwin University. Ms Goddard is studying mangroves to see how they will adapt to rising sea levels."Across the world the sea level is rising, increasing the amount of time mangroves spend underwater, potentially flooding and killing these valuable forests," Ms Goddard said. It is a fear shared by the Australian Marine Conservation Society. Northern Territory manager Jason Fowler said the mangroves could drown because sediment was accumulating slower than the rate that the sea level was rising. READ MORE

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ACTION ALERTS

5th Photography Contest in the run up to the 26th July, International Mangrove Day
join us and enter your favorite mangrove photos which will become part of a global mangrove exhibition this year. CLICK HERE


Keep loggers out of Selous Game Reserve!
Tanzania’s government is moving ahead with its plans for a hydroelectric dam in Selous Game Reserve. A huge swath of the UNESCO World Heritage site and habitat of iconic African wildlife would suffer irreparable damage. 1,500 km2 – an area the size of London – has just been opened to logging. Please help us protect Selous. SIGN PETITION

Don't trash coral reefs for the cruise industry! - TAKE ACTION

Sea turtles or condominiums?
Sand mining and construction work would wipe out a marine biodiversity hotspot and destroy the livelihoods of local people, who have not been consulted. Please SIGN!


Save Penang! Reject the 3-Islands Reclamation
The lack of public consultation and detailed information about the project is shocking in view of the size of proposed reclamation which is 4,500 acres or 7 square miles
PLEASE SIGN

Save Pulau Kukup National Park - second largest mangrove island in the world. Sign The Petition

Like this newsletter? Pease consider donating to MAP to keep it going. Giving could never be easier
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UPCOMING EVENTS

2019 Environmental Science and Climate Change Conference September 10-11, 2019
2019-climate-change-conference-logo
REGISTER NOW



Restoring natural forests
Restoring The Natural Mangrove Forest
Watch movie

Tanzania CBEMR
Community Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration in Rufiji Delta 
VIEW VIDEO

Video: Mangroves for the Future - A look bacK. As the latest phase of Mangroves for the Future (MFF) draws to a close, this video highlights some of the project’s most successful initiatives – from local women supporting national park management in Viet Nam to an island in the Maldives that has become a model for waste management, and everything in between. View Here

Making the case for Emergency Climate Change Action

Mapping Mangroves
Counting Mangroves

Poet
Placencia mangrove workshop teacher's poem

Volunteer with MAP - LEARN MORE

Watch Children's Mangrove Art Calendar Promo 2019 Click Here

2019_Calendar_CoverSPONSOR_MAP
MAP 2019 Children’s Calendar  CLICK HERE

You can help ensure that the knowledge and skills needed to conserve and restore mangroves is preserved in coastal communities READ MORE

WANT TO GET INVOLVED?
Follow and Join MAP!
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VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY
VOLUNTEER WITH MAP

MANGROVE ISSUES 

Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION

What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

What is EPIC? - The Ecosystems Protecting Infrastructure and Communities (EPIC) project:  the role of ecosystems as protective barriers against climate induced hazards

MANGROVES APP AVAILABLE
A pictorial field guide for easy identification of various mangrove species and learning about the mangroves ecosystem. CLICK HERE
View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  
WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

The Value of Mangrove Forests View Video

CBEMR Experience Exchange MAP 2017 English Subtitles
VIEW THE VIDEO

Mangroves: Guidebook to MalaysiaClick Here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE
SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".
Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
EPIC-Film 2
 
Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

The Marvellous Mangroves Education Forum is an online hub for those utilizing the Marvellous Mangroves (MM) Curriculum. It gives students, teachers and anyone interested in mangroves, the opportunity to learn and share ideas themed around the curriculum, to connect and communicate with others around the globe whilst exploring mangroves from your computer or on the go. VISIT

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The award-winning Marvellous Mangroves (MM) curriculum educates children on the importance of mangroves and their ecological functions, teaching them about modern challenges and mechanisms for sustainability. VIEW VIDEO

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

MAP%20Curriculum%20Video
Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW
VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

Like this newsletter? Pease consider donating to MAP to keep it going. Giving could never be easier
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Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

 Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE

"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection
Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp


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Mangrove Action Project
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Saturday, June 22, 2019

MAP NEWS Issue 471 - June 22, 2019

Mangrove Action Project
The MAP News
471st Edition                                                     June 22, 2019

FEATURE

Empowering CBEMR Ambassadors and Strengthening the MAP CBEMR Network
MAP CBEMR Workshop
THAILAND - The Mangrove Action Project (MAP) has been promoting and working on Community-Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration (CBEMR) with coastal communities along the Andaman Coast since 2012. A group of communities have gathered together as an informal network calling themselves the “CBEMR Network”. On the 20th to 22nd of April, 2019 the second workshop on “public speaking and presentation skills” was held in Krabi Province for fifteen CBEMR ambassadors from five of MAP’s CBEMR communities representing three provinces in Southern Thailand: Trang, Krabi and Phang-Nga. The three day workshop was facilitated by a professional instructor, Khun Wara Chaitap, from Chiang Mai. This training was a follow up workshop for the Facilitation Skills workshop held in May 2018. The workshop aimed to strengthen the participants’ skills on how to share and present CBEMR experiences and lessons learnt with outsiders especially from the government sector. As most of the CBEMR community representatives regularly host and attend meetings and workshops, there are opportunities for them to deliver their experiences confidently. MAP believes that it is a very important strategy for local peoples’ voices to be heard and their role to be recognized not only through their practices but also through their presentations when they have opportunities. READ MORE


GLOBAL

Can planting billions of trees save the planet?
Replanting mangroves
GLOBAL - Organisations from around the world are reforesting at an unprecedented rate. The global elite is embracing tree-hugging rhetoric. It is as if the world has suddenly woken up to the restorative powers of plants. Forests can stop runaway global heating, encourage rainfall, guarantee clean water, reduce air pollution, and provide livelihoods for local people and reserves for rare wildlife. Politicians are waking up to the potential of “natural climate solutions” – reforestation and other ecological restoration – to capture carbon and tackle the climate crisis. Such solutions could provide 37% of the greenhouse gas mitigation required to provide a good chance of stabilising global heating below the critical 2C threshold. But it isn’t as simple as just grabbing seeds and saplings and sticking them in the ground. Non-native plantations can cause problems for biodiversity, local livelihoods – or both. Grand pledges aren’t always met. A 2014 UN declaration pledged to halve deforestation by 2020. Instead, record deforestation ensued and in 2018 an area of primary forest the size of Belgium was lost, the third-highest annual depletion since records began in 2001. Claire Dubois, who founded TreeSisters with a friend, Bernadette Ryder, says TreeSisters’ philosophy is different: local, community-based reforestation with native trees in the tropics. READ MORE

From sharks in seagrass to manatees in mangroves, large marine species found in surprising places
Mangrove Shark
GLOBAL - When we think of mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltmarshes, we don't immediately think of shark habitats. But the first global review of links between large marine animals (megafauna) and coastal wetlands is challenging this view—and how we might respond to the biodiversity crisis. Mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltmarshes support rich biodiversity, underpin the livelihoods of more than a billion people worldwide, store carbon, and protect us from extreme weather events. We know marine megafauna also use these habitats to live, feed and breed. Green turtles and manatees, for instance, are known to eat seagrass, and dolphins hunt in mangroves. But new associations are also being discovered. The bonnethead shark—a close relative of hammerheads—was recently found to eat and digest seagrass. The problem is that we're losing these important places. READ MORE

World Rainforest Day June 22, 2019
World Rainforest Day
Rainforests are vital for the survival of life on Earth – the Amazon alone provides 20% of the oxygen we breathe and the freshwater we drink. They absorb our carbon dioxide, stabilize climate patterns, and are home to half the world’s plant and animal species. Yet every minute, we lose an area of rainforest the size of 40 football fields, threatening our planet’s health and biodiversity. World Rainforest Day celebrates this precious natural resource and encourages action to preserve it. Your efforts, together with the actions of others, can have a positive impact on rainforests, biodiversity and the climate worldwide. READ MORE

Global patterns in mangrove recreation and tourism
Mangrove distribution
GLOBAL - The use of mangroves as a travel and tourism destination has not received much attention, but provides a high-value, low impact use of these important ecosystems. This work quantifies and maps the distribution of mangrove visitation at global scales using keyword searches on user-generated content of the popular travel website, TripAdvisor. It further explores the use of user-generated content to uncover information about facilities, activities and wildlife in mangrove tourism locations world-wide. Some 3945 mangrove “attractions” are identified in 93 countries and territories. Boating is the most widespread activity, recorded in 82% of English-language sites. Birdlife is recorded by visitors in 28% of sites, with manatees/dugongs and crocodiles/alligators also widely reported. It is likely that mangrove tourism attracts tens to hundreds of millions of visitors annually and is a multi-billion dollar industry. READ MORE

AFRICA

Tanzania chooses energy over the environment
Tanzania chooses energy over nature
TANZANIA - Construction has begun of a mega dam to improve power supply throughout the country. There are fears this could herald the end of the Selous Game Reserve. In the Selous Game Reserve in southern Tanzania, construction work has begun in earnest on a controversial hydropower plant. Earlier this month, Energy Minister Mesard Kaleman announced that preparations had been completed and the two Egyptian companies awarded the contract could now go ahead with building the dam on the Rufiji River. To build the dam, the future flooding area must be freed of all vegetation. That's an area that far exceeds 1,000 square kilometers. The consequences would be devastating, Johannes Kirchgatter of the World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF) says. Along with the dam, roads and settlements would also be created in the reserve area and the whole region would become industrialized. Outside the reserve, downstream, the consequences would also be dramatic. There would be no more flooding as in the past to supply the mangrove swamps in the river delta with sweet water and protect the coast. Fishermen in the delta could suffer if it dried out. READ MORE

Can Africa tap into 'debt-for-nature' plan to protect its forests?
Senegal's mangroves
AFRICAN CONTINENT - African countries may want to explore the opportunities presented by a recently-passed United States law that offers cuts in debt obligations to eligible nations that commit to channel the saved funds to protect their critical forests and coral reefs. The Tropical Forest Conservation Reauthorization Act (TFCA) has reactivated a “debt-for-nature swap” program, that has generated the equivalent of $339 million in local currencies since 1998 to protect 67 million acres of forests in 14 countries. The law creating the program had lapsed in 2014 but was reauthorized early this year. Amid heightening rates of deforestation and limited conservation budgets in many parts of Africa, the TFCA program has the potential to unlock supplementary resources for countries on the continent to protect their key forests and coral reefs. The latest version of the TFCA law includes coral reefs. It is well-known that two-thirds of coral reefs - a crucial natural resource - are threatened with degradation across the globe, including in Africa. Securing them should be a priority since they help to provide food, jobs and protection for almost a half of the world’s population. This also presents additional opportunities for Africa’s 38 coastal states to invest in marine conservation, including mangrove protection and restoration. READ MORE

AMERICAS

Don’t trash coral reefs for the cruise industry!
great-barrier-reef
CAYMAN ISLANDS - The Caribbean: the name conjures up images of pristine white beaches, crystal-clear water and breathtaking coral reefs. The Cayman Islands are a first-rate destination for scuba divers – most would agree that the name “Eden Rock” is quite fitting for the territory’s most famous reef. Yet the local government seems oblivious to the ecological treasure just off its coast: it wants to ramp up mass tourism by dredging the reef and building a new port for mega cruise ships. Up to eight cruise ships at a time can anchor outside the port, and visitors are ferried to George Town by tender vessels. Lately, however, cruise operators have been threatening to only call at ports that can accommodate their mega ships – vast floating resorts with thousands of passengers. Apparently worried about a loss in revenue from mass tourism, the local government is ready to bow to the will of the corporations. To sweeten the deal, cruise operators have made financial commitments to help cover the costs of the project. The ecological damage to the Cayman Islands? Not their problem. READ MORE

Marine Resources Council To Host ‘Mangroves Matter’ on Saturday, July 20
mangroves-matter-celebration-marine-resources-council-event-580
USA - The Marine Resources Council will celebrate International Mangrove Day by hosting “Mangroves Matter,” a free event set for Saturday, July 20 from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Marine Resources Council Science, Education, and Mangrove teams will be on hand to answer mangrove and lagoon questions. The event will feature a delicious menu from Coastal Crab Company, live local musicians, along with a mangrove donation and planting drive. This festivities will take place at Marine Resources Council’s Ted Moorhead Lagoon House Learning Center at 3275 Dixie Hwy NE in Palm Bay. This celebration helps raise awareness and funds to restore the Indian River Lagoon. Educational presentations include a rain barrel workshop, mangrove propagule collection contest, artisan rain barrel auction, silent auction, prizes and more. READ MORE

Mangrove forests, our first line of defense against storm surge
FGCU-study
USA – Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) grad student Gianna Diaz is researching to see how human activity and nature is affecting mangrove forests. She's measuring the size and age of mangrove trees and counting how many baby mangroves are growing in forests from Sarasota to Marco Island. "When we understand that mangroves are critically important, we want to understand what the future looks like for mangroves, how these stressors may influence their ability to persist in the landscape," Dr. Win Everham, a professor at FGCU's water school, said. They're checking different sites to see how hurricanes affect the forests' health. She is also studying the impact of man-made features, like roads, that cut through forests. "We cut through a mangrove system, and we can restrict the ability for the tides to flush the system, in ways we don't fully understand yet. That flushing is important to the long-term health of these forests," Dr. Everham said. READ MORE

ASIA

Heritage site status for Coringa mangroves likely
Coringa Heretage Site
INDIA - The government has begun the process to get UNESCO’s World Heritage Site status for Godavari Mangroves at Coringa Wildlife Sanctuary, near Kakinada, touted to be the second largest mangroves in India. The Environment, Forests, Science and Technology (EFS&T) Department has constituted a seven-member committee for fulfilment of norms required for proposing the Godavari Mangroves (mada forests), at Coringa, as World Heritage Site, according to a GO issued for the purpose. The sanctuary has an 18-km-long sand pit where olive ridley sea turtles nest from January to March every year. There are 24 tree species in the mangroves. The committee is likely to submit its report in two months for declaring Godavari Mangroves, at Coringa, as World Heritage Site to the UNESCO. Once the Coringa sanctuary gets the heritage site tag, UNESCO will help develop tourism and protect the wildlife in the mangroves. READ MORE

Sabah’s mangroves in danger
local danger Malaysia
MALAYSIA - Mangroves are important to Sabah but undervalued and in danger, said Head of Conservation Sabah WWF M’sia Dr Robecca Jumin. “Sabah has the largest area of mangroves of any state in Malaysia, with over 232,000 hectares, mainly along Sabah’s east and southeast coast. Most are protected as Class V Mangrove Forest Reserves, or as Class 1 Protected or Class VI Virgin Jungle Forest Reserves. “However some critical areas, for example on Sabah’s west coast, remain unprotected. “While Sabah should be proud to host two wetlands recognized as being of global importance and designated as Ramsar sites – the Lower Kinabatangan-Segama Wetlands, and Kota Kinabalu Wetland right here in the capital, other parts of Sabah’s mangrove areas are decreasing or being degraded”, Dr Jumin said, in conjunction with World Ocean Day.Despite their immense value, mangroves are in constant danger of being damaged and disrupted by infrastructure like roads, hotels and housing developments, shrimp farms and fish farms, and to a lesser extent from being cut for firewood, charcoal and posts. Pollution, including oil spills and sediment, and rubbish like plastic garbage, are also major threats. 
And the threat is not only from clearance: disruption of river and tidal flows can destroy mangroves and the fisheries and life that they support. READ MORE

Vanishing mangroves a cause of concern
Vanishing mangroves
INDIA - Never before did Kerala turn so conscious about its depleting green cover than in the wake of the recent flood. The deluge and its aftermath woke us from a deep slumber, triggering studies and debates about how the vanishing green could prove extremely detrimental. In that context, the focus naturally shifts to mangroves, the perfect weapon to combat climate change, lessen the impact of storms and preserve marine wealth. However, the district, home to 13 true mangrove species, is witnessing a decline in its cover. According to studies, there is a sharp decline in species abundance and diversity of the plants and associates. Though the present area of mangrove cover in the city is 396 hectares, Avicennia marina, one of the abundantly found species in other parts of Kerala, is on the verge of extinction here. “Avicennia marina is found abundantly in other parts of the state but we see a sharp decline here. READ MORE

OCEANA

Mangrove tree on cattle property carbon dated as more than 700 years old
700 year old mangrove
AUSTRALIA - The expression "farmers are the original environmentalists" gets thrown around a lot in regional Queensland. The expression refers to the ecological management skills those working the land have and how if they mistreat it, they are putting themselves out of a job. Queensland cattle farmer Lindsay Titmarsh proves that behind every saying there is some truth. Mr Titmarsh tends to the vast property with the same care and attention as a cottage garden might receive. He could walk you around the farm for days telling stories about the animals and plants that cohabit with his family and he has even published several books about the region. But of the thousands of trees on Tandora Station, a certain grey mangrove, or Avicennia marina, caught Mr Titmarsh's eye and he instantly knew there was something special about it. Carbon dating has estimated a grey mangrove tree on a Queensland cattle station is 738 years old. Until recently, it was believed the grey mangrove, a common species on coastal mainland Australia, lived for up to 200 years. Professor Norman Duke is a mangrove ecologist and botanist who has named about 10 per cent of the world's mangrove population in his 40 years of study. "This is the oldest [mangrove] tree we know about in Australia and probably the world ranking in that respect," Professor Duke said. READ MORE

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ACTION ALERTS

Don't trash coral reefs for the cruise industry! - TAKE ACTION

Sea turtles or condominiums?
Sand mining and construction work would wipe out a marine biodiversity hotspot and destroy the livelihoods of local people, who have not been consulted. Please SIGN!


Save Penang! Reject the 3-Islands Reclamation
The lack of public consultation and detailed information about the project is shocking in view of the size of proposed reclamation which is 4,500 acres or 7 square miles
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Tell HSBC: Stop Profiting From Destruction – Sign the petition

Halt further destruction of primary mangrove forests in the Maldives. We are urging you to write letters to the recently elected president of the Maldives and his environmental minister View Sample letter

Save Pulau Kukup National Park - second largest mangrove island in the world. Sign The Petition

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UPCOMING EVENTS

2019 Environmental Science and Climate Change Conference September 10-11, 2019
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Restoring natural forests
Restoring The Natural Mangrove Forest
Watch movie

Tanzania CBEMR
Community Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration in Rufiji Delta 
VIEW VIDEO

Video: Mangroves for the Future - A look bacK. As the latest phase of Mangroves for the Future (MFF) draws to a close, this video highlights some of the project’s most successful initiatives – from local women supporting national park management in Viet Nam to an island in the Maldives that has become a model for waste management, and everything in between. View Here

Making the case for Emergency Climate Change Action

Mapping Mangroves
Counting Mangroves

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Placencia mangrove workshop teacher's poem

Volunteer with MAP - LEARN MORE

Watch Children's Mangrove Art Calendar Promo 2019 Click Here

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MAP 2019 Children’s Calendar  CLICK HERE

You can help ensure that the knowledge and skills needed to conserve and restore mangroves is preserved in coastal communities READ MORE

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VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY
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MANGROVE ISSUES 

Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION

What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

What is EPIC? - The Ecosystems Protecting Infrastructure and Communities (EPIC) project:  the role of ecosystems as protective barriers against climate induced hazards

MANGROVES APP AVAILABLE
A pictorial field guide for easy identification of various mangrove species and learning about the mangroves ecosystem. CLICK HERE
View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  
WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

The Value of Mangrove Forests View Video

CBEMR Experience Exchange MAP 2017 English Subtitles
VIEW THE VIDEO

Mangroves: Guidebook to MalaysiaClick Here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE
SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".
Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
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Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

The Marvellous Mangroves Education Forum is an online hub for those utilizing the Marvellous Mangroves (MM) Curriculum. It gives students, teachers and anyone interested in mangroves, the opportunity to learn and share ideas themed around the curriculum, to connect and communicate with others around the globe whilst exploring mangroves from your computer or on the go. VISIT

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The award-winning Marvellous Mangroves (MM) curriculum educates children on the importance of mangroves and their ecological functions, teaching them about modern challenges and mechanisms for sustainability. VIEW VIDEO

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

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Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW
VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

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Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

 Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE

"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
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Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection
Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp


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